Fuller

Following Jesus Today

by Mark D. Roberts, Ph.D.
Executive Director
Fuller’s Max De Pree Center for Leadership

© Copyright 2020 De Pree Center. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents

Part 1: When In Doubt, Follow Jesus (Luke 5:27-28)
Part 2: Surprised by Jesus (Luke 1:30-34)
Part 3: Giving God All That You Are (Luke 1:38)
Part 4: God’s Miracle and Mary’s Work (Luke 1:35)
Part 5: A Humble Beginning (Luke 2:6-7)
Part 6: Weeping Over Our Cities (Luke 2:7, 19:41)
Part 7: The Vulnerability of Jesus (Luke 2:6-7)
Part 8: Living and Leading Vulnerably (Luke 2:6-7)
Part 9: A Moving Example of Vulnerable Leadership (Luke 2:6-7)
Part 10: Affirming All Ages (Luke 2:36-38)
Part 11: The Truly Human Jesus (Luke 2:39-40)
Part 12: Raising Children Together (Luke 2:48)
Part 13: Use Your Power Justly (Luke 3:12-14)
Part 14: God Loves You and Delights in You (Luke 3:21-22)
Part 15: Living for God’s Pleasure (Luke 3:21-22)
Part 16: When You Are Tempted (Luke 4:1-2)
Part 17: More Shocking Than Iron Man (Luke 4:17-21)
Part 18: Celebrating and Striving (Luke 4:17-21)
Part 19: Serving People on the Margins (Luke 4:24-27)
Part 20: Honoring the Authority of Jesus (Luke 4:31-32)
Part 21: Honoring the Authority of Jesus: An Example (Luke 4:31-32)
Part 22: Purpose Over Popularity (Luke 4:42-44)
Part 23: Prayer and Purpose (Luke 4:42-44; 5:15-16)
Part 24: Proclaiming the Kingdom of God (Luke 4:42-44)
Part 25: Responding to His Call (Luke 5:8-11)
Part 26: You Don’t Have to Be Perfect to Follow Jesus (Luke 5:4-8)
Part 27: Must I Leave Everything Behind (Luke 5:9-11)
Part 28: Healing Beyond Healing (Luke 5:12-14)
Part 29: Taking Risks (Luke 5:18-19)
Part 30: Why Take Risks? (Luke 5:18-19)
Part 31: Must I Leave Everything Behind? Further Thoughts (Luke 5:27-28)
Part 32: Using Your Stuff for Kingdom Purposes (Luke 5:27-28)
Part 33: New Wine and New Wineskins (Luke 5:36-39)
Part 34: The Disruption of Wine and Wineskins (Luke 5:36-39)
Part 35: Wine, Wineskins, and the Challenge of Leadership (Luke 5:36-38)
Part 36: An Unexpected Lord (Luke 6:1-5)
Part 37: Is Jesus the Lord of Your Sabbath? (Luke 6:1-5)
Part 38: The Purpose of the Sabbath (Luke 6:6-10)
Part 39: The Extraordinary Value of Wholeness (Luke 8:32-33)
Part 40: The Extraordinary Value of Wholeness, Part 2 (Luke 8:47-48)
Part 41: How Can You Proclaim the Kingdom of God? (Luke 9:1-10)
Part 42: What Jesus’s Miracles Reveal (Luke 9:16-17)
Part 43: When Jesus Sends You Out on a Limb (Luke 9:14-15)
Part 44: Why Taking Risks for Jesus is Tricky (Luke 9:14-15)
Part 45: Where Did Jesus Get His Shocking Vision? (Luke 9:21-22)
Part 46: Do You Want to Be the Richest Person in the World? (Luke 9:24-25)
Part 47: Did Jesus Get It Wrong? (Luke 9:26-27)
Part 48: A Glimpse of Glory (Luke 9:28-31)
Part 49: And Then, Back to Reality (Luke 9:37-41)
Part 50: Jesus Shares Our Sorrows . . . and More (Luke 9:37-41)
Part 51: Do You Want to Be Great? (Luke 9:46-48)
Part 52: Have You Set Your Face? (Luke 9:51)
Part 53: An Awkward and Teachable Moment (Luke 22:24-27)
Part 54: Jesus Reclaims Our Brokenness (Luke 22:31-34)
Part 55: The Anguish of Jesus (Luke 22:39-44)
Part 56: The Shocking Prayer of Jesus (Luke 22:39-42)
Part 57: Not My Will But Yours Be Done (Luke 22:39-42)
Part 58: How Does God See You? (Luke 22:54-62)
Part 59: Hiding Behind Mockery (Luke 22:63-65)
Part 60: What’s Jesus’s Line? (Luke 22:66-71)
Part 61: Jesus as a Big Giant Spoon (Luke 23:1-5)
Part 62: Joy to the World . . . in Lent? (Luke 19:37-40)
Part 63: Taking Responsibility for Jesus’s Death (Luke 23:13-25)
Part 64: Carrying the Cross (Luke 23:26)
Part 65: Unexpected King. Unexpected Salvation. (Luke 23:32-38)
Part 66: Jesus Remembers You (Luke 23:39-43)
Part 67: Giving All You Are to God (Luke 23:44-49)
Part 68: Why the Burial of Jesus Matters (Luke 23:50-56)
Part 69: He is Not Here, But Has Risen! (Luke 24:1-6)

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Part 1: When In Doubt, Follow Jesus

Scripture – Luke 5:27-28 (NRSV)

After this [Jesus] went out and saw a tax collector named Levi, sitting at the tax booth; and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he got up, left everything, and followed him.

Focus

In a time of uncertainty, when we’re not sure quite what to do, it’s good to follow Jesus. When we wonder where our lives are headed and what they’ll be like when we get there, it’s good to follow Jesus. When you’re not quite sure what to think or how to live, here’s something you can hang onto: When in doubt, follow Jesus!

Devotion

A woman hiking and reaching back to take the hand of the person behind herToday I’m beginning a new Life for Leaders series called: “Following Jesus Today.” In the next several weeks I want to think with you about what it means to follow Jesus in our world at this time of history. Yes, along the way we’ll consider the particular challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. But this devotional series will be, I hope, not only timely but also timeless. No matter the context, no matter the challenge, no matter the confusion engulfing us, it’s always good to turn our attention back to Jesus. I don’t know what will be expected of me in the future. I don’t know the challenges I’ll face or the opportunities that will be presented to me. But I do know this: When in doubt, follow Jesus!

Of course, for us, following Jesus today isn’t exactly like what it was for people who encountered Jesus in the flesh. For example, when Jesus approached Levi the tax collector and said to him, “Follow me,” Levi “got up, left everything, and followed him” (Luke 5:28). He literally went after Jesus, walking along as Jesus led. Later, Levi threw a great party for Jesus so that he might introduce him to his friends and associates (Luke 5:29).

You and I don’t have the chance to follow Jesus in that way. So what does it mean for us to follow Jesus today? That’s the question I want to explore with you in this Life for Leaders devotional series. We’re going to focus on passages from the Gospel of Luke that show us something about Jesus and what it means for us to follow him. Though we can’t actually walk behind him, going wherever he goes, we can follow Jesus by heeding his call, listening to his teachings, believing and doing what he says, getting to know him personally, learning his way of life, being formed in the image of his character, praying as he teaches us, and joining in his kingdom-centered mission.

Seven hundred years ago, a man living in a small village in southern England offered a simple, heartfelt prayer: “Thanks be to Thee, my Lord Jesus Christ, for all the benefits Thou hast given me, for all the pains and insults which Thou hast borne for me. O most merciful Redeemer, Friend, and Brother, may I know Thee more clearly, love Thee more dearly, follow Thee more nearly, day by day. Amen.” This prayer of St. Richard of Chichester has resonated in the hearts of Christians around the world, echoing throughout the centuries. It is my prayer for you and me as we begin this Life for Leaders series. Indeed, in this particular time of history, with so many challenges and opportunities before us, may we know Jesus more clearly, love him more dearly, and follow him more nearly, day by day, even today!

Reflect

Do you think of yourself as following Jesus in your daily life? At work? In your community? With your family and friends? With your church? Why do you think this way? Or why not?

When you picture someone in today’s world following Jesus, who comes to mind? What are they doing?

What might it mean for you to follow Jesus today as you do your work, interact with your housemates, and engage with others either online or in person?

Act

Use the prayer of St. Richard as a way turning your mind and heart to Jesus. For the next several days, pray this prayer, either silently or out loud, several times a day.

Pray

Thanks be to Thee, my Lord Jesus Christ, for all the benefits Thou hast given me, for all the pains and insults which Thou hast borne for me.

O most merciful Redeemer, Friend, and Brother, may I know Thee more clearly, love Thee more dearly, follow Thee more nearly, day by day. Amen.


Part 2: Surprised by Jesus

Scripture – Luke 1:30-34 (NRSV)

The angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. And now, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you will name him Jesus. He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Most High, and the Lord God will give to him the throne of his ancestor David. He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end.” Mary said to the angel, “How can this be, since I am a virgin?”

Click here to read all of Luke 1:26-38.

Focus

Jesus is full of surprises. Even before he was born, his entrance into the world surprised his mother, Mary. And that was just the beginning. Jesus continues to surprise us today, even and especially those of us who follow him. Just when we think we have Jesus all figured out, he surprises us with unexpected wisdom, vision, compassion, power, and grace. Are you open to being surprised by Jesus today?

Devotion

A number of years ago, I wrote a manuscript that I hoped would become a book about Jesus. I intended to call the book Surprised by Jesus. My main point was that Jesus continually surprises us, even when we think we know him well. A publisher loved my thesis and my title, so I got to work writing Surprised by Jesus. After I turned in the complete manuscript, however, the publisher got back to me with a mixed report. “We love what you’ve written,” he said, “but our editorial board isn’t sold on the name Surprised by Jesus. We need to work on other options.” And so we did, experimenting with a variety of possibilities. Finally, the board gave their thumbs up to Jesus Revealed. So, I went through my manuscript, minimizing the surprise theme. Months later, Jesus Revealed: Know Him Better to Love Him Better was published. (You can still purchase a copy from Amazon, if you’re interested.)

A book cover showing an icon of Jesus with the words "Jesus Revealed" across itThough I’m fine with Jesus Revealed, I still like Surprised by Jesus. Why? Because from the very beginning, Jesus was surprising. And he kept on surprising people throughout his life, right to the very end . . . and beyond.

Jesus was surprising people even before he was born. Take the case of his mother, Mary. While she is minding her own business, engaged to a man named Joseph, she is surprised by the visit of an angel. When he says, “Greetings, favored one! The Lord is with you,” Luke says that Mary was “perplexed” (1:29). No doubt she was also surprised. The angel proceeded to tell her that she would soon become pregnant, even though she was a virgin. Now that’s a surprise! Moreover, the child she would bear would be “great” and “called the Son of the Most High” and would reign from “the throne of his ancestor David” forever (Luke 1:32-33). Mary would conceive by the Holy Spirit so that her child would be called “Son of God” (Luke 1:35). Talk about surprises!

Of course, this was just the beginning. Jesus continued to surprise Mary, and his earthly father Joseph, and those with whom he grew up, and those who followed him, and those who opposed him. He surprised those who thought they had him figured out and those who couldn’t make sense of him. Though people responded to Jesus in vastly different ways during his lifetime, almost everyone would have agreed that he was surprising.

In tomorrow’s Life for Leaders devotion I want to think with you about Mary’s response to the surprises of the angel’s message. Today, I want to pause for a moment and encourage you to reflect upon the surprise(s) of Jesus in your life. Let the following questions guide your reflections.

Reflect

Take some time to read slowly the story of Mary’s encounter with the angel (Luke 1:26-38). Imagine what this encounter might have been like for Mary. What was she thinking? How was she feeling?

Can you think of a time (or several times) when you were surprised by Jesus? What was this like for you?

How open are you to the surprises Jesus has in store for you?

Act

With your small group or with a friend, talk about ways Jesus has surprised you. Listen to the experience of others. See what you learn about ways Jesus surprises today.

Pray

Lord Jesus, you were surprising from the beginning. Your way of entering the world was certainly a surprise to your mother. Being pregnant was probably the last thing she was expecting in that season of her life. And giving birth to the Son of God was surely not on her agenda.

Lord, you continue to surprise us today. Even those of us who seek to follow you faithfully are surprised by what we see in the Gospels, by what we hear you say and see you do. We’re also surprised by the way your grace is active in our lives today. You are always doing the unexpected.

Help me, Lord, to be open to your surprises. May I trust that your ways are always the best, even when I find them shocking or unsettling. Amen.


Part 3: Giving God All That You Are

Scripture – Luke 1:38 (NRSV)

Then Mary said, “Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word.” Then the angel departed from her.

Click here to read all of Luke 1:26-38.

Focus

From an angel, Mary heard the unsettling news that she would give birth to a son even though she was a virgin. Mary’s life was about to be turned utterly upside down. How did she respond to this shocking news? By offering herself fully and freely to God. “Here I am,” she said, “the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word.” O God, by your grace, may I be like Mary, giving all that I am to you.

Devotion

A person standing on a hill at sunrise in a prayerful postureIn yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion we considered the surprise of Jesus for Mary. Though she was a virgin, she learned she would give birth to a child. That would have been a giant surprise all by itself. But, according to the angel, Mary’s child would be the ruler over the house of Jacob and, indeed, the very Son of God. Talk about surprises! Mary must have been gobsmacked.

When she first learned that she would be giving birth, Mary asked the angel a reasonable question: “How can this be, since I am a virgin?” (Luke 1:34). She knew enough of human physiology to understand how babies are made and that she should not be in the process of making one. The angel explained that Mary would conceive through the Holy Spirit as “the power of the Most High” overshadowed her (Luke 1:35). In order to reassure Mary that such a thing would be possible for God, the angel pointed to the extraordinary pregnancy of Mary’s relative Elizabeth, who was preparing to give birth even in her old age.

So how did Mary respond to all of these surprises? She said, “Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word” (Luke 1:38). The simple phrase “Here am I” echoes the responses of Moses and Isaiah, both of whom answered God’s call by saying, “Here I am” (Exodus 3:4; Isaiah 6:8). Moreover, like these faithful ones from the Old Testament, Mary offered herself fully and freely to God. “Let it be with me according to your word” (Luke 1:38) is the fitting response of one who saw herself as God’s servant.

Since her story is so familiar to us, it can be hard for us to imagine how utterly unexpected and unsettling the angel’s news would have been for Mary. She surely realized that her unplanned pregnancy would not be a happy surprise for her family, friends, and fiancé. After all, who would believe her account of how she got pregnant? The Gospel of Matthew reveals that Joseph intended to break off their engagement quietly in an effort to hide Mary from public disgrace. He did not believe Mary’s story until an angelic vision reassured him (Matthew 1:19-24). As Mary pondered the angel’s news, she no doubt understood that her life had just gotten immeasurably more complicated and uncomfortable. Nevertheless, she offered herself to the Lord as his servant. She chose to have her life shaped, not by her own hopes and expectations, but by God’s word.

I find Mary’s brief response to the angel to be one of the most moving sentences in all of Scripture. I am stunned by her willingness to give to God all that she was, even the most intimate parts of herself. I am reminded, by contrast, of how hard it is for me to surrender even relatively inconsequential parts of my life to the Lord. Yes, I believe I am, like Mary, a servant of the Lord. And I really want to live as God’s servant. But am I able truthfully to say with Mary, “Let it be with me according to your word”? Will I take whatever it is that God wants to give me? O Lord, may it be so. May I be like Mary, living by your grace and for your glory.

Reflect

What do you think enabled Mary to respond to the angel in such an astounding way? What might have brought her to the point where she could offer her whole being to the Lord as his servant?

Can you think of a time in your life when God asked you to do something big, perhaps something scary or truly sacrificial? How did you respond? Why did you respond this way?

What might God be asking of you today? How might you respond?

Act

If you are aware of God asking something of you, take time to reflect upon this and how you are reacting. If possible, talk about this with your small group, with a trusted friend, or with your pastor or spiritual director.

Pray

Gracious God, once again I am struck by Mary’s faithfulness and trust. Knowing that her life would never be the same again, knowing that the road ahead would be a hard one, nevertheless she offered herself to you. “Here I am,” she said. Here I am, Lord, here for you. “Let it be with me according to your word.”

How amazing, Lord! How inspiring! How challenging! You know that I struggle with giving you parts of my life that are nothing like what Mary gave to you. I hold back in fear or in a desire to run my own life. Yet I hear the echoes of Mary’s profession, “Here I am, the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word.”

O God, help me to be like Mary, to trust you fully, to submit to you freely, to let my life be guided by your will for me. By your grace may I say to you: Here I am, Lord. I am your servant. Let it be with me according to your word. May I exist for your praise, your purpose, your glory. Amen.


Part 4: God’s Miracle and Mary’s Work

Scripture – Luke 1:35 (NRSV)

The angel said to her, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be holy; he will be called Son of God.

Click here to read all of Luke 1:26-38.

Focus

Christians celebrate the miracle of Jesus’s birth, especially his conception by the Holy Spirit. Yet, too often we ignore Mary’s participation, the work she did of carrying, nurturing, and then giving birth to her baby. The experience of Mary helps us recognize that God’s work in the world comes through the miracle of grace made flesh through human work. As we participate in God’s work, we celebrate both divine miracles and human labor.

Devotion

A pregnant woman sitting on a benchThis week we have begun our new devotional series, Following Jesus Today, by focusing on the story of Mary’s encounter with the angel in Luke 1. Though Mary was surely surprised by the angel’s news of her pending pregnancy, and though this news would have utterly upended her life, nevertheless Mary responded by giving God all that she was. “Here am I,” she said, “the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word” (Luke 1:38).

Christians have for centuries celebrated the unique and miraculous nature of Mary’s conception. Especially at Christmastime we marvel over the miracle of how Mary became pregnant by the power of the Holy Spirit. Yet this miracle is also commemorated week after week in Ordinary Time as Christians confess our faith with the words of the Apostle’s Creed. We say that we “believe in Jesus Christ . . . who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary.”

We are certainly right to wonder over the miracle of Jesus’s conception. Yet sometimes I fear we overlook what is implicit in the story of Jesus’s birth. I’m talking about Mary’s part, not just her willingness to conceive by the power of the Spirit, but also everything else that is implied in the phrase, “born of the Virgin Mary.” Though her conception was unique and supernatural, Mary experienced a natural, down-to-earth pregnancy, with all its joys and challenges. No doubt Mary rejoiced with wonder when she first felt Jesus kick in her womb. She certainly experienced the discomfort of full-term pregnancy, especially as she was making her way to Bethlehem. And then Mary gave birth without medication in less than ideal circumstances. Talk about work!

The birth of Jesus was a result both of God’s miracle and Mary’s work. We say sometimes that birth is a miracle and in a sense this is true. But if you ask any woman who has actually given birth, she’ll tell you it is also work—hard work, perhaps the hardest work a person will ever do.

So, in this devotion I am not in the least downplaying God’s miraculous contribution to the birth of Jesus. But I am playing up Mary’s contribution, the work she did of carrying, nurturing, and then giving birth to her baby. Why does this matter? Because we often ignore the human part of God’s work in the world. We celebrate the miracles without also celebrating human labor. But the birth of Jesus challenges us to value and to celebrate it all. The experience of Mary helps us recognize that God’s work in the world comes through the miracle of grace made flesh through human work.

Reflect

In your experience, has Mary’s participation in the birth of Jesus received much attention? If so, why is this? If not, why not?

Can you think of ways in which your work is like Mary’s? Is God’s grace made flesh through the work you do?

Act

As you work today, whether your work is compensated or not, think about how God is present in your work. Jot down some thoughts about how your work is a working out of God’s grace. Then share these thoughts with your small group or a good friend.

Pray

Gracious God, we do marvel over the wonderful of Mary’s conception. We are reminded by her experience that all things are possible for you, and we celebrate your mysterious and amazing grace.

Yet we don’t want to neglect Mary’s part in the story of Jesus’s birth. She accepted not only miraculous conception but also all that followed from it. She did the exhausting work of carrying a child and giving birth. Her work wasn’t incidental, Lord. It was essential to your plan and your work.

Though there is something unique about Mary’s work, may her example remind us of the value of human labor. Yes, Lord, we celebrate your miracles. But we also celebrate your choice to work in and through us. Our efforts matter to you and make a difference in your world. Thank you for honoring us in this way.

Help us to work faithfully in all we do, seeking your glory in every task. Amen.


Part 5: A Humble Beginning

Scripture – Luke 2:6-7 (NRSV)

While they were there, the time came for her to deliver her child. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

You can read all of Luke 2:1-7 here.

Focus

What does it mean to follow one who was born in a manger? It does not mean that we must necessarily sleep on beds of straw. But it does mean that the one we follow will lead us in the way of humility. The same Jesus whose birth was so humble is the one whose death was designed to maximize humiliation. We follow Jesus by surrendering our preoccupation with comfort and honor, choosing instead to give ourselves away in service to God and others.

Devotion

A wooden mangerI’ll admit that it feels a little odd to be writing about the birth of Jesus in a devotion for the first day of June. After all, we’re almost as far away from Christmas as we get in the year. Yet, if allow the Gospel of Luke to teach us to follow Jesus today, then we ought to reflect on the story of the Nativity.

We know from the opening verses of Luke 2 that Jesus was born in Bethlehem because his human parents, Joseph and Mary, went there to registered with the Roman Empire. While in Bethlehem, Mary went into labor. She gave birth to Jesus, “her firstborn son” and “wrapped him in bands of cloth.” So far, there is nothing particularly unusual about this description. But then Luke adds that they “laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn” (2:7).

If you were hearing this story for the first time, those details would be quite surprising. For one thing, newborn infants were not usually laid to rest in animal feeding troughs (the primary meaning of phatne, or “manger”). The mention of the manger suggests that the location where Jesus was born could have been a stable connected to a house, the lower floor of a house used mainly for animals, or a stand-alone stable or cave.

Why was Jesus born in such an odd place and put down in such an unusual cradle? Because, Luke explains, “there was no place for them in the inn” (2:7). As I read this, I can’t help but picture dozens of children’s Christmas pageants in which Mary and Joseph knock on a cardboard door labeled “Inn,” only to be turned away by a heartless young innkeeper with a fluffy fake beard. Though the innkeeper scene is historically possible, the Greek word translated here as “inn” (kataluma) could refer rather to the guest room of a home. If it was full of travelers needing to be registered, then the availability and privacy of the stable might have been preferable for all parties, even Mary and Joseph.

No matter the precise details, however, the birth of Jesus was assuredly humble. This is not what anyone would have expected for the baby identified by the angel Gabriel as “the Son of the Most High” and “Son of God” (Luke 1:32, 35). Such a humble birth does reflect, however, what was real about Jesus, who “though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death – even death on a cross” (Philippians 2:6-8). The humility of Jesus’s birth foreshadows the even greater humility yet to come, when he chose to be executed in a way that was designed to maximize both humiliation and suffering (Philippians 2:8).

For most of us, following Jesus today will not mean we sleep in a bed intended for animals. But when we reflect on the birth of Jesus, we are forewarned. Following one from such humble beginnings will lead us in the path of humility, and this will not be easy. By God’s grace, our preoccupation with our own comfort and honor will be replaced by life of humble service both to God and to others.

Reflect

As you think about the birth of Jesus, especially when so far removed from the usual celebrations of Christmas, what thoughts come to mind? What feelings? How do you respond to the simple story in Luke 2:1-7?

Whom in your life would you consider to be humble? What about how they live would you describe as humble? Why?

Would you say that you are a humble person? Why or why not?

What helps you to grow in humility?

Act

Ask the Lord to show you one way to serve someone else humbly this week. Put the needs of that person ahead of your own needs. See if you can serve without worrying too much about yourself.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for humbling yourself, becoming human, even accepting the manger as your first bed. Thank you for your willingness to enter into our reality, and to do so in a way that was so vulnerable and humble.

You know, Lord, that I’m not always a big fan of humility, especially when it comes to myself. I want to be the best. I want to be right. I want to be a person of influence. I don’t naturally desire to serve, to put others before myself, to reject my own desire for glory. Forgive me.

Yet, I want to follow you, Jesus, even in your humility. Help me to choose your way of living, to care, not about myself, but others. May I learn to serve even as you came to serve. To you be all the glory. Amen.


Part 6: Weeping Over Our Cities

Scripture – Luke 2:7, 19:41 (NRSV)

And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

As [Jesus] came near and saw the city, he wept over it.

Focus

Contrary to the claims of a beloved carol, it’s not actually true of Jesus that “no crying he makes.” In Luke 19 we see Jesus weeping expressively over the broken and suffering city of Jerusalem. His example invites us to feel and express our grief over the brokenness and suffering of our own cities today. We are saddened and angry when we see people created in God’s image mistreated and even murdered. Our expression of grief opens our hearts to receive God’s call in a new ways as agents of his peace, justice, and love.

Devotion

boy crying into his shirtOne of the very first things I learned about Jesus was that, as a baby, he didn’t cry. The source of this information was, of course, the beloved Christmas carol, “Away in a Manager.” When “the little Lord Jesus” is awakened by the lowing of the cattle, “no crying he makes.” Only later in life did I learn that the theology of this verse was way out of line with Scripture. If Jesus was truly the incarnation of the Word of God, if he was fully human in addition to being fully divine, then he surely participated in normal human behavior, like crying when he was a baby.

In fact, the biblical gospels actually depict the crying of Jesus, not as an infant, but as a grown man. Perhaps the most familiar example appears in John 11, where Jesus wept along with those who were grieving over the death of Lazarus (John 11:31-35). Another example appears in Luke 19, where Jesus approaches the city of Jerusalem. “As he came near and saw the city,” Luke tells us, “he wept over it” (19:41). In fact, the Greek word translated here a “wept” is a powerful verb that could even be translated as “wailed” (klaio). We’re not talking about a modest sniffle, but a strong, gut-wrenching, public expression of grief.

Why did Jesus weep in this dramatic way? In Luke 19, Jesus explains his sadness over Jerusalem. The city had had a chance to embrace the peace that Jesus offered, but they rejected it even as they rejected him. The salvation of God was now hidden from Jerusalem, which, in time would be crushed to the ground because they failed to recognize their “visitation from God” (19:44). Jesus felt tremendous grief as he gazed upon the broken city. He wept, much as the prophet Jeremiah once wept over Judah and Jerusalem (Jer. 9:1-11).

The example of Jesus gives us permission to grieve over the brokenness and pain of our cities today. It invites us to feel and express our sadness and anger over suffering and injustice. In this time of history in the United States we need this permission and invitation, perhaps now more than ever. Over 100,000 of our fellow citizens have now died from COVID-19, devastating families, communities, and churches. Over 40 million people have lost their jobs and now face extreme economic hardships.

Then, in the midst of this horror, we learn of the senseless killings of African-Americans, culminating in the murder of George Floyd by a white police officer. The pain and rage of millions of people of color and their allies is expressed in fervent prayer meetings and peaceful protests, which some people exploit as an occasion for acts of violence. Yet, these acts mustn’t take our attention away from the injustice of racism that continues to plague our society, systems, and even our own hearts. We rightly grieve over the mistreatment of people created in God’s image. We rightly repent over our own participation in unjust structures. We who seek to follow Jesus have every reason to weep over our own cities much as Jesus once did over Jerusalem.

Of course Jesus didn’t stop there. After weeping he also acted decisively and sacrificially to bring a more pervasive peace than anyone could have imagined. Grief over injustice and suffering isn’t the end of our response, but just the beginning. As we take our grief to the Lord, we ask what he would have us do. We offer ourselves as instruments of his peace, as seekers of his justice in every part of life, and as people who love in deed and not only in word. Weeping opens us up to feel God’s heart, receive God’s direction, and join in his kingdom mission. What this means for each one of us will be distinctive, given our situation in life and our particular callings. But we can all do something to advance the cause of justice in our part of the world and to stand in solidarity with the African American community in the midst of our current crisis.

Reflect

How do you respond to the weeping of Jesus over Jerusalem? Have you ever done something like this? If so, when and why? What was it like for you?

How do you feel about what’s happening in our country right now (and, indeed, throughout the world)? How do you express your feelings and thoughts to the Lord?

Act 1

Take some time to open your heart to God. Ask him to give you his heart for what’s happening in our world today, including our cities. Give yourself freedom to express whatever you feel to the Lord.

Act 2

I would like to add a second Act section to today’s devotion. It’s relevant especially for those of you who are like me. These days I’m especially aware of my own social location as a privileged white male. It can be hard for me to understand the experience of those whose lives are so different from mine, including African American people. I’m thankful for those who have helped me to grow in my understanding and empathy, though I know I have a long way to go.

If, like me, you want to expand your mind and heart when it comes to issues of race, let me point to a couple helpful resources. First, Dr. Dwight Radcliff, assistant provost of the Pannell Center for African American Church Studies at Fuller Seminary talks about “Black Pain” in a podcast with Fuller’s president, Dr. Mark Labberton. Second, I had the privilege of helping to interview Austin Channing Brown in the “Making It Work” podcast the De Pree Center produces with the Theology of Work Project. Austin, the author of I’m Still Here: Black Dignity in a World Made for Whiteness, talked for the podcast on the subject, “The Invisible Burden of Being a Black Woman in the Workplace.” This was an enlightening and touching conversation that I’d love to share with you.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for weeping over Jerusalem. Thank you for feeling grief over sin and suffering. Thank you for teaching us that it’s right to express grief without hesitation or shame.

O Lord, as we look at our cities today, we grieve. We feel a deep sadness over the suffering of others, whether from disease, loss, fear, violence, or injustice. We listen to the anguish of our fellow citizens and grieve, perhaps even weep.

As we do, give us hearts like yours, Lord, hearts of compassion for others, hearts of passion for your justice, hearts ready to serve and sacrifice. And as we open our hearts to you, show us we should participate in the work of your kingdom, as we do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with you. Amen.


Part 7: The Vulnerability of Jesus

Scripture – Luke 2:6-7 (NRSV)

While they were there, the time came for her to deliver her child. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

You can read all of Luke 2:1-7 here.

Focus

In Jesus, the Son of God, God entered human life as a baby. He was defenseless and vulnerable, utterly dependent on his parents for everything. How amazing to think that God chose to come among us in this way. This means, among other things, that God understands. To put it simply, God gets you. So, when you feel vulnerable and weak, when you turn to the Lord for help, you can count on his empathy as well as his grace. God is there for you!

Devotion

A woman carrying her baby on her backThe vulnerability of the infant Jesus really didn’t dawn on me until the birth of Linda’s and my first child, Nathan, in 1992. While we were in the hospital, with lots of fine medical assistance, I recognized just how much Nathan depended on others for his very life. I felt daunted by the fact that in a couple of days Linda and I would assume full responsibility for making sure Nathan was okay. There was no way he could manage on his own. (He does just fine now, let me add—27 years later.)

We brought Nathan home from the hospital on Christmas Eve. As he slept, I finally had a few moments to prepare my sermon for our church’s Christmas Eve services. Reflecting on the biblical text and my three-day long experience of parenting, I was struck by the fact that, like my son, Jesus began life as a vulnerable infant. He, of course, didn’t even have doctors and nurses to ease his welcome into the world. He was completely dependent on his parents and, perhaps, their relatives in Bethlehem.

The vulnerability of Jesus is especially striking when you consider who he was. He wasn’t just a newborn infant, the son of Mary and Joseph. He was also the Son of God, the Word of God in human flesh. This means that God chose to enter human life by becoming utterly vulnerable. Jesus could have shown up as a fully-grown man, or as some kind of invincible demigod (picture Thor or Wonder Woman, with awesome super-powers). But, instead, the all-powerful God chose the way of weakness, dependence, and vulnerability.

One implication of the vulnerability of Jesus is that he understands what it’s like to be human. He gets you and me in a deeply personal way. As it says in Hebrews 2:17, Jesus became “like his brothers and sisters in every respect, so that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest.” Hebrews 4:15 adds, “For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who in every respect has been tested as we are, yet without sin.” When you feel vulnerable, Jesus understands. When you feel weak, Jesus gets it. This truth can be especially reassuring in a world infected by a life-threatening, economy-disrupting, relationship-limiting virus. When you talk with Jesus about how you’re doing, his heart is right there with you.

Reflect

As you reflect on the vulnerability of the infant Jesus, what thoughts and feelings come to mind?

Does your relationship with Jesus reflect the fact that he is “like you in every respect” and is “able to sympathize with your weaknesses”? If so, how and why? If not, why not?

Act

Read Hebrews 4:14-16. As you reflect on the “sympathy” and “weakness” of Jesus, take seriously the exhortation of verse 16.

Pray

Gracious God, thank you for becoming fully human in Jesus. Thank you for entering this life as a weak, needy, vulnerable baby. Thank you for understanding what it means to experience life as we do. Thank you for the freedom this gives us to approach you in prayer.

Help me, Lord, to take seriously the vulnerability of Jesus. Help me to believe that, through him, you understand what it’s like to be human. When I feel weak and exposed, when I feel dependent and needy, you know what this is like. Your understanding gives me such freedom as I open my heart to you in prayer. Thank you! Amen.


Part 8: Living and Leading Vulnerably

Scripture – Luke 2:6-7 (NRSV) 

While they were there, the time came for her to deliver her child. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

You can read all of Luke 2:1-7 here.

Focus

In this time of history, when we’re dealing with a pandemic and other major challenges, leadership requires vulnerability. After all, we who lead in this day must take risks. There is no other way, no safe path. We must try things we haven’t tried before. We must acknowledge that we don’t have all the answers. We must learn to be honest with our colleagues so that we might discover together the best ways to move forward in the face of uncertainty. We need to put ourselves, our success, and our reputation on the line. As we do, we will indeed live and lead vulnerably, like Jesus, who is there to help us.

Devotion

A person standing on a beach looking out at stormy waves.What does it mean to be vulnerable? The word “vulnerable” comes from the Latin word vulnus, which means “wound.” When we are vulnerable, we can be wounded physically or emotionally by external forces, systems, circumstances, or other people. We are vulnerable when we put ourselves out there beyond what is safe, familiar, and comfortable. We open ourselves up to the possibility of being wounded. Surely the infant Jesus could have been hurt in many ways if his parents had mistreated him. Ultimately, of course, the vulnerability of Jesus was seen most of all on the cross as he was literally “wounded for our transgressions, and crushed for our iniquities” (Isaiah 53:5).

Brené Brown, in her book Braving the Wilderness, defines vulnerability this way: It is “uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure.” Brown is probably the world’s leading advocate of vulnerability through her writings, speaking, and especially her TED talk. So far, “The Power of Vulnerability” has been watched 48,089,280 times as the fourth most popular TED talk of all time. Brown demonstrates that vulnerability is essential if we seek to live whole, meaningful, and generative lives. We need to be open, to take risks, to exercise courage as we put ourselves on the line.

Leadership guru Patrick Lencioni claims that vulnerability is essential if we wish to lead productive teams. In The Advantage, he argues that building trust is foundational to leadership. And trust, according to Lencioni, is a response to vulnerability. “The kind of trust that is necessary to build a great team is what I call vulnerability-based trust. This is what happens when members get to a point where they are completely comfortable being transparent, honest, and naked with one another, where they say and genuinely mean things like ‘I screwed up,’ ‘I need help,’ ‘Your idea is better than mine,’ ‘I wish I could learn to do that as well as you do,’ and even, ‘I’m sorry.’” Lencioni goes on to say, “At the heart of vulnerability lies the willingness of people to abandon their pride and their fear, to sacrifice their egos for the collective good of the team.”

Jesus sacrificed his ego, and indeed his life, not just for the collective good of his team of disciples, but also for the good of the entire world. He risked everything in response to his conviction about what his Heavenly Father was calling him to do (Mark 14:32-42). He who began his earthly life vulnerably ended it in the same way; at first in a manger, at last on a cross.

I may not agree with everything Brené Brown and Patrick Lencioni say about vulnerability in life and leadership. I’m certainly not equating their insights with the example of Jesus. But I am struck by the fact that what Jesus models for us in birth, life, and death is being commended by such influential thought leaders in psychology and business. Even if we don’t buy all that Brown and Lencioni propose, we surely ought to follow their example by considering how the vulnerability of Jesus should inform how we live and lead. (By the way, in recent years, Harvard Business Review has featured articles with titles like, “Why CEOs Should Model Vulnerability,” “Expressing Your Vulnerability Makes You Stronger,” and “Vulnerability: The Defining Trait of Great Entrepreneurs.”)

In this time of history, when we’re dealing with a pandemic, racial injustice, and other major challenges, I can’t imagine leadership that is not vulnerable. After all, we who lead in this day must take risks. There is no other way, no safe path. We must put ourselves out in front where we might be attacked. We must try things we haven’t tried before. We must acknowledge that we don’t have all the answers. We must learn to be honest with our colleagues so that we might discover together the best ways to move forward in the face of uncertainty. We need to put ourselves, our success, and our reputation on the line. As we do, we will indeed live and lead vulnerably, like Jesus, who is there to help us.

Reflect

How do you respond to the ideas of Brené Brown and Patrick Lencioni? Are you intrigued? Hesitant? Persuaded? Unconvinced?

Surely there are times when vulnerability is wise and times when it is unwise. It’s not wise, for example, to be vulnerable by running out into the middle of a freeway. Nor is it wise to share your deep hurts with someone who will quickly use them to wound you further. So, how can we know when it’s right to be vulnerable and when it’s right to hold back?

As you reflect upon the vulnerability of Jesus, in what ways does his example inform your life and leadership? Where does it challenge or unsettle you?

Act

Pray about how you might exercise wise vulnerability in your life and/or leadership. Follow the lead of the Spirit as God guides you in following the example of Jesus.

Pray

Gracious God, once again we are struck by the vulnerability of Jesus. Once again we are challenged to follow him is ways that make us uncomfortable. Once again we ask for your help in doing this.

Give us wisdom, Lord, about what vulnerability should look like in our lives. Teach us how to be appropriately vulnerable in the different contexts of our lives. Help us to abandon our pride and our fear, to sacrifice our egos not only for the good of our team, but also for the good of your kingdom. Teach us how to follow Jesus in his vulnerability, so that you might be honored and your work done through us. Amen.


Part 9: A Moving Example of Vulnerable Leadership

Scripture – Luke 2:6-7 (NRSV)

While they were there, the time came for her to deliver her child. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in bands of cloth, and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

You can read all of Luke 2:1-7 here.

Focus

Today’s devotion focuses on a moving and timely example of vulnerable leadership.

Devotion

In yesterday’s devotion I talked about living and leading vulnerably. I suggested that when we’re dealing with a pandemic, racial injustice, and other major challenges, leadership requires vulnerability. There is no other way, no safe path.

The shadows of two people in front of the MLK Jr. memorial, looking at a quote which reads "If we are to have peace on earth, our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, and our nation; and this means we must develop a world perspective."Today, I’d like to share with you a moving example of vulnerable leadership. I became aware of this example just a couple of days ago as I was listening to an NPR podcast. The podcast hosts, Steve Inskeep and Noel King, were focusing on the recent protests in Minneapolis associated with the killing of George Floyd.

King reported on a conversation she had with Pastor Brian Herron of Zion Baptist Church in Minneapolis. She said, “He remembers the civil rights movement and he told me at first, you know, this violence is evil. It should stop. But I got the feeling that he was not telling me the whole truth. So I just asked him a direct question. Is there any part of you that still wants to get out there and burn something down?”

Pastor Herron’s answer was striking: “Oh, please. All day, every day. But for God. But for God – that he makes the difference in my life. Man, you think I’m not mad enough to tear something up, to hurt some folk? But what good would that do? Who would that serve? What purpose would it serve?”

What I found so impressive about Pastor Herron’s statement was his willingness to be so vulnerable. He shared deep, personal, painful feelings in a place where they would be heard throughout the nation. He was putting himself out there honestly and with substantial risk. Yes, a part of him wants to “tear something up, to hurt some folk.” But his faith in God keeps him from acting on those feelings.

Pastor Herron has a track record of vulnerability in his effort to serve his congregation and community. Recently, he has been literally on the front lines of the protests in Minneapolis as someone calling both for justice and for peaceful protests. Talk about vulnerability. He surely has many detractors. Yet Pastor Herron has not pulled back.

I do not know Pastor Brian Herron personally. I hope one day I’ll get to meet him. But today I’m moved by his example of vulnerable leadership. He demonstrates the sort of leadership we need today, with vulnerability that reflects the vulnerability of Jesus. May I also be willing to put myself out there for the sake of God’s justice, peace, and love.

Reflect

When have you witnessed vulnerability in a leader? How did this strike you?

Have you ever felt pulled in opposite directions, rather like Pastor Herron? Have there been times when you wanted to do something as a leader but God gave you the strength to make a better choice? If so, what was this experience like for you?

Act

Talk with a trusted friend about your leadership and how you might risk greater vulnerability. See if you can come up with one specific thing you might do next week as an expression of Christ-like vulnerability.

Pray

Lord Jesus, again we thank you for your vulnerability, for coming among us as a helpless baby. Thank you for your willingness to be weak and needy for our sake.

Thank you also, Lord, for the example of Pastor Herron. Thank you for his openness and for his solid commitment to you. Help him and others like him as they seek both justice and peace. I pray for these leaders today, that you will encourage, empower, and protect them. Use them to lead us all in the direction of your kingdom.

Help me, Lord, to be a vulnerable leader. Give me the courage to put myself out there for you and your kingdom purposes. Amen.


Part 10: Affirming All Ages

Scripture – Luke 2:36-38 (NRSV)

There was also a prophet, Anna the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was of a great age, having lived with her husband seven years after her marriage, then as a widow to the age of eighty-four. She never left the temple but worshiped there with fasting and prayer night and day. At that moment she came, and began to praise God and to speak about the child to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem.

For more context, read all of Luke 2:25-38.

Focus

The stories of Simeon and Anna in Luke 2 remind us that God includes senior adults in his kingdom work. No matter your age, no matter your gender, no matter your position in life, no matter your socio-economic status, no matter your race or ethnicity, you matter to God and God’s plans. God has called you into relationship with him and into his service. If you offer yourself to God, he will use you and bless you in ways you can only begin to imagine.

Devotion

An old woman in a hoodToday we press on in our Life for Leaders series: Following Jesus Today. Yesterday, I reflected on the vulnerability of the baby Jesus and some implications for our life and leadership. Today we look several verses later in Luke 2, seeing how God implicitly affirms the value of all ages as essential in his kingdom purposes.

The fact that God entered this world as a baby makes a powerful statement about the role of young people in God’s work in this world. This statement is reiterated during the ministry of Jesus, when he welcomes children and says that we must become like children if we’re going to enter the kingdom of God (Matt 18:3-5).

Ironically, the same chapter of Luke that features a baby places explicitly includes older people in co-starring roles. When Jesus’s parents brought him to the temple to be presented to the Lord, they encountered Simeon, a righteous man who would soon die of old age. Simeon offered public praise for Jesus and his saving mission (2:25-32). At this same time, Anna, who was known to be a prophet, approached. She also began to praise God openly because of the redemption that would come through Jesus. Luke makes it very clear that Anna was “of a great age” having lived to 84 years (which was truly exceptional in the first century; 2:36-37).

Luke could well have told this story without emphasizing the ages of Simeon and Anna. But by making sure we know how old they were, Luke shows that God’s work in this world includes those who are older as well as those who are younger.

Now, in the time of Jesus, older people were generally treated with considerable honor and respect. This continues to be true today in some cultures. But, by and large, American culture values youth rather than seniority. This is often true even in church. When we describe churches as “filled with gray hair,” we don’t mean this as a compliment. Rather, it’s a problem, a liability. Though I absolutely agree that we need to help churches to grow younger, I believe that “seasoned adults” like Simeon and Anna, are an essential part of the solution. (Of course I am biased because of the color of my own hair! But if you don’t believe me, check out the research and wisdom of my Fuller colleagues in the Fuller Youth Institute. In their landmark book Growing Young, they show how much senior adults can contribute to churches that are growing with younger people. If you haven’t read this book, I highly recommend it. )

I should mention here that the De Pree Center, where I work, is beginning a new initiative focused on serving people in the third third of life. We take seriously the biblical vision of the righteous flourishing “in old age” (Psalm 92:12-14). We are encouraged by the stories of Simeon and Anna to believe that God is doing and will do amazing things through third third folk, as well as through babies, children, teenagers, young adults, mature adults, and, well, you name it. (You can learn more about our third third initiative and sign up to receive third third resources here.)

No matter your age, no matter your gender, no matter your position in life, no matter your socio-economic status, no matter your race or ethnicity, you matter to God and God’s plan. God has called you into relationship with him and into his service. If you offer yourself to God, he will use you and bless you in ways you can only begin to imagine.

Reflect

How do you think and feel about older adults (whether you are one yourself, or whether you have many years before you enter the third third of life)?

In what ways have you experienced the impact of third thirders? You might think of grandparents, mentors, church leaders, neighbors, etc.

If you are in the third third of life now, do you believe that God wants to do great things in you and through you? If so, why? If not, why not?

Act

Talk with your small group or with a good friend about your thoughts and feelings related to aging. Consider ways you might become more aligned with the biblical vision of the third third of life.

Pray

Gracious God, thank you for giving us the stories of Simeon and Anna. Among other things, they help us to see how you value older adults and their participation in your kingdom.

Lord, as you know, most of us live in a culture that tends not to value senior adults. We might even think of them mainly as problems to be dealt with. Help us to see third third folk as you see them, to celebrate their giftedness, to draw upon their wisdom, to contribute to their flourishing.

And if we are in the third third of life, may we offer ourselves fully to you, knowing that you will bless us and use us for your kingdom purposes. Amen.


Part 11: The Truly Human Jesus

Scripture – Luke 2:39-40 (NRSV)

When they had finished everything required by the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth. The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom; and the favor of God was upon him.

Focus

One reason the full humanity of Jesus matters is that it means he understands our experience. He knows what it’s like to skin your knee, hit your thumb with a hammer, be teased by the kids in the neighborhood, and all that other things that can make up ordinary human life. Jesus gets it when our work is tedious or overly demanding. He knows how difficult relationships can be, whether with family members or co-workers. With Jesus, we are following one who understands.

Devotion

A crying toddler on a forest pathLuke 2:39-40 tells us briefly what happened with Jesus after he and his parents returned to their hometown of Nazareth. Over many years (implied), Jesus grew up and became physically strong (in part, no doubt, through helping his father carry boards, stones, and other building materials). He was also “filled with wisdom” and “the favor of God was upon him” (2:40). Strength, wisdom, and divine favor were abundant in Jesus, as we would expect of such a special boy. But, in reality, any faithful Jewish parent in the first-century A.D. would have wanted these blessings for their children. In fact, we who are parents today want these very things for our own children.

As I read Luke 2:40, I must confess a measure of unfulfilled longing. I’m glad for what Luke tells us, but wish I knew more about the life of Jesus. I wonder what he was really like in person, what made him laugh, what he did with his friends, what he learned from his parents and others in his village.

In the early centuries of Christianity, some imaginative folk actually made up stories about the early life of Jesus. They were often fantastic, picturing Jesus as a wonder-working prodigy. One of my favorite stories appears in the so-called Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, which was written perhaps in the 7th century A.D. In Chapter 18 of this “gospel,” as the baby Jesus and his parents were on their way to Egypt, we read: “And having come to a certain cave, and wishing to rest in it, the blessed Mary dismounted from her beast, and sat down with the child Jesus in her bosom. And there were with Joseph three boys, and with Mary a girl, going on the journey along with them. And, lo, suddenly there came forth from the cave many dragons; and when the children saw them, they cried out in great terror. Then Jesus went down from the bosom of His mother, and stood on His feet before the dragons; and they adored Jesus, and thereafter retired.” Then the infant Jesus explained to his parents that “all the beasts of the forest must needs be tame before me.” Not bad for a baby in the first few weeks of his life!

As entertaining as this story and others like it may be, they tell us little about the real life of the real Jesus. In fact, they distort one of the most central and precious truths about Jesus, namely, that he was “truly God and truly human” (in the words of the fifth-century Chalcedonian Definition). Though, as we’ll see in tomorrow’s devotion, Jesus was exceptional in many ways, he was also a true human being who did not possess at birth the ability to command dragons to behave.

Why does this matter to us if we are seeking to follow Jesus today? There are many reasons. One of the main ones is that the full humanity of Jesus makes possible our being saved through him, and we follow Jesus not in order to be saved but in response to salvation given by grace. Another reason the full humanity of Jesus matters is that it means he understands our experience. He knows what it’s like to skin your knee, hit your thumb with a hammer, be teased by the kids in the neighborhood, and all that other things that can make up ordinary human life. Jesus gets it when our work is tedious or overly demanding. He understands what it’s like to work long hours or to deal with cranky customers. He knows how difficult relationships can be, whether with family members or co-workers. With Jesus, we are following one who understands us because he was fully human as well as fully divine.

Reflect

How do you respond to the description of Jesus’s life in Luke 2:40? What do you think? How do you feel?

When you picture Jesus as a boy, what do you see?

Why do you suppose it is sometimes difficult for Christians to acknowledge the full humanity of Jesus?

Act

Take some time in prayer to talk to Jesus about the “ordinary” things in your life, the things you might not regard as “spiritual enough” for prayer. Talk with Jesus about your work and what you love (or hate) about it. Tell him about your friends or family. See if you can be with Jesus as with a friend (John 15:15).

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for the biblical gospels. They give us what we need to know in order to follow you faithfully in this life. They are a precious, indeed, a priceless gift. Thank you!

Yet, Lord, we would confess that we wish we had more information about you, your growing up, your day-to-day challenges and adventures, your close relationships, your experience of work. Perhaps in the age to come we’ll get to watch the video of your life someday!

In the meanwhile, Jesus, help us to remember and to embrace your full humanity. Yes, you are truly God, but also truly human. You have experienced human life from the inside out. This means you understand us empathically and intimately. You understand me, my joys and loves, my fears and longings. May this truth give me freedom to follow you openly, faithfully, and fearlessly. May it help me to share my heart with you unhesitatingly. Amen.


Part 12: Raising Children Together

Scripture – Luke 2:48 (NRSV)

When his parents saw him they were astonished; and his mother said to him, “Child, why have you treated us like this? Look, your father and I have been searching for you in great anxiety.”

For context, you may wish to read the whole story from which this verse comes: Luke 2:41-51.

Focus

Whether we have children of our own or not, we all should participate in the crucial task of raising children to be mature disciples of Jesus. Parents bear a primary responsibility, of course. But we who seek to follow Jesus must share with parents in the work of nurturing, teaching, forming, and loving children.

Devotion

Luke 2:41-51 shows us one scene from the boyhood of Jesus. When he was twelve years old, he went with his parents and neighbors to Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover. After the festivities, Jesus’s group headed for home, but Jesus remained in Jerusalem. His parents assumed Jesus was with some of the others from Nazareth, so they didn’t fret when they didn’t see Jesus as they began their trip home. But, a day into their journey, Mary and Joseph discovered that Jesus wasn’t with their group. Deeply distressed, they hurried back to Jerusalem to look for Jesus.

Heinrich Hofmann, painting “Jesus Among the Doctors” (1884).

Heinrich Hofmann, painting “Jesus Among the Doctors” (1884).

A couple of days later they found him sitting in the temple courts, talking with a cluster of Jewish teachers. In astonishment they cried out, “Child, why have you treated us like this? Look, your father and I have been searching for you in great anxiety” (Luke 2:48). Jesus answered by saying, “Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” (Luke 2:49). His parents didn’t really understand his answer, but he went home with them and “was obedient to them.” Later, after Mary calmed down, she “treasured all these things in her heart” (Luke 2:50-51).

This is an extraordinary story, one I have loved from my childhood. I remember vividly the classic painting of Heinrich Hofmann, called in English “Jesus Among the Doctors” (1884). That painting adorned many walls of my Sunday school, no doubt encouraging me and my fellow learners to be like Jesus in our own studies. Of course now I see that painting of a glowing, white-skinned Jesus with different eyes, noting that it fails to represent accurately the ethnicity and humanity of Jesus. But I also hear the story of Jesus among the doctors differently because I am now a parent, not a boy wanting freedom and adventure. I relate to the painful anxiety of Jesus’s parents more than I aspire to be like Jesus the model student.

As surprising as it is to us that Jesus didn’t bother to tell his parents he was sticking around in Jerusalem for a few days, it is perhaps more shocking that Jesus’s parents allowed this to happen. What is this—Home Alone: The Gospel Version? How could Mary and Joseph have headed to Nazareth without Jesus in their sight? What were they thinking? Were they terribly irresponsible parents?

No, not if we consider their cultural context. Luke tells us that Jesus’s parents did not know that he had stayed behind in Jerusalem because they were “assuming that he was in the group of travelers” (Luke 2:44). For Joseph and Mary, raising a child was something to be shared with others, with a community of relatives, friends, neighbors, and fellow worshipers. They had such confidence in the “group of travelers” and, for that matter, in Jesus, that they felt sure he was somewhere among their traveling party. In their time and place, they were living the familiar African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child.”

Much could be learned from the story of Jesus and the doctors. But the one thing I want to underscore today has to do with raising children. It is a community endeavor. It’s something we do as a “village.” I know many cultures still practice parenting in this mode. My own culture tends to view childrearing as almost entirely and exclusively something parents do, perhaps with some help from schools and churches. Of course I am not downplaying parental responsibility when it comes to our own children, not in the least. But I do believe we have much to learn when it comes to sharing in the task of bringing up children to be mature adults who know and serve the Lord. Whether we have children of our own or not, we must all participate together in the formation of young people as whole-life disciples of Jesus. This is part of what it means for us to follow Jesus today.

Reflect

As you read the story of “Jesus Among the Doctors,” how do you respond? What strikes you as interesting? Worrisome? Encouraging?

In your own experience, how have you seen the raising of children as something shared by a Christian community? Were there people in your life, besides your own parents, who helped you to grow up well as a follower of Jesus?

In what way (or ways) are you participating today in your community’s effort to raise children well?

Act

In a time when many of us are still social distancing, it may be hard for you to do something tangible in response to today’s devotion. Perhaps you might drop a note of encouragement to parents who are part of your own community, to encourage them in their parental endeavors.

Pray

Gracious God, thank you for giving us this snapshot into the family life of Jesus. There is so much in this story for us to reflect upon.

Today, we want to thank you for the fact that raising children is meant to be a shared task. For sure, parents carry a primary responsibility. But they are to carry this with others in their community. So, no matter whether we have children of our own or not, help us to share with parents in their crucial duty. May we find ways to encourage and support them. Show us what we can do with children, to help them grow to maturity as your disciples.

One thing we can do is to pray for parents. This is always needed, but especially in a time of “safer at home.” We can think of parents who have been working full-time, parenting-full time, and taking care of household business full-time. We can feel how tired and overwhelmed they are. We ask you, Lord, to given them strength and wisdom. Help them to find gifts of grace in these moments. Reassure them with your presence. Bring into their lives – even virtually – those who can encourage them and share in their parenting task. Amen.


Part 13: Use Your Power Justly

Scripture – Luke 3:12-14 (NRSV)

Even tax collectors came to be baptized, and they asked him, “Teacher, what should we do?” He said to them, “Collect no more than the amount prescribed for you.” Soldiers also asked him, “And we, what should we do?” He said to them, “Do not extort money from anyone by threats or false accusation, and be satisfied with your wages.”

You can read all of Luke’s description of John the Baptist’s ministry here.

Focus

The ministry of John the Baptist in the New Testament teaches us to exercise justice in every part of life. In particular, we should use justly the power given to us, whether we are business owners or managers, teachers or pastors, police officers or mayors, parents or grandparents, soldiers or senators. We who seek to follow Jesus today will use our power in the way of Jesus, seeking God’s justice in all we do.

Devotion

In the third chapter of Luke’s gospel, John the Baptist launched his distinctive ministry of preaching and baptism. Crowds of people came to hear John and to be baptized by him, including those you might not have expected. Tax collectors and soldiers, not exactly people associated with godliness, responded to John’s message and sought baptism. Sensing that they needed to live differently, they asked John, “Teacher, what should we do?” (Luke 3:12).

Photo of the Jordan River, at the location where tradition holds that John baptized Jesus. © 2011 Mark D. Roberts.

to John’s answer, let’s think about the historical reality behind this scene. Both tax collectors and soldiers in first-century Galilee had considerable power and quite a bit of freedom in the way they exercised this power. Tax collectors could charge people much more than was required, pocketing the difference for themselves, and there was nothing the taxpayers could do about it. Soldiers could use their might to extort money from people who had no option but to pay up. Though the details differed, what both of these cases had in common was the unjust exercise of power. Tax collectors and soldiers had power to exceed their authority so as to steal from people. Tax collectors and soldiers could use their power unjustly and get away with it.

John understood this context and responded accordingly to the tax collectors: “Collect no more than the amount prescribed for you” (Luke 3:13). To the soldiers he said, “Do not extort money from anyone by threats or false accusation, and be satisfied with your wages” (Luke 3:14). If we were to summarize John’s instructions, he said in effect, “Do not use your power unjustly.” Or, we could put it positively, “Use your power justly.”

Among those who read Life for Leaders, we may very well have actual tax collectors and soldiers, people who would John’s words as if spoken directly to them. But I’m quite sure that most of us in the Life for Leaders community, no matter our jobs, have some kind of power. We may own companies or provide management in companies owned by others. We may be teachers, mayors, or police officers. We might be pastors, contractors, or attorneys. We may be mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, or grandparents. For those of us who have some kind of power, we need to hear the essence of John’s exhortation: “Use your power justly.”

Notice, by the way, that John was not addressing situations we might think of as personal. He wasn’t telling folks how to behave at home or at the synagogue. Rather, he was speaking about their work—their ordinary, everyday, public work as tax collectors and soldiers. John assumed that those he baptized should live in a new way in every part of life, including their daily work. Thus, as we consider the call to use our own power justly, we mustn’t think this is relevant only at home or church. Rather, what John proclaimed, and what Jesus reinforced through his own ministry, touches every part of our lives.

If we are going to follow Jesus today, therefore, we will seek to use justly whatever power we have. We will live for God’s purposes and justice in all we do.

Reflect

How do you respond to the call of John the Baptist?

In what parts of life do you have power?

Can you think of times you have used your power unjustly?

What might you do differently in response to the call of John?

Act

Talk with your small group or a good friend about how you might use your power justly. Then, do something tangible in response to what you have discussed.

Pray

Gracious God, thank you for the ministry of John the Baptist. In particular, thank you for his exhortation to the tax collectors and soldiers. Though we are in quite a different situation from these first-century people, we have been given power, and can use it for good or evil. Help us, Lord, not to abuse our power. Rather, help us to use our power justly.

In particular, we ask that you will help us to do this in our daily work. By your Spirit, give us eyes to see how we might live out your call to justice in all we do each day. Amen.


Part 14: God Loves You and Delights in You

Scripture – Luke 3:21-22 (NRSV)

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

Focus

Though you probably won’t hear a heavenly voice today as Jesus did when he was baptized, the good news is still crystal clear. Through Jesus, the beloved Son, you are God’s daughter or son. God loves you more than you will ever fully comprehend. God delights in you and claims you as his own.

Devotion

The Grand Tetons at sunsetThe baptism of Jesus must have been quite a spectacle. Even before Jesus showed up, John the Baptist drew the crowds with his prophetic preaching and dramatic baptisms. But when Jesus appeared one day to be baptized, several astounding things happened. First of all, the heavens opened. (Forgive me for picturing the wormhole above New York in the first Avengers film.) Then the Holy Spirit descended from heaven “in bodily form like a dove.” (Wouldn’t you love to have seen that!) Finally, a voice from heaven, God’s own voice, said, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased” (Luke 3:22).

We can only begin to imagine what that experience was like for Jesus. Surely he had learned from his parents about his unique calling and birth. They must have passed on to Jesus what they had learned from the angel. We don’t know how Jesus experienced his Heavenly Father throughout his life, though we rightly suppose that this was a deeply intimate relationship. But, as far as we know, it was at his baptism that Jesus heard for the first time the words, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.” Did Jesus feel surprised? Affirmed? Overwhelmed? Special? Deeply loved? All of the above and much more?

I have no doubt that my own father loved me and was pleased with me. But he had a very difficult time expressing his love in words. I can still feel the awkwardness when he would respond “I love you, too” to my words, “I love you, Dad.” I know my dad was proud of me. But he could never just say it. The words “With you I am well pleased” didn’t escape from his mouth, though I know they were in his heart.

Thus, when I read Luke’s account of Jesus’s baptism, I find in myself a deep yearning for affirmation from a father. I won’t be able to get that in this life from my dad because he’s been with the Lord for over 30 years. But, as I reflect, I realize that what I want most of all is to know that my Heavenly Father is pleased with me. I want to know that I am his beloved. Of course I realize that the Father’s love for Jesus was unique. But I also know that, through Jesus the Son of God, the Father loves me (John 14:21-23; John 16:27; 1 John 3:1). I need this knowledge to percolate down from my head to my heart (Romans 5:5).

Honestly, I wouldn’t mind a voice from heaven affirming the Father’s love for me. Perhaps you feel similarly. But, whether or not that ever happens, we hold on tight to the good news of God’s love for us in Jesus Christ. We believe that the God who knows us through and through has adopted us to be his beloved children (Ephesians 1:5). We claim the promise of Psalm 149:4, affirming that “the LORD takes pleasure in his people,” and, through Christ, that includes you and me.

So, though you probably won’t hear a heavenly voice today as Jesus did when he was baptized, the good news is still crystal clear. Through Jesus, the beloved Son, you are God’s daughter or son. God loves you more than you will ever fully comprehend. God delights in you and claims you as his own.

Reflect

When you read the story of Jesus’s baptism, what strikes you? What do you think? How do you feel?

In what ways have you experienced God’s love?

Do you believe that God takes pleasure in you? If so, why? If not, why not?

Act

Ask your Heavenly Father to give you a deeper experience of his love for you and his pleasure in you. Pay attention to how God answers this prayer.

Pray

Heavenly Father, we marvel as we read about the baptism of Jesus. How amazing it must have been for those who witnessed that spectacle. And how amazing for Jesus to hear of your special love and delight in him.

Father, I believe the good news of your love for me in Jesus Christ. Nothing is more important to me in life. Yet, there are times when my heart aches to experience your love in a deeper way. So I ask that you might once again pour your love into my heart through the Holy Spirit (Rom 5:5). May I know, almost as if I actually heard your voice, that you love me and take pleasure in me. Amen.


Part 15: Living for God’s Pleasure

Scripture – Luke 3:21-22 (NRSV)

Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

Focus

When we use well the gifts God has given us, God is pleased. When we do our daily work as an offering to God, this gives God pleasure. When we seek justice in all of our relationships, whether at work or home, in our community or our church, in our city or our nation, God delights. If we’re going to follow Jesus today, we will offer all that we are to God, all that we do and say, all of the time for his pleasure and glory.

Devotion

A father holding and kssing his toddler sonAfter Jesus was baptized, a voice from heaven proclaimed, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased” (Luke 3:22). The Heavenly Father loved Jesus, his unique son, and took pleasure in him. As Jesus’s ministry transitioned from carpentry to preaching, he would live in a new way for the pleasure of his Heavenly Father, proclaiming and demonstrating the Kingdom of God.

Though you and I do not have the unique messianic calling of Jesus, we are also meant to live for God’s pleasure. As Paul wrote to the Thessalonians, “You learned from us how you ought to live and to please God” (1 Thessalonians 4:1). In our efforts to please God, however, sometimes we think of this far too narrowly. Pleasing God can be mainly a matter of going to church, praying, working for justice in our spare time, and sharing the good news with others. To be sure, these things delight the Lord. But pleasing God includes far more.

Of the thousands of sermon illustrations I’ve heard in my life, one stands out as the most popular of all. I expect I’ve heard at least thirty different sermons recount a classic scene from the 1981 film, Chariots of Fire. (My guess is that many of you already know exactly what I’m about to write!) That movie tells the story of Eric Liddell, the famed Olympic sprinter and Christian missionary to China. As a young man, Liddell wrestled with his calling, wondering whether to be an athlete or a missionary. Finally he decided that God was calling him to both. As he explained to his sister, “I believe that God made me for a purpose, for China. But he also made me fast. And when I run I feel His pleasure!”

Eric Liddell understood that his whole life was for God’s pleasure. Surely he would please God through his missionary work in China. But Liddell also knew that he could delight the Lord by using the physical gifts God had given him. Indeed, his calling was to live his whole life for God’s pleasure and purpose.

And so it is for you and me. When we use well the gifts God has given us, God is pleased. When we do our daily work as an offering to God, this gives God pleasure. When we seek justice in all of our relationships, whether at work or home, in our community or our church, God delights. If we’re going to follow Jesus today, we will offer all that we are to God, all that we do and say, all of the time for his pleasure and glory.

Reflect

When are you conscious of living for God’s pleasure?

Do you ever think of your daily work as pleasing to God? If so, why? If not, why not?

How might you live and work differently if you were to do everything for God’s pleasure?

Act

Watch this scene from Chariots of Firehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ile5PD34SS0. How do you respond to it? What do you think? What do you feel? Could you ever say something like Eric Liddell said to his sister? Why or why not?

Pray

Gracious God, thank you again for loving us. Thank you for taking delight in us. Thank you for allowing us to live for your pleasure.

Help us, Lord, to understand what pleases you. May we come to see all of life as what matters to you. May we learn to live each moment for your pleasure, using all the gifts, talents, and opportunities you have entrusted to us. Amen.


Part 16: When You Are Tempted

Scripture – Luke 4:1-2 (NRSV)

Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness, where for forty days he was tempted by the devil.

For context, read Luke 4:1-13 here.

Focus

In the Gospel of Luke, Jesus is tempted by the devil. Scripture teaches us that this was real temptation. Jesus felt strongly the pull of opposite desires. Yet he chose the way of God’s kingdom. The fact that Jesus experienced genuine temptation means that he sympathizes with us when we are tempted. We don’t have to hide in shame. Rather, Scripture invites us to speak openly of our struggles so that we might be helped by God’s mercy and grace given through Jesus.

Devotion

A hand reaching for a brownie on a plateAfter Jesus was baptized and the Holy Spirit came upon him, the Spirit led Jesus into the wilderness, “where for forty days he was tempted by the devil” (Luke 4:2). The following verses describe the specific temptations Jesus faced and how he overcame them by drawing strength and guidance from Scripture. In each of the temptations, the devil tried to get Jesus to use his unique identity as the Son of God for his own benefit. Yet Jesus refused, remaining committed to the mission to which God had called him.

For much of my life, as I read this story I was surprisingly unimpressed. Of course Jesus didn’t give in to the devil’s illicit invitations. He was the Son of God, after all, God in human flesh. He had superhuman strength to defeat the devil’s schemes. To be honest, I didn’t really believe that Jesus was truly tempted. His temptations seemed formal or formulaic, not genuine and heartfelt. I did not understand that Jesus was actually wrestling with the meaning of his messianic calling. He was rejecting the obvious and expected path of glorious kingship, choosing instead the enigmatic and unexpected way of sacrificial servanthood. For Jesus, this wasn’t merely a thought experiment. It was a heartfelt, gut-wrenching challenge.

In the New Testament letter to the Hebrews we find theological reflection on the temptation of Jesus: “Since, then, we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens, Jesus, the Son of God, let us hold fast to our confession. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who in every respect has been tested as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore approach the throne of grace with boldness, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:14-16). The NRSV uses the word “tested” where other translations (NIV, KJV, CEB) go with “tempted”. Either way, the point is that Jesus was tempted/tested “in every respect . . . as we are,” though he never sinned. Whether in the wilderness or the workshop, whether alone or with others, Jesus was truly tempted. He felt the conflict of desires we know so well. He felt the temptations that are so familiar to us.

This means, according to Hebrews, that Jesus can “sympathize with our weaknesses” (Hebrews 4:15). He really understands what it’s like to be us when we are tempted. For this reason, when we are tempted we don’t have to hide from Jesus in shame. Rather, we can “approach the throne of grace with boldness” (Hebrews 4:16). We can tell Jesus what’s really going on with us without holding back. As we do, we will “receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:16). Jesus not only understands, but also supplies what we need to say “No” to temptation and “Yes” to God’s kingdom.

Reflect

As you read about Jesus’s temptation in Luke, how do you respond? What thoughts do you have? What questions are stirred up? What feelings?

Do you believe Jesus was really tempted? Do you think he actually felt the desire to do what was not right? Why or why not?

How free are you to let the Lord know when you are tempted? What might help you to become even freer to do this in the future?

Act

Take some time to think about your experience of temptation. Then talk to the Lord about what you’re thinking. Be honest! Ask for God’s help to say no to the temptations that are most common in your life. Ask for wisdom about how to avoid these temptations.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for understanding us to thoroughly. Thank you for knowing what it feels like to be tempted. Thank you for inviting me to be honest with you about my temptations. Thank you for the promise of help in my time of need.

Dear Lord, I do ask for your help today. You know the temptations that are so familiar and powerful in my life. I ask you to give me the strength to say “No” to them. Like you, may I draw from the power of your Word. May my calling give me the clarity to reject sin and follow you. Help me, Lord, to be more and more like you each day. Amen.


Part 17: More Shocking Than Iron Man

Scripture – Luke 4:17-21 (NRSV)

[The] scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to [Jesus]. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” And he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant, and sat down. The eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him. Then he began to say to them, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.”

For context, you can read all of Luke 4:16-30 here.

Focus

In Luke 4, Jesus makes a shocking claim. He is the anointed one foretold in the prophecy of Isaiah. He has come to bring good news to the poor, to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind. Jesus has come to free the oppressed and announce the time of God’s favor. What Jesus began so many years ago he continues to do today through those who follow him faithfully and are filled with his Spirit.

Devotion

A young boy looking at an Iron Man toy on a tableAt the conclusion of the 2008 blockbuster film Iron Man, Tony Stark is conducting a press conference. He is reading from a carefully produced script in which he will deny unequivocally that he has any connection with the mysterious superhero called Iron Man. Yet, at the press conference Stark is confronted with unanticipated questions. He tries to explain that he could not be a superhero: “That would be outlandish and . . . fantastic. . . . I’m just not the hero type, clearly.” Then, after reflecting for a moment, Tony Stark goes on, “The truth is . . . [pause] . . . I am Iron Man.” Pandemonium breaks out in the press conference and the movie ends.

This is surely one of the more shocking confessions in recent movie history. (What’s even more surprising is that, according to the script, Tony Stark was not supposed to reveal Iron Man’s true identity. Robert Downey Jr., the actor playing Start, did it on a lark and it ended up in the film.) Yes, it was quite something for Stark to admit to being Iron Man. Yet I would suggest that Jesus did something even more astounding in Luke 4. Of course, this confession has the added advantage of having actually happened in our universe, not the fictional Marvel Cinematic Universe.

One Sabbath day, as he was in the synagogue of his hometown, Nazareth, Jesus read from the scroll of the Old Testament prophet Isaiah. The passage, either chosen by Jesus or assigned to him, was the beginning of Isaiah 61, “The spirit of the Lord is upon me. . . .” This passage was treasured among Jews in the time of Jesus as a prophecy of the coming anointed one, or in anglicized Hebrew, the messiah. He would be empowered by God’s spirit to transform the world, especially for the poor, captives, blind, and oppressed. Many Jews in the first-century yearned for the coming of God’s special representative, who would set them free from Roman oppression and establish the time of “the Lord’s favor.”

The fact that Jesus read from Isaiah 61 was not particularly stunning. But what he said next was truly shocking: “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing” (Luke 4:21). In effect, Jesus was saying, “I am the anointed one from Isaiah’s prophecy. I am the one who will bring freedom, salvation, and favor. I am the one.” The response to this bold confession was not, as in the film Iron Man, immediate pandemonium. At first the listeners were impressed. But, before long, pandemonium showed up as they tried to throw Jesus off a cliff (Luke 4:28-30). Jesus’s neighbors were ultimately shocked by what he had said, and they were not happy.

So much could be said about this crucial passage from Luke 4. I’ll reflect some more on it tomorrow. Today, I’d like to encourage you to let Jesus’s reading from Isaiah sink in. See the suggestions for Reflect and Act below.

Reflect

When you read Luke 4:18-21 (the New Testament version of Isaiah 61:1-2), how do you respond?

In many places in the New Testament gospels, Jesus is reticent to say who he is. Why do you think he was so clear and bold in today’s passage?

If Luke 4:18-19 lays out Jesus’s mission, what might this mean for those of us who are seeking to following Jesus today?

Act

Set apart at least five minutes for reflection time. Read Luke several times, slowly and prayerfully. Pay attention to what stands out to you. What do you hear God saying to you today through this text?

Pray

Gracious Lord, as I read this passage from Luke, I find myself wishing I could have been there in the synagogue that day. It would have been amazing – okay, even shocking – to hear you read from Isaiah and then claim to be the one about whom Isaiah had prophesied. I wonder how I would have responded. Would I have been amazed? Impressed? Open? Or would I soon have joined the crowd that tried to kill you?

Now matter how I might have responded then, the main point is how I respond now. Show me, Jesus, how I should follow you today. Show me what it means to share in your mission to the poor, captives, blind, and oppressed. May my heart be open to what you are saying to me even now. Call me once again, Lord, to follow you. Amen.


Part 18: Celebrating and Striving

Scripture – Luke 4:17-21 (NRSV)

[The] scroll of the prophet Isaiah was given to [Jesus]. He unrolled the scroll and found the place where it was written: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me to bring good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.” And he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant, and sat down. The eyes of all in the synagogue were fixed on him. Then he began to say to them, “Today this scripture has been fulfilled in your hearing.”

For context, you can read all of Luke 4:16-30 here.

Focus

Through his death on the cross, Jesus conquered sin and brought us into new life. Individually, we are saved by God’s grace given through Christ. Yet the death of Christ also brought peace to a broken world. It forged reconciliation between divided and hostile peoples. It made possible the experience of God’s peace in this world, a peace infused by justice, shaped by love, and embodied in unity. We who follow Jesus celebrate what he accomplished on the cross. We also commit ourselves to joining his mission on earth until that day when God’s kingdom is complete and all things and all peoples are united in Christ.

Devotion

Freedwoman’s Hand Sculpture by Adrienne Isom, Juneteenth Memorial Monument, Austin, Texas.

Freedwoman’s Hand Sculpture by Adrienne Isom, Juneteenth Memorial Monument, Austin, Texas.

Throughout the centuries, followers of Jesus have tried to figure out exactly how Jesus fulfilled the messianic words of Isaiah and other Old Testament prophets. Jesus did not, after all, do what many expected him to do: raise up an army to expel the Romans from Judea so that he might reign over God’s earthly kingdom. What, then, did he accomplish? How did he fulfill the messianic job description found in Isaiah?

Many have interpreted Jesus’s use of Isaiah in a metaphorical or spiritualized way. Jesus brings good news, not to the materially poor, but to the poor in spirit. He releases captives caught in sin and spiritual bondage. He heals those who are “blind” by revealing God’s truth. He frees all who are oppressed by the guilt that comes from sin. As a boy growing up in church, I was taught that this is what Jesus meant when he claimed to fulfill the prophecy of Isaiah. That made sense to me because I experienced the salvation of Jesus in this non-literal mode.

But as I have studied Scripture more carefully, especially the Old Testament prophets, and as I have examined closely the teachings and works of Jesus, I have come to believe that my early understanding of Jesus’s mission was too narrow. Yes, he surely offers salvation to those who are spiritually poor, captive, blind, and oppressed. But also Jesus proclaimed and inaugurated the reign of God on earth. He came to offer deliverance to those who were literally poor, captive, blind, and oppressed. His messianic work was not limited in the mode of my upbringing. It was far more widespread and far deeper. Ultimately, as Jesus broke the power of sin through his death on the cross, he brought not only individual salvation, but also the full peace of God, including justice, reconciliation, and restoration. (See, for example, Ephesians 2:1-22.)

The world-changing work of Jesus has begun, to be sure. In this we rejoice, but there is still much more to be done as Jesus works today through those who follow him. The complete reign of God will come only through God’s own effort. We don’t make God’s kingdom come. But, as we wait for the fullness of the kingdom, we can and should join in the life-changing, world-changing, kingdom-extending mission of Jesus today.

As I try to envision the “already and not yet” work of Jesus, I find a fitting illustration in the holiday known as Juneteenth. On June nineteenth of every year (hence “Juneteenth”) many people celebrate the emancipation of black Americans from slavery. Though the Emancipation Proclamation, which officially ended slavery, became effective on January 1, 1863, many parts of the country did not know this, including Texas. But on June 19, 1865, the people of Texas were officially informed that all slaves were free. Several years later, black people and others in Texas began celebrating “Juneteenth” as a day of freedom. In 1979, Texas made Juneteenth a state holiday. Since then, almost all other states have followed suit. (For an insightful overview of Juneteenth, see this piece by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.)

Juneteenth is, of course, particularly relevant in our time of history, when issues of racial justice are rightly and excruciatingly on the forefront of our consciousness. But I am using this example not only because of its timeliness, but also because it helps us understand the work of Jesus in at least two ways. First of all, Juneteenth reminds us that the mission of Jesus has everything to do with the liberation of people in today’s world. Wherever people are victims of prejudice, held down by racism, and/or oppressed by unjust systems, Jesus and those who follow him faithfully are working for their liberation and flourishing. There are still poor who need good news, captives who need release, blind who need to see, and oppressed who need freedom.

Second, Juneteenth also helps us celebrate even when the work before us isn’t finished. After all, Juneteenth is a celebration of liberation. But this celebration does not imply that liberation for black Americans has been fully accomplished. Yes, the flagrant evil of slavery was abolished, but “liberty and justice for all” is still very much a work in progress. Recent events, protests, and prayer meetings in our country have pointed out just how far we have to go when it comes to defeating racism and its permeating implications.

Through his death on the cross, Jesus conquered sin and brought us into new life. Individually, we are saved by God’s grace given through Christ and received in faith. Yet the death of Christ also brought peace to a broken world. It forged reconciliation between divided and hostile peoples. It made possible the experience of God’s peace in this world, a peace infused by justice, shaped by love, and embodied in unity. We who follow Jesus celebrate what he accomplished on the cross. And we also commit ourselves to joining his mission on earth until that day when God’s kingdom is complete and all things and all peoples are united in Christ (see Ephesians 1:10; 2:1-22). Today, we follow Jesus both in our celebrating and in our striving.

Reflect

How do you understand the mission of Jesus as expressed in Luke 4:18-21?

Why do you suppose that it is easy for us to think of the work of Jesus in limited terms?

How are you participating in Jesus’s work in the world today?

Act

Talk with your small group or a trusted Christian friend about the mission of Jesus and its relevance to your life. Be open to the possibility that God might be calling you to something new.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for fulfilling the vision of Isaiah. Thank you for your work with the poor, the captives, the blind, and the oppressed. Thank you for the wholeness of your salvation, for the fullness of your peace.

Help me, Lord, to follow you in your mission. Give me eyes to see how I might be an instrument of your peace, justice, and love in my part of the world.

Today I join with others who celebrate Juneteenth, thanking you for the emancipation of slaves in America. Yet I also pray for your continued work of liberation. May your justice come for all in this country, especially for black Americans. May their lives matter, not only in words, but also in deeds, in laws, in systems, and in institutions. Help us, Lord, to finish what we have begun as a nation, rejecting the racism that has infected our hearts, minds, and institutions. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Amen.


Part 19: Serving People on the Margins

Scripture – Luke 4:24-27 (NRSV)

And he said, “Truly I tell you, no prophet is accepted in the prophet’s hometown. But the truth is, there were many widows in Israel in the time of Elijah, when the heaven was shut up three years and six months, and there was a severe famine over all the land; yet Elijah was sent to none of them except to a widow at Zarephath in Sidon. There were also many lepers in Israel in the time of the prophet Elisha, and none of them was cleansed except Naaman the Syrian.”

For context, read all of Luke 4:16-30 here.

Focus

Jesus came to bring salvation to the poor, the captives, the blind, and the oppressed (Luke 4:18). He served those on the margins of his own culture and religion, offering God’s grace to all in need. We who seek to follow Jesus will imitate his example. We will reach beyond our comfort zones, seeing and serving people who are not like part of the “in group.” We will seek to share the love and justice of Jesus with all people.

Devotion

Hands gripping a barbed wire fenceLast week I began reflecting on Luke 4:16-30. In this passage, Jesus reads from the prophet Isaiah while attending the synagogue in his hometown of Nazareth. After reading a prophecy about one who is anointed to bring salvation to those who are poor, captive, blind, or oppressed, Jesus announces that this prophecy is being fulfilled in that moment. He is the one about whom Isaiah prophesied.

At first Jesus’s neighbors were impressed. But Jesus, anticipating their desire for him to do the miracles for them that he had done elsewhere, quoted a familiar saying about a prophet not being accepted in the prophet’s hometown (Luke 4:24). Then he brought up examples from two Old Testament prophets, Elijah and Elisha. In both cases, the “insiders” of Israel were in need of God’s help, but the prophets served “outsiders.” Elijah served a Gentile widow (1 Kings 17:8-24). Elisha healed a Gentile leper (2 Kings 5:1-19). Not only were those served by the prophets non-Jews, and thus considered to be outside the scope of God’s concern, but also they were people of particularly low status (widow, leper).

Jesus’s neighbors were “filled with rage” when they heard what Jesus said (Luke 4:28). Why were they so angry? In part, they were upset because Jesus declined to do for them what he had done for others. They expected better of their hometown hero. But what seemed to enrage them most of all was the implication of Jesus’s Old Testament examples. Rather than performing miracles for those on the theological and cultural inside, Jesus would be reaching out to the margins. He would serve the kind of people that the good citizens of Nazareth despised and tried to avoid.

We who seek to follow Jesus today are challenged to follow his example. It is natural for us to serve those who are like us. We’re inclined to care for the people who live near us, look like us, vote like us, talk like us, and live like us. We prefer to hang out with these folks, to share our lives with them, and to go to church with them. It can be uncomfortable to reach out to people who aren’t like us, especially when their differentness puts them on the margins of our communities. We struggle to serve someone whose differentness we particularly disparage. Yet Jesus calls us to press through our discomfort, to see those we would easily overlook, to open our hearts to all who need the love and justice of God.

Reflect

Can you understand the feelings of the folks from Nazareth? In what ways might you be like them?

Who are the people you find particularly difficult to love? Are you open to God changing your heart toward these people?

Act

Take some time to pray about how you might reach out with God’s love to people on the margins of your particular community. Follow the lead of the Holy Spirit in tangible ways.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for coming to save us. Thank you for your love for all people. Thank you for challenging us to love beyond our comfort zones. Help us, we pray, to share your grace with those on the margins, even those whom we dislike or disparage. Give us your heart of love for all people. Amen.


Part 20: Honoring the Authority of Jesus

Scripture – Luke 4:31-32 (NRSV)

He went down to Capernaum, a city in Galilee, and was teaching them on the sabbath. They were astounded at his teaching, because he spoke with authority.

For more context, read Luke 4:31-37.

Focus

Jesus taught with surprising authority. Those who heard him marveled at the clarity and power of his words. We who seek to follow Jesus today are called, not just to marvel, but to believe and obey. Even when Jesus says something that makes us uncomfortable – like “Love your enemies” – our challenge is to act in faithful obedience. In this way our lives are built on solid ground.

Devotion

In some ways, Jesus resembled the Jewish teachers of his day, those called by the honorific title of rabbi. For example, like the rabbis, Jesus often taught in local synagogues, Jewish gathering places for teaching and prayer. (The photo shows a side of the ruins of a Jewish synagogue in Capernaum. Though this particular synagogue was built after the time of Jesus, beneath its floor you can see dark stones that were the foundation for the earlier synagogue in which Jesus taught.)

The synagogue in Capernaum.

The synagogue in Capernaum. Photo courtesy of Mark D. Roberts. All rights reserved.

In other ways Jesus stood apart from his Jewish counterparts. For example, ordinary rabbis expended great effort in passing on the traditions of earlier teachers. They believed that God had revealed two kinds of law to Moses on Mount Sinai, the written Law, inscribed in the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, and the oral law, which had not been written down. This oral law, apart from which one could not correctly interpret the written Law, had supposedly been passed down from Moses to Joshua to the elders and prophets and on down to the first-century rabbis. A Jewish teacher’s top priority was to preserve and to pass along the oral tradition, being sure to cite past authorities in the process.

But Jesus didn’t do this, and that astounded his listeners. He spoke directly and confidently, as if he possessed in himself the very authority of Moses. Moreover, when confronted by demons that had taken control of people, Jesus expelled them with commands like “Be silent, and come out of him!” (Luke 4:35). Thus, the people who heard Jesus were amazed. They told their friends about this unique rabbi so that “a report about him began to reach every place in the region” (Luke 4:37).

Of course, you and I don’t get to hear Jesus teach in person. I rather hope this will actually happen in the age to come. But, in the meanwhile, we do have access to the teachings of Jesus that are recorded in the biblical gospels. We can listen as he instructs all who would follow him, including us.

Then we have a decision to make. Will we acknowledge the authority of Jesus over our lives by believing and obeying? Or will we find a way to evade his authority? Ironically and sadly, we who seek to follow Jesus are sometimes quite adept at explaining away his teaching. We hear Jesus say things like “Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you” (Luke 6:27), and rather than taking this teaching to heart, no matter how uncomfortable we may be, we rationalize. We say things like, “Well, what Jesus really meant was . . .” and then we come up with something much easier to do than loving our actual enemies.

Now, I’m not suggesting that we shouldn’t work hard to understand what Jesus meant when he taught. This is an essential endeavor for those who wish to follow Jesus. But I am challenging us – and I am including myself here, for sure – to accept the unique, surprising, and disruptive authority of Jesus. When things he says are troubling to us, we mustn’t rush to dismiss them. Rather, through prayer, study, and wisdom from other Christ followers, we should work on how to grasp their true meaning and put them in to practice (Luke 6:47-48).

Reflect

Why do you think those of us who follow Jesus are sometimes quick to explain away his teachings?

Are there teachings of Jesus that you would rather avoid?

How has the authority of Jesus made a difference in your life?

Act

See if you can prayerfully identify some teaching of Jesus that you need to obey. As this becomes clear to you, ask the Lord to help you in our obedience.

Pray

Lord Jesus, as I read the account of your teaching in the synagogue in Capernaum, I am struck once again by your authority. Thank you for teaching in such a clear and powerful way. Thank you for exercising power even over demons through your words.

Lord, I confess that sometimes I try to evade your authority. Some of your teachings are hard for me, hard to understand, hard to obey. It is tempting to explain away what you have said so clearly. And sometimes I give in to that temptation.

So, I confess my failure to acknowledge your authority in a consistent way. And I ask for your help. Help me to understand your teaching and how it speaks to me today. Help me to obey, even when I am reticent or afraid. May I build my life on the solid rock of obedience to your teaching. Amen.


Part 21: Honoring the Authority of Jesus: An Example

Scripture – Luke 4:31-32 (NRSV)

He went down to Capernaum, a city in Galilee, and was teaching them on the sabbath. They were astounded at his teaching, because he spoke with authority.

For more context, read Luke 4:31-37.

Focus

Honoring the authority of Jesus can be difficult when he asks to do what we’d rather avoid. Loving our enemies, for example, is not something we’re naturally inclined to do. Many of us also struggle with other things Jesus said, like going directly to someone who has wronged us in order to reconcile. Truly, following Jesus is not always easy, but he will help us through the power of his Spirit.

Devotion

A man tightrope-walking over a chasmIn yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion, I talked about the astounding authority of Jesus, suggesting that we need to respond to this authority by obeying him even when his teaching makes us uncomfortable. After all, which of us would find it comfortable to love our enemies or do good to those who hate us? This is tough stuff.

But even less demanding instructions of Jesus can be hard for us to obey. Today, I’d like to share with you one way in which I have tried to do this in my own life. You may or may not relate to the example I’m sharing, but I hope my openness will encourage you to examine honestly how you respond to the teachings of Jesus.

There is a passage in the Gospel of Matthew that has pursued me throughout my life rather like Javert hunting Jean Valjean in Les Misérables. It appears in Matthew 18:15-20, beginning this way, “If another member of the church sins against you, go and point out the fault when the two of you are alone. If the member listens to you, you have regained that one” (18:15). Jesus has more to say in this chapter about confrontation and reconciliation, but it’s verse 15 that has repeatedly challenged me to take seriously the authority of Jesus even when I’d rather not.

Why do I find this verse so challenging? Because am naturally inclined to avoid confrontation. By upbringing and, it seems, my genetic code, I would do almost anything to avoid what Jesus requires in Matthew 18:15. If a sister or brother in Christ wrongs me somehow, my inclination is to do one of the following: 1) deny my feelings of hurt or anger and try to forget what happened; 2) gossip to my friends about how bad this person is; 3) find a way to get even that I can somehow justify; or 4) hold onto my hurt as a way of protecting me from the person who wronged me. I’m not proud about these inclinations, mind you. I’m just being honest.

If I’m to do what Jesus requires and go directly to the person who wronged me, three things are true. First, I have to own my feelings of hurt and/or anger, rather than pretending they aren’t real. Second, I have to face the discomfort of personal confrontation. Third, I run the risk of having to forgive rather than allowing my hurt to create a barrier between me and the other person. None of these are things I would naturally choose.

I can still remember the first time, in an effort to honor the authority of Jesus in my life, I did what Matthew 18:15 teaches, going directly to someone who had wronged me. I was about 24 years old and it was downright scary for me. The conversation went well, actually; the other person admitted his wrong and asking for forgiveness, which I gladly gave. I left that encounter feeling grateful.

The memory of this experience has helped me over the years to do what Jesus says, even though I know confrontation doesn’t always lead to reconciliation. I’ll confess that I still resist at times, finding it hard to honor the authority of Jesus when I’d rather not do what he says. But I also know that he will help me if I ask. Obedience isn’t a matter of merely of will, but of God’s grace at work in our hearts through the Holy Spirit.

Reflect

How do you feel about Matthew 18:15? Do you ever struggle to do what Jesus says in this verse?

In what ways do you honor the authority of Jesus over your life?

Do you sense that Jesus is asking you to do something today that you’d rather not do?

Act

Ask the Lord whether there is something he wants you to do that you’re resisting. If the Spirit brings something to mind, ask for help in doing the right thing. Then, by God’s grace, step out to do it.

Pray

Lord Jesus, you know that sometimes we struggle to do what you ask of us. Following you is wonderful, but also difficult. It requires that we surrender ultimate authority over our lives to you. And sometimes this means we will choose to do things we’d rather not do.

Lord, is there something you’d like me to do that I’m ignoring or resisting? If so, please reveal this to me through your Word and Spirit. Then, I pray, help me to do whatever it is as I seek to honor your authority in my life. Thank you for the indwelling power of your Spirit, who helps me live in obedience to you. Amen.


Part 22: Purpose Over Popularity

Scripture – Luke 4:42-44 (NRSV)

At daybreak he departed and went into a deserted place. And the crowds were looking for him; and when they reached him, they wanted to prevent him from leaving them. But he said to them, “I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other cities also; for I was sent for this purpose.” So he continued proclaiming the message in the synagogues of Judea.

Focus

Early in his ministry, Jesus was extremely popular with the crowds. They marveled at his teachings and were astounded by his healings. They wanted Jesus to stay with them. Yet Jesus was not governed by the feelings of others. He chose purpose over popularity. His example challenges us to live our lives in fulfillment of our calling, not in order to get the most “likes” or win the most “friends.” When we are clear about our purpose, then we can devote our lives to what really matters.

Devotion

A crowd of people with their hands in the airHealing was a centerpiece of Jesus’s ministry. In a time when medical science was in its infancy, people flocked to Jesus in the hope that he would heal them and/or their loved ones. As he did this, his popularity grew exponentially. He was in demand as a preacher of the kingdom of God and especially as a divinely-empowered healer.

Yet Jesus did not let his fame distract him from his purpose. In Luke 4:42-44 we see Jesus leave the crowds for “a deserted place.” (In tomorrow’s devotion I’ll say more about what he was doing there.) Yet the crowds searched for Jesus. When they found him, they tried “to prevent him from leaving them” (Luke 4:42). It doesn’t take much imagination to understand how they felt. But Jesus declined their demand that he stick around. He said, “I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other cities also; for I was sent for this purpose” (Luke 4:43). So he pressed on, proclaiming the kingdom “in the synagogues of Judea” (Luke 4:44).

As I reflect on this passage, I’m struck by Jesus’s ability to choose purpose over popularity. He said “No” to that which can easily blow us off course. When people like us, when they want to be with us, our ego needs often overwhelm our better judgment. When thinking of the troubles young adults can get into, we sometimes talk about their “bowing to peer pressure.” But, the fact is that more mature adults often do the very same thing.

Jesus, however, was clear about his purpose, and this protected him from the lure of popularity. Though the people around him had an agenda for his life, Jesus had his own agenda, an agenda he had received from his Heavenly Father. He knew that his primary purpose at this stage of his ministry was to “proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other cities also” (Luke 4:43).

In future devotions I’ll talk about the kingdom of God and what helped Jesus to stay on task in light of his purpose. Today, I want to leave you with a few questions for reflection.

Reflect

Have you ever found yourself in a position like that of Jesus in Luke 4, with people eager for you to fulfill their agenda for your life? If so, what was this like? How did you respond?

What do you think enabled Jesus to be clear about his purpose?

Are you clear about your purpose in life?

How does your sense of your purpose guide the choices you make?

Act

With your small group or a wise friend, talk about your sense of purpose in life and how this guides you (or not). Listen to their experiences and see what you can learn from them.

Pray

Lord Jesus, today I am struck by your response to the people who want you to stay with them. You declined their invitation because you knew your purpose. That purpose – preaching the kingdom of God – guided your life and helped you not to be governed by popularity.

Lord, I confess that I can be swayed by people’s feelings about me. I want to be liked. I want to be wanted. These desires can make it hard for me to live fully for my purpose. Forgive me when I get off course because of my need for human affirmation.

Keep me from being drawn by the pressures of the crowd. Help me, I pray, to know my purposes and let this purpose guide my life. Amen.


Part 23: Prayer and Purpose

Scripture – Luke 4:42-44; 5:15-16 (NRSV)

At daybreak he departed and went into a deserted place. And the crowds were looking for him; and when they reached him, they wanted to prevent him from leaving them. But he said to them, “I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other cities also; for I was sent for this purpose.” So he continued proclaiming the message in the synagogues of Judea.

But now more than ever the word about Jesus spread abroad; many crowds would gather to hear him and to be cured of their diseases. But he would withdraw to deserted places and pray.

Focus

In the Gospel of Luke, Jesus chose purpose over popularity. His clarity about his life’s purpose and his ability to choose this over other tempting options were supported by his practice of prayer. Jesus often withdrew from the crowds in order to engage in conversation with his Heavenly Father. This clarified his sense of purpose and strengthened his resolve to do what he had been called to do. Similarly, you and I need time alone with God if we’re to know and to fulfill our purpose in life. Prayer elucidates and energizes purpose.

Devotion

A person in the middle of a field with her hands raised in prayerIn yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion, we noted the growing popularity of Jesus. Even when he escaped from the crowds to go to “a deserted place” (Luke 4:24), they pursued him, trying to get him to stay with them. But Jesus explained that he needed to preach the good news of the kingdom of God in other cities. “For I was sent for this purpose,” he said. Jesus chose purpose over popularity.

Why was he able to do this? What helped Jesus to be so clear about his purpose and to act decisively in light of it? We get a hint of an answer to this question in Luke 4:42, where it says that Jesus went to “a deserted place.” This hint is fleshed out in more detail in Luke 5:15-16. This passage highlights the popularity of Jesus once again, adding “But he would withdraw to deserted places and pray.” The Greek original emphasizes the repeated nature of Jesus’s actions. He often left the crowds for places in which he could be alone.

And what did Jesus do there? According to Luke 5:16, Jesus prayed. Unfortunately, Luke does not fill us in on the content of Jesus’s wilderness prayers. All we know is that he would regularly get away for a time of solitude, in which he would pray. But it seems likely that his practice of prayer enabled Jesus to gain clarity about his purpose. He did not let popularity govern his behavior because he knew what his Heavenly Father had called him to do.

Notice that Jesus exemplifies, not just occasional prayer, but a consistent practice of getting alone to pray. It’s not as if he goes out once and prays, “Father, show me my purpose.” Rather, Jesus’s clarity of purpose comes through his consistent conversation with God.

The example of Jesus encourages us to do likewise. If we want to know our life’s purpose, if we want to be able to decline that which would distract us from what we’re on this earth to do, then we need to establish a practice of regular prayer. We may not be able to withdraw to a deserted place very often, but we can find time, even in our busy days, to get alone for conversation with God. If this was essential for Jesus, surely it should be essential for us as well.

Reflect

Can you think of times in your life when, through prayer, you were able to clarify your purpose?

Do you have a regular discipline of getting alone with God for prayer? If so, what helps you to maintain this practice? If not, what makes it hard for you to do this?

Act

Set aside some time this week for a conversation with God about your purpose in life. If you can get away to “a deserted place” for this prayer, that’s great. But, even if not, find a time and place when you can be alone with your Heavenly Father.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for modeling for us the practice of prayer. Your example both encourages and challenges us.

Help me, Lord, to make time in my busy life for prayer. As I talk with you, help me to know more clearly my purpose in life. Give me the strength to live in light of that purpose, saying “no” even to good things that would distract me. May I devote all that I am each day to fulfilling your purpose for me.

To you be all the glory! Amen.


Part 24: Proclaiming the Kingdom of God

Scripture – Luke 4:42-44 (NRSV)

At daybreak he departed and went into a deserted place. And the crowds were looking for him; and when they reached him, they wanted to prevent him from leaving them. But he said to them, “I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other cities also; for I was sent for this purpose.” So he continued proclaiming the message in the synagogues of Judea.

Focus

Jesus said that his purpose was to proclaim the kingdom of God. The kingdom of God is not a place, an inner state of spiritual awareness, or life after death. Rather, the kingdom of God in the preaching of Jesus is God’s reign, God’s rule, God’s sovereignty. When we allow God to reign over every part of our lives, over every action and every word, we begin in this age to experience the reign of God. We celebrate the good news that “Our God reigns!”

Devotion

The face of a male lionn the past two days we have been reflecting on Luke 4:42-44. On Monday, we saw that Jesus chose purpose over popularity. Yesterday, we noted that part of what enabled Jesus to live intentionally in light of his purpose was his practice of regular prayer. Today, I’d like to consider with you the way Jesus described his purpose and how this matters to us.

Jesus turned down the invitation to remain in the region where he was popular because, as he said, “I must proclaim good news of the kingdom of God to other cities also; for I was sent for this purpose” (Luke 4:43). For the first time in Luke’s Gospel we encounter the phrase “kingdom of God.” It will show up another 31 times as a central theme in the preaching of Jesus.

What exactly is the kingdom of God? We’ll work on this question many times as we make our way through Luke. Today, I want to give a brief introduction to the kingdom of God in the preaching of Jesus.

First of all, it may be good to note what the kingdom of God is not. It’s not a particular place, like, for example, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia – though, I should add, the kingdom of God is experienced in time and space. It’s not some inner state or spiritual awareness. Moreover, the kingdom of God is not the same thing as Heaven, the place of life beyond this life. The kingdom of God is closely related to the life in the age to come. But when Jesus proclaimed the kingdom of God, he wasn’t just showing people how to get to Heaven after they died.

If the kingdom of God isn’t a place, or deep spiritual awareness, or Heaven, what is it? To put it simply, the kingdom of God is God’s reign. It’s God’s sovereignty, God’s rule, God’s authority. The Greek word translated as “kingdom” (basileia) in the phrase “kingdom of God” could refer to a physical kingdom, but it was also used for kingly authority. This was true of the Aramaic word malkut, which Jesus used in his preaching. We see this clearly in the prayer Jesus taught his disciples, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10). When God’s reign comes, God’s will is done on earth, just like in heaven.

Thus, what Jesus was sent to proclaim was the good news that God was coming to reign. Indeed, he preached that God’s reign had drawn near. Thus, the prophecy of Isaiah was being fulfilled in Jesus’s own ministry: “How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of the messenger who announces peace, who brings good news, who announces salvation, who says to Zion, ‘Your God reigns’” (Isaiah 52:7). Jesus was this messenger. Of course he was more than just the messenger. He was also central to the message. But we’ll get to this later.

For us, the reign of God is something we can experience each day. When we acknowledge God as the sovereign over our lives, when we allow God to reign over everything we do and say, we experience what Jesus proclaimed. Each time we choose God’s justice over injustice, each time we offer God’s love rather than hate, each time we acknowledge God’s sovereignty, we savor the reality promised by Isaiah and fulfilled through Jesus: Our God reigns!

Reflect

When you read the phrase “kingdom of God” in the New Testament, what do you envision?

In what ways have you experienced God’s reign in your life?

What helps you to live under the sovereignty of God each day?

Act

At the beginning of the day, acknowledge God as your king. Ask God to reign over your life, in all you do and say. Throughout the day, remember that God is your king as you seek to honor him.

Pray

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be your name.

Your kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.

Your kingdom come in my life today, in my work and rest, in my words and my deeds, in my thoughts and feelings, in all that I am and all that I do.

Your kingdom come in our world today. May your will be done in cities and companies, in schools and stores, in studios and shops, in fields and factories.

Your kingdom come, Lord. Establish and uphold your kingdom “with justice and with righteousness, from this time onward and forevermore.”* Amen.

*Quotation from Isaiah 9:7


Part 25: Responding to His Call

Scripture – Luke 5:8-11 (NRSV)

But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!” For he and all who were with him were amazed at the catch of fish that they had taken; and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people.” When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him.

For more context, you can read Luke 5:1-11 here.

Focus

In the biblical Gospels we see Jesus calling those who will be his disciples. They respond by following him, literally. Today, we also respond to the call of Jesus. We are disciples in response to his initiative. Jesus calls us into relationship with himself and into a life of service. Following Jesus changes the way we work and live each day.

Devotion

A family in a fishing boat bringing in the netsAs you know, this devotion is part of a series I’ve called Following Jesus Today. I’m working my way slowly through the Gospel of Luke, reflecting on passages that help us grasp what it means for us to follow Jesus in our world, in this time of history, in our workplaces and homes, in our cities and churches. Today’s passage from Luke speaks explicitly about the disciples following Jesus, giving us plenty to chew on as we consider how we also might follow Jesus.

Today’s story happens by the “lake of Gennesaret,” also known as the Sea of Galilee (Luke 5:1). Jesus taught the crowd that had gathered from a boat belonging to a fisherman named Simon. Presumably, the acoustics were better this way. After he finished speaking, Jesus told Simon to go out into deeper water and lower his nets. Simon wanted to demur because he and his crew had been fishing all night without any luck. But, at the word of Jesus, they dropped their nets. Instantly they caught so many fish that their nets began to break. Seeing this, Simon Peter fell down before Jesus, saying, “Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!” (Luke 5:8). But Jesus responded, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people” (Luke 5:10). So when the boats landed, Simon Peter and his partners, James and John, “left everything and followed [Jesus]” (Luke 5:11).

One of the striking things about this story is the initiative Jesus shows in calling Simon Peter, James, and John. In the first-century Jewish world, a person who wanted to learn from a certain rabbi would seek out the rabbi. But Jesus does things the other way around by actively reaching out to those he wanted to follow him.

Jesus called his disciples in the first century. And he still calls disciples today. Though we don’t usually receive a visit from the human Jesus who jumps in our boat and calls us with an audible voice, we who follow him do so in response to his call. We hear this call in different ways, sometimes through preaching, sometimes through reading the Gospels, sometimes through the witness of a family member or colleague. No matter how it begins, following Jesus isn’t something we initiate. It is our response to the initiative of Jesus in our lives. It is acting in obedience to the one who says to us, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people” (Luke 5:10).

Reflect

If you are following Jesus, how did you first hear his call?

How does the call to follow Jesus make a difference in your daily life? In your work? In your relationships? In your civic involvement?

Act

Read through Luke 5:1-11, putting yourself in the place of Simon Peter. Imagine how you would think and feel if you were in his shoes. Is there anything you’d like to say to Jesus in light of your reflections?

Pray

Lord Jesus, though you haven’t visited me in the way you once dropped in on Simon Peter, James, and John, I thank you for taking initiative in my life. Thank you for calling me into relationship with you and participating in your work in the world. Though I can’t literally walk with you today, help me to follow you in all that I do and say. May I live in response to your gracious call today, and every day. Amen.


Part 26: You Don’t Have to Be Perfect to Follow Jesus

Scripture – Luke 5:4-8 (NRSV)

When [Jesus] had finished speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into the deep water and let down your nets for a catch.” Simon answered, “Master, we have worked all night long but have caught nothing. Yet if you say so, I will let down the nets.” When they had done this, they caught so many fish that their nets were beginning to break. So they signaled their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!”

For more context, you can read Luke 5:1-11 here.

Focus

In Luke 5, when Simon Peter observes Jesus doing an extraordinary miracle, he tells Jesus to go away because, as he says, “I am a sinful man.” But Jesus does not go away. Instead, he calls Simon to follow him and join his kingdom-centered mission. This is good news for us! It means we don’t have to try to be perfect in order to follow Jesus. Jesus calls sinners to follow him, people like Simon Peter, people like you and me.

Devotion

Three neon signs that say "Perfect"Today we continue our examination of Luke 5:1-11, the account of Jesus’s calling of his first disciples. In last Thursday’s Life for Leaders devotion, we saw that following Jesus begins with his initiative and call. That was true when Jesus was on earth physically and it remains true today.

Luke 5 begins with Jesus using one of the boats belonging to Simon Peter as a platform from which to address the crowds. After he finished speaking, Jesus told Simon to go out into deeper water and let down his nets. Though Simon and his crew had labored all night without success, they did as Jesus asked a gesture of respect. All of a sudden, their nets were filled to the point of breaking. Seeing this miraculous catch, Simon Peter “fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, ‘Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!’” (Luke 5:8). But Jesus did not do as Simon said. He did not go away. In fact, Jesus did just the opposite of what Simon expected, actually calling Simon and his partners to join Jesus’s kingdom-proclaiming mission. So, when they brought their boats to shore, Simon, James, and John “left everything and followed Jesus” (Luke 5:11).

So much in this story speaks to us, even though we do not have the honor of encountering Jesus in the flesh or following after him literally. Today, I’m struck by Simon Peter’s response to Jesus’s miracle and Jesus’s response to Simon’s response. Seeing how many fish had been caught in a place that had no fish only hours earlier, Simon knew he had witnessed a miracle. No doubt he sensed in Jesus God’s own holy presence and power. But Simon knew his own moral defects and felt sure that he did not belong with a holy man like Jesus. So-called holy men in  first-century Judaism stayed away from people they regarded as sinful.

But Jesus was not your ordinary holy man. He did not withdraw from sinful people. He sought them out. He hung out with them. He brought the good news of God’s kingdom to them (see Luke 5:32). Indeed, he called them to follow him and join his mission. This was good news for Simon. And it is good news for us. It means that we don’t have to clean up our lives in order to say “yes” to Jesus. We don’t have to make ourselves perfect before he calls us, as if this were even possible.

Throughout my pastoral experience, I have talked with people who think they’re not good enough for God. Perhaps you have been or still are one of these people. Like Simon, you know your sin. And, like Simon, you believe you are not worthy to follow Jesus. But Jesus, who knows everything about you, the good, the bad, and the ugly, is not deterred. He calls you to follow him, not because you’re perfect, but because he loves you and seeks your partnership in his mission. In responding to his call, you will find the desire and the power to renounce sin. But this comes in response to the gracious call of Jesus, not as a prerequisite for receiving that call.

Reflect

Can you understand Simon Peter’s reaction to Jesus? Have you ever felt that way? If so, when? What happened?

Have you ever felt like you’re not worthy to follow Jesus because of your moral failures?

What might it mean for you if you were to follow Jesus today? (Not just “today” as in “these days” but “today” as “this very day.”)

Act

Take some time to reflect on how you have “heard” the call of Jesus. When has his call been especially clear and compelling? What difference has the call of Jesus made in your life?

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for not leaving when Simon attempted to send you away. Thank you for calling him to follow you in spite of his being “a sinful man.”

Thank you, Lord, for calling me to follow you even though I too am a sinner. Thank you for inviting me to share in your kingdom work in spite of the ways I am not worthy of such an honor.

As I follow you, help me by your grace to turn away from sin. May I experience your freeing, transforming forgiveness. May my life be shaped more and more by your kingdom, power, and glory. Amen.


Part 27: Must I Leave Everything Behind?

Scripture – Luke 5:9-11 (NRSV)

For he and all who were with him were amazed at the catch of fish that they had taken; and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. Then Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; from now on you will be catching people.” When they had brought their boats to shore, they left everything and followed him.

For more context, you can read Luke 5:1-11 here.

Focus

Sometimes Jesus calls people to follow him by leaving their current lives behind and starting over again in a brand new location. This happened to the first disciples of Jesus, for example. For most of us, however, following Jesus is something we do in our familiar cities, families, and workplaces. To be sure, following Jesus still requires plenty of leaving behind. Jesus will ask us to discard our worldly values, unjust practices, prejudicial biases, selfish materialism, and inborn “me first” attitude. We will come to see our whole life, including our daily work and everyday relationships, as contexts in which can follow Jesus faithfully.

Devotion

An old car in a shed being worked onWhen I was in elementary school, a missionary couple serving in a small Latin American country returned to the United States on furlough. The Beckers shared their experiences in my Sunday School class, impressing upon us how simple their life was in their adopted country. When it was time for Q&A, one of my friends asked in a serious tone, “Do you have McDonalds where you live?” The Beckers answered with similar seriousness, “No, we don’t. That’s something we had to give up.” We were all impressed. For us, leaving McDonald’s behind would be a major sacrifice. We thought missionaries sure had a hard life.

The notion of giving up everything to follow Jesus didn’t begin with twentieth-century missionaries, however. In fact, that idea appears in our passage from Luke 5. When Jesus called Simon, promising that he would now be “catching people,” Simon and his partners “left everything and followed him” (Luke 5:11). Indeed, they left their jobs, their homes, their families, and most of their possessions behind so that they might actually follow Jesus as he traveled throughout Galilee and Judea, preaching the good news of the kingdom of God.

Are we supposed to do the same if we are going to follow Jesus?

For some people the answer to this question is “yes” (or “mostly, yes,” at any rate). The Beckers gave up just about everything in order to serve the Lord overseas. Like Simon, James, and John, they literally left almost everything and literally went away from their home in faithfulness to their particular calling.

Let me repeat that last phrase, “in faithfulness to their particular calling.” The reason that the Beckers had to leave so much behind was that they knew the Lord wanted them to go far away. They could not bring with them their home, friends, jobs, and local McDonald’s restaurant. They were able to bring their children, but not their extended family. Their act of leaving behind was required by their specific response to the specific call of Jesus.

Most of us won’t be called to this particular kind of work, however. For us, following Jesus is something we do in our familiar cities, families, and workplaces. Yes, we will follow Jesus even if we work at McDonald’s. To be sure, following Jesus still requires plenty of leaving behind. Jesus will ask us to discard our worldly values, unjust practices, prejudicial biases, selfish materialism, and inborn “me first” attitude. We will come to see our whole life, including our daily work and everyday relationships, as contexts in which can follow Jesus faithfully.

Reflect

Why do you think Simon, James, and John left everything to follow Jesus?

Have you ever left something behind (literally or figuratively) in response to the call of Jesus? If so, what was it? Why did you leave it behind?

Might there be things in your life now that Jesus is asking you to discard? If so, what are these things and what do you propose to do with them?

Act

If you sense that Jesus wants you to leave something behind in order to follow him more faithfully, ask for the strength to do it. Then, share what you have decided with a Christian brother or sister, someone who can support you, pray for you, and hold you accountable.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I wonder what I would have done if I had been in the boat with Simon Peter. Would I have responded to your call as Simon, James, and John did? Would I have been willing to leave so much behind in order to follow you? I hope so, by your grace.

Lord, today I don’t sense that you are calling me to a new location or a new job. But I am quite sure that you want me to follow you right where I am, with my family and friends, in my work and neighborhood, in my church and my city. Help me, Lord, to say “yes” to your call. Show me what I need to offload if I’m going to follow you faithfully. May I turn from all that keeps me from following you in every context of my life.

Thank you for calling me into relationship with you and into your service. May I live today for the praise of your glory! Amen.

Part 28: Healing Beyond Healing

Scripture – Luke 5:12-14 (NRSV)

Once, when he was in one of the cities, there was a man covered with leprosy. When he saw Jesus, he bowed with his face to the ground and begged him, “Lord, if you choose, you can make me clean.” Then Jesus stretched out his hand, touched him, and said, “I do choose. Be made clean.” Immediately the leprosy left him. And he ordered him to tell no one. “Go,” he said, “and show yourself to the priest, and, as Moses commanded, make an offering for your cleansing, for a testimony to them.”

Focus

Healing was central to the ministry of Jesus. When he healed people, he demonstrated the reality of the kingdom of God. God’s power defeats disease. God’s love creates wholeness. So when God reigns, healing happens. Jesus offered physical healing, yes, but also healing beyond healing . . . relational healing, psychological healing, spiritual healing. Jesus seeks to make us whole in every way.

Devotion

Healing was central to the ministry of Jesus. When he healed people, he demonstrated the reality of the kingdom of God. God’s power is greater than disease and even death. So when God reigns, healing happens. Broken bodies are restored.

Yet Jesus sought to heal people, not just physically, but in other ways as well. We see this in Luke 5:12-14. When a man with leprosy approached Jesus and asked if he might choose to make him clean, Jesus said, “I do choose. Be made clean” (Luke 5:13). At that moment, the leprosy left the man. He was healed. That’s wonderful, but it’s not the whole story.

There are two crucial details in this story that show Jesus’s full intentions. In order to make sense of them, we need to understand how leprosy affected the life of one afflicted with this disease, in addition to the physical illness itself. People with severe skin diseases were excluded from Jewish society in an ancient version of social distancing. They had to live alone, away from their families and outside of their cities. Moreover, people with leprosy were regarded as ceremonially unclean, which meant they were excluded from religious practices. Healthy people were forbidden by law from touching someone with leprosy. If one who was healthy happened to brush up against someone with a skin disease, the healthy person became ceremonially unclean and would therefore, be excluded from certain communal gatherings until his or her cleanliness was restored.

With this background in mind, we note with keen interest that before Jesus pronounced the man with leprosy clean, he “stretched out his hand” and “touched him” (Luke 5:13). Jesus chose to become ceremonially unclean. Luke does not tell us why, though it’s likely that Jesus wanted to communicate love and acceptance through touch. The man before him had been cut off from human touch for a long time. Jesus literally reached out to him as a way to reach into his hurting soul. Jesus sought to heal the man, not only of his disease, but also of his desolation.

We see this happening in Jesus’s instructions to the man after his healing. He told him to go to the local priest and make an offering. Why? “For a testimony to them,” Jesus said (Luke 5:14). “Them,” in this case, would be the people of the community to which the man with leprosy belonged. According to the Mosaic law, the priest had the authority to declare someone clean, which meant that person could be restored into fellowship with others. He no longer had to live apart from his community. He no longer had to be denied the love of family and friends. He no longer was excluded from working so as to support himself and affirm his dignity

By touching the man with leprosy and sending him to the priest, Jesus healed the man in more ways than one. Yes, he was healed miraculously of his disease. But, through touch and priestly affirmation, the man with leprosy was healed of his loneliness, isolation, and inability to contribute the common good. Jesus offers physical healing, yes, but also healing beyond healing . . . relational healing, psychological healing, spiritual healing. Jesus seeks to make us whole in every way.

Reflect

How do you respond to the story in Luke 5:12-14?

In what ways, if at all, can you relate to the yearning of the man with leprosy for wholeness?

If you were to come before Jesus today, what would you ask of him? In what ways do you need to be healed?

Act

Find some moments of quiet so you might reflect deeply on Luke 5:12-14. Imagine what it would be like to be the man who is healed of leprosy. Imagine what Jesus looked like and sounded like as he interacted with this man. See if God has more for you through this story.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for your healing power. Thank you for your mercy and compassion. Thank you for your love.

Thank you, Lord, for wanting us to be whole, not just in body, but in all ways. Thank you for all the ways you have healed us and are healing us still.

Lord, I ask you to continue your healing work in me. You know where I am broken and need fixing. You know my relationships that need mending. So, like the man in today’s story, I ask you to make me clean. Amen.


Part 28: Healing Beyond Healing

Scripture – Luke 5:18-19 (NRSV)

Just then some men came, carrying a paralyzed man on a bed. They were trying to bring him in and lay him before Jesus; but finding no way to bring him in because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and let him down with his bed through the tiles into the middle of the crowd in front of Jesus.

For the context for this passage, read Luke 5:17-27.

Focus

Following Jesus isn’t safe. If we’re going to follow Jesus today, we will inevitably take risks. We may put at risk our comfort, reputation, safety, or financial security. Yet, the more we trust Jesus and pay attention to him, the more we will be empowered to take risks for the sake of his kingdom and for the people he has entrusted to our care.

Devotion

If, like me, you grew up going to Sunday School, then you are surely familiar with the story on which we are focusing today. But if you’re familiar with this story, you may miss one of the things it teaches us about following Jesus. I’m hoping that today’s Life for Leaders devotion may help you to see things in a new light.

The basic story goes like this: Jesus was teaching and healing in some sort of building, probably a home. Quite a crowd had gathered, including many Jewish teachers. Some men brought a paralyzed man on a bed so that Jesus might heal him, but the crowd kept them away. So, the men went up on the roof, removed a good portion of the roof, and lowered the paralyzed man down before Jesus. Seeing the faith of the men on the roof, Jesus forgave the sins of the paralyzed man. This enraged the Jewish teachers who believed that only God could forgive sins. Jesus explained that he, as the Son of Man, had authority to forgive sins. He proved the point by telling the paralyzed man to get up and go home, which he promptly did. The crowd marveled, glorifying God and saying, “We have seen strange things today” (Luke 5:26).

When I have preached on this passage, I have focused on the faith of the men who lowered their friend before Jesus. I have also talked about the significance of Jesus’s claim to have authority to forgive sins. Today, however, I want to reflect with you on the risk taken by the men who carried the bed. It was a big one!

Don’t you wish you could have heard their conversation? When they realized that there was no way they could gain access to Jesus, I imagine one of them saying, “Oh, this won’t work. Maybe we should wait until later.” Another might have said, “Hey, why don’t we ask people to make room for us.” Still another added, “That won’t work. But we could get on the roof, make a big hole, and let the bed down right in front of Jesus.” The first speaker might have responded, “Are you crazy? We can’t get up on the roof with this bed. And there’s no way we can make a hole in somebody’s roof. We’d get in serious trouble.” But, as they talked, they were reminded of just how much they wanted their friend to be healed. They believed this really was their only chance. So they decided to climb onto the roof and break it, making a hole large enough for the bed.

Unfortunately, Luke doesn’t tell us what happened while these men were creating the hole in the roof. It’s not hard to imagine, however, what they might have been hearing from the crowd: “What are you guys doing? Are you crazy? You can’t break Levi’s house! That’s illegal . . . and stupid. You’re interrupting the teacher. You’re cutting in line. You guys are going to be in such trouble.” Still, the men opened up the roof and lowered their friend right in front of Jesus.

What did these men risk? Many things. They risked their reputation. If their scheme didn’t work, they’d become the laughingstock of their town. They risked serious legal trouble by damaging someone’s home. Would they be arrested? Would they be sued? They risked Jesus’s ire, since they interrupted his teaching in a major way. They risked the ire of the people who had gathered to be healed but we’re stuck in the back of the crowd. And, of course, they risked the possibility that, after all that they had done, their friend would not be healed.

In Monday’s devotion I want to consider what in the world motivated these bed-carrying men to take such risks. Today, I want to suggest that if you and I are going to follow Jesus, we will need to take major risks as well. No, I’m not envisioning you making a hole in somebody’s roof. But I am thinking about other risks you might take as you follow Jesus. You may run the risk of having people at work think you’re a religious nut. You may put yourself in places where you feel uncomfortable or unsafe. You may have a smaller nest egg for your future because of your generosity. You may put your professional reputation on the line because you believe God wants you to lead a startup. You may risk the unhappiness of your coworkers when you ask them not to make jokes that disrespect or objectify others. Or . . . you name it.

In light of the risk-taking of the people in our story, please consider the following questions.

Reflect

If you had been one of the bed-carrying men, how might you have dealt with the problem of “no access” to Jesus?

In general, are you someone who takes risks? Or do you tend to choose that which is safe, predictable, and secure? Why are you this way?

Have you ever taken a risk because you are a follower of Jesus? When? What was it? How did it turn out? Or, how is it turning out now?

Act

With your small group or a wise friend, talk about risk taking and faith. As you talk, try to discern whether Jesus is calling you to take a risk today?

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for the boldness of the bed-carrying men. Thank you for their willingness to take a risk for the sake of their friend. Thank you for responding to their daring by acknowledging their faith and healing the paralyzed man.

Lord, as you know, I’m not particularly fond of risk taking, to say the least. I prefer what is predictable, safe, and secure. But I do want to follow you faithfully. So, I pray that when it is time for me to take a risk for your sake, you will give me the boldness I need. Amen.


Part 29: Taking Risks

Scripture – Luke 5:18-19 (NRSV)

Just then some men came, carrying a paralyzed man on a bed. They were trying to bring him in and lay him before Jesus; but finding no way to bring him in because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and let him down with his bed through the tiles into the middle of the crowd in front of Jesus.

For the context for this passage, read Luke 5:17-27.

Focus

Following Jesus isn’t safe. If we’re going to follow Jesus today, we will inevitably take risks. We may put at risk our comfort, reputation, safety, or financial security. Yet, the more we trust Jesus and pay attention to him, the more we will be empowered to take risks for the sake of his kingdom and for the people he has entrusted to our care.

Devotion

If, like me, you grew up going to Sunday School, then you are surely familiar with the story on which we are focusing today. But if you’re familiar with this story, you may miss one of the things it teaches us about following Jesus. I’m hoping that today’s Life for Leaders devotion may help you to see things in a new light.

The basic story goes like this: Jesus was teaching and healing in some sort of building, probably a home. Quite a crowd had gathered, including many Jewish teachers. Some men brought a paralyzed man on a bed so that Jesus might heal him, but the crowd kept them away. So, the men went up on the roof, removed a good portion of the roof, and lowered the paralyzed man down before Jesus. Seeing the faith of the men on the roof, Jesus forgave the sins of the paralyzed man. This enraged the Jewish teachers who believed that only God could forgive sins. Jesus explained that he, as the Son of Man, had authority to forgive sins. He proved the point by telling the paralyzed man to get up and go home, which he promptly did. The crowd marveled, glorifying God and saying, “We have seen strange things today” (Luke 5:26).

When I have preached on this passage, I have focused on the faith of the men who lowered their friend before Jesus. I have also talked about the significance of Jesus’s claim to have authority to forgive sins. Today, however, I want to reflect with you on the risk taken by the men who carried the bed. It was a big one!

Don’t you wish you could have heard their conversation? When they realized that there was no way they could gain access to Jesus, I imagine one of them saying, “Oh, this won’t work. Maybe we should wait until later.” Another might have said, “Hey, why don’t we ask people to make room for us.” Still another added, “That won’t work. But we could get on the roof, make a big hole, and let the bed down right in front of Jesus.” The first speaker might have responded, “Are you crazy? We can’t get up on the roof with this bed. And there’s no way we can make a hole in somebody’s roof. We’d get in serious trouble.” But, as they talked, they were reminded of just how much they wanted their friend to be healed. They believed this really was their only chance. So they decided to climb onto the roof and break it, making a hole large enough for the bed.

Unfortunately, Luke doesn’t tell us what happened while these men were creating the hole in the roof. It’s not hard to imagine, however, what they might have been hearing from the crowd: “What are you guys doing? Are you crazy? You can’t break Levi’s house! That’s illegal . . . and stupid. You’re interrupting the teacher. You’re cutting in line. You guys are going to be in such trouble.” Still, the men opened up the roof and lowered their friend right in front of Jesus.

What did these men risk? Many things. They risked their reputation. If their scheme didn’t work, they’d become the laughingstock of their town. They risked serious legal trouble by damaging someone’s home. Would they be arrested? Would they be sued? They risked Jesus’s ire, since they interrupted his teaching in a major way. They risked the ire of the people who had gathered to be healed but we’re stuck in the back of the crowd. And, of course, they risked the possibility that, after all that they had done, their friend would not be healed.

In Monday’s devotion I want to consider what in the world motivated these bed-carrying men to take such risks. Today, I want to suggest that if you and I are going to follow Jesus, we will need to take major risks as well. No, I’m not envisioning you making a hole in somebody’s roof. But I am thinking about other risks you might take as you follow Jesus. You may run the risk of having people at work think you’re a religious nut. You may put yourself in places where you feel uncomfortable or unsafe. You may have a smaller nest egg for your future because of your generosity. You may put your professional reputation on the line because you believe God wants you to lead a startup. You may risk the unhappiness of your coworkers when you ask them not to make jokes that disrespect or objectify others. Or . . . you name it.

In light of the risk-taking of the people in our story, please consider the following questions.

Reflect

If you had been one of the bed-carrying men, how might you have dealt with the problem of “no access” to Jesus?

In general, are you someone who takes risks? Or do you tend to choose that which is safe, predictable, and secure? Why are you this way?

Have you ever taken a risk because you are a follower of Jesus? When? What was it? How did it turn out? Or, how is it turning out now?

Act

With your small group or a wise friend, talk about risk taking and faith. As you talk, try to discern whether Jesus is calling you to take a risk today?

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for the boldness of the bed-carrying men. Thank you for their willingness to take a risk for the sake of their friend. Thank you for responding to their daring by acknowledging their faith and healing the paralyzed man.

Lord, as you know, I’m not particularly fond of risk taking, to say the least. I prefer what is predictable, safe, and secure. But I do want to follow you faithfully. So, I pray that when it is time for me to take a risk for your sake, you will give me the boldness I need. Amen.


Part 30: Why Take Risks?

Scripture – Luke 5:18-19 (NRSV)

Just then some men came, carrying a paralyzed man on a bed. They were trying to bring him in and lay him before Jesus; but finding no way to bring him in because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and let him down with his bed through the tiles into the middle of the crowd in front of Jesus.

For the context for this passage, read Luke 5:17-27.

Focus

The more we trust Jesus, the more we will take risks for the sake of the kingdom of God. We will be emboldened to try things we would not otherwise try, to love in ways we would not otherwise love. Why? Because we trust Jesus to guide us, empower us, and work through us. So, whether we are moving far away from home in response to God’s call, reaching out to care for a colleague at work, or confronting injustice in our city, we rely on Jesus, the one we trust because he is utterly trustworthy.

Devotion

In last Thursday’s Life for Leaders devotion, I began to examine the story in Luke 5:17-27 in which several men brought to Jesus a paralyzed man lying on a bed. When they couldn’t get close enough to Jesus for him to heal their friend, the men did a shocking thing: getting up on the roof of the building where Jesus was speaking, making a large hole in the roof, and letting down the bed with their friend so that it landed right in front of Jesus. Jesus did indeed heal the paralyzed man, but only after forgiving his sins, which stirred up the Jewish teachers who were observing Jesus’s behavior.

In Thursday’s devotion we focused on the fact that the men who carried their friend to Jesus took many risks along the way. They risked reputation and legal repercussions. They risked angering many people, including Jesus. And they risked the disappointment that Jesus would not, after all they had done, heal their friend.

Why, I wonder, did the bed-carrying men take on such risks? Luke supplies one answer to this question, which we’ll examine in a moment. But first I want to note something that is likely though not stated explicitly. We can surely infer from the story that the bed-carrying men were deeply committed to their paralyzed friend and his healing. They were willing to risk so much because of their care for him. Committed love for others will motivate us to put everything on the line. The more we love, the more we will take risks in service to others.

Though Luke does not actually mention the care of the bed-carriers for the paralyzed man, he does note another reason for their risk-taking behavior. After they tore a hole in the roof and lowered their friend down to Jesus, Luke notes that Jesus “saw their faith” and then ministered to the paralyzed man (5:20). Surely, the men who brought their friend to Jesus had exceptional faith. They were convinced that Jesus had the power to heal and would indeed heal their friend if they could only get him into Jesus’s presence. They trusted Jesus utterly.

The more we trust Jesus, the more we will take risks for the sake of the kingdom of God. We will be emboldened to try things we would not otherwise try, to love in ways we would not otherwise love, to build what we would not otherwise build. Why? Because we trust Jesus to guide us, empower us, and work through us. So, whether we are moving far away from home in response to God’s call, reaching out to care for a colleague at work, confronting injustice in our city, we rely on Jesus, the one we trust because he is utterly trustworthy.

Reflect

Can you think of a time in your life when you took a risk because you cared for someone? What was this like for you?

Can you think of a time in your life when you took a risk because of your trust in Jesus? What was this like for you?

What helps you to grow in your trust in Jesus?

Act

With your small group or a wise friend, take some time to reflect together on this question: If I really trusted Jesus, what would I do that I am not doing now?

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for the example of the bed-carrying men in this story from Luke. Thank you for their care for their friend. Thank you for their trust in you. Thank you for their willingness to take a risk – several risks, actually – for the sake of their friend’s healing. Thank you for seeing their faith and for healing the paralyzed man.

I ask, Lord, that you help me to care for others more than I do today. Give me love, not only for those I already love, but for those I have a hard time loving. May my love motivate my action.

I also ask, Lord Jesus, that you help me to trust you more. I do trust you in many ways. You know that. But I also hold back. I find it hard to take major risks in response to your guidance. Safety is so comfortable. So, I ask that, by your Spirit, you strengthen my trust in you so that I might live for you more boldly. To you be all of the glory. Amen.


Part 31: Must I Leave Everything Behind? Further Thoughts

Scripture – Luke 5:27-28 (NRSV)

After this [Jesus] went out and saw a tax collector named Levi, sitting at the tax booth; and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he got up, left everything, and followed him.

Then Levi gave a great banquet for him in his house; and there was a large crowd of tax collectors and others sitting at the table with them.

For context, you can read Luke 5:27-32 here.

Focus

In the New Testament gospels, when Jesus called people they often “left everything” to follow him. While there’s no doubt that following Jesus involved significant sacrifice, financial and otherwise, not every disciple of Jesus gave up literally everything. In Luke 5, for example, Levi “left everything” to follow Jesus but was still able to host a banquet in his home. Though Levi was the legal owner, he thought of his home in a completely new perspective. It was now devoted to the ministry of Jesus. It was a base for hospitality and generosity. For us, therefore, whether we own, rent, or live with others, “our stuff” is not really ours. Everything we have belongs ultimately to the Lord and is devoted to his purposes.

Devotion

Last week we examined Luke 5:9-11, where Jesus called Simon Peter, James, and John to be his disciples. Luke reports that “they left everything and followed him” (5:11). I wondered if we also need to leave everything when we say “yes” to Jesus. We might, I suggested—depending on our specific calling. But most of us won’t literally leave everything behind. Rather, we’ll follow Jesus in our familiar cities, families, and workplaces. Yet, we will renounce a kind of ownership of our lives and our stuff as we offer all that we have and all that we are to Jesus and his mission.

We see an example of this kind of “leaving behind” in story of the call of Levi. When Jesus summoned Levi the tax collector to follow him, Levi “got up, left everything, and followed him” (Luke 5:28). If this was the end of Luke’s story of Levi, we might picture Levi leaving town in Jesus’s wake, perhaps not even saying goodbye to his family, and taking with him only the clothes on his back. Everything else he had left behind.

But Levi’s story continues in Luke 5. In verse 29 we read: “Then Levi gave a great banquet for him in his house; and there was a large crowd of tax collectors and others sitting at the table with him.” From this sentence we learn that Levi had considerable financial means because he was able to host a “great banquet” for “a large crowd.” His home must have been large and he obviously had money to sponsor a lavish feast for many people.

Levi’s wealth is not particularly surprising, given his former job as a tax collector. What is surprising is the fact that Levi, who had “left everything” to follow Jesus, still had a large home and a large amount of money. Does this fact contradict Luke’s claim that Levi “left everything”? Given Luke’s expertise as a historian (see Luke 1:1-4), it’s highly unlikely that he would have contradicted himself in two juxtaposed verses. No, what seems clear is that Luke didn’t understand “left everything” in a simplistic way. Leaving everything to follow Jesus meant, in some cases, that people left their homes and relationships. In Levi’s case, leaving everything meant leaving his job. But, beyond this, it was a matter of abandoning his former way of living for a new way of living. Though he still owned his home and had ample financial resources, Levi now used these freely and generously for the ministry of the kingdom.

Notice also that Levi didn’t leave behind the relationships he had before encountering Jesus. His banquet was for people he had known before, especially his business partners, or, as Luke calls them, “a large crowd of tax collectors and others” (5:29). What Levi left behind was seeing people instrumentally, as tools in his wealth-creation machine. As his life turned around, he wanted everyone in his sphere of influence to know Jesus and his kingdom message.

I realize that what I’ve just done with Luke’s account of Levi might sound like one of those convenient Christian rationalizations whereby we avoid the clear implications of Jesus’s teaching and example so that we might live more or less as we lived before encountering Jesus. So, let me be clear. If we think following Jesus does not involve sacrifice, if we believe we can keep all of our stuff for ourselves, then we’re missing an essential element of discipleship. But the example of Levi shows us that leaving behind isn’t so much abandoning everything as it is repurposing everything for the kingdom of God. Sometimes this means selling our homes and giving the proceeds to our Christian community (see Acts 4:32-37). At other times this means devoting our homes to hospitality for the sake of Christ, as was true of Levi.

Reflect

In what ways do you relate to the example of Levi?

Are you really using “your stuff” for the sake of Christ?

Might the Lord be moving in you to be more hospitable? More generous? More sacrificial in how you live and what you do with your stuff?

Act

Ask the Lord if he would like you to do something different or new with some of your stuff? Perhaps you could share it with others? Or maybe it’s time to sell something and donate the proceeds? Or . . . ?

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for the example of Levi. As we read his story, we are encouraged to think about how we might wisely “leave everything behind.” Help us to know what’s best, Lord. May we be willing to see all of our stuff and all of our relationships for you and your purposes. Teach us to sacrifice freely and to serve generously. May our hospitality draw other to you and your generous grace. To you be all the glory. Amen.


Part 32: Using Your Stuff for Kingdom Purposes

Scripture – Luke 5:27-28 (NRSV)

After this [Jesus] went out and saw a tax collector named Levi, sitting at the tax booth; and he said to him, “Follow me.” And he got up, left everything, and followed him.

Then Levi gave a great banquet for him in his house; and there was a large crowd of tax collectors and others sitting at the table with them.

For context, you can read Luke 5:27-32 here.

Focus

When we follow Jesus, we learn to think differently about “our stuff.” Whether we have relatively little or whether we have a lot, all of our possessions ultimately belong to the Lord and are committed to his work. What this means for each of us will vary with our circumstances and calling. But we will share together in a life of hospitality and generosity.

Devotion

In the last two Life for Leaders devotions we have examined the story of Levi, the tax collector whom Jesus called to follow him. Yesterday, we reflected on the fact that following Jesus leads us to a whole new way of thinking about “our stuff.” In some cases, we will donate our stuff or its value to needy individuals or worthy organizations. In other cases, like Levi, we will use our stuff for the sake of Christ and his mission.

Before we leave Levi to move on in the Gospel of Luke, I’d like to share three brief stories of people using their stuff for Christ and his purposes. I hope to illustrate a variety of responses from a variety of Jesus followers.

The first story comes from my time in college. During my senior year at Harvard, a bunch of us from the Christian fellowship were invited by a Black Pentecostal church in Bridgeport, Connecticut to join them for a weekend retreat. About thirty of us—mainly Anglos and Asians who were not Pentecostal, by the way—took them up on this generous offer. Not only did the Bridgeport folks lead the retreat for us, but also they put us up in their homes and fed us fantastic food (my first experience of soul food, by the way). Four of our group crowded into the pastor’s modest apartment, but he and his family didn’t seem to mind the obvious inconvenience. They helped us feel warmly welcomed and truly at home.

The next story happened several years later. In the summer of 1986 my dad died of cancer at the age of 54. As the end of the year drew near, my extended family and I began to worry about Christmas. It didn’t seem right to “do Christmas” as we always had. Yet it didn’t seem right to skip Christmas, either. We had limited funds so couldn’t envision something creative for our whole family. Then a friend of my mom approached her with an opportunity. She and her husband had a second home near Palm Springs, California, and would be glad to let us use it for Christmas vacation. When my mom mentioned the large size of our extended family, her friend said that would be no problem. Their “home” was really more of a compound, with several cottages, tennis court, swimming pool, and a giant main house. I can’t even imagine how much it would have cost to rent that place in prime season. But my mom’s friend wanted us to use it free of charge. So that Christmas my family and I spent five days celebrating, grieving, and relaxing in luxury unlike anything we had ever known. While there, I read the guest register and realized that my mom’s friend and her husband gave away their place to hundreds of people each year: church groups, Young Life groups, inner city mission groups, etc.

My third story comes from my time as a pastor in Irvine, California. One day, a member of my church came to see me. She shared with me that she was moving away from Irvine and would be leaving our church. She wanted me to know that she planned to tithe on the sale of her house—not just the increase in value, but the sale. She was excited to do this as an act of gratitude to God for our church. Now, without asking I knew that two things were true. First, homes in Irvine were selling at high prices and her gift would be substantial. Second, this dear woman was not a person of significant means. Her husband had left her several years ago and she struggled as a single mother. The church had actually helped her with a few financial challenges along the way. So I was stunned by her generosity. I even tried to suggest that she could give less, but she’d have none of it. She loved our church and loved the Lord and loved the idea that she could give generously from the sale of her home.

Each of these stories illustrates a different way of responding to the call of Jesus. Each one inspires me to consider how I might grow in generosity, hospitality, and sacrificial living. I hope these stories will inspire you too.

Reflect

How do you respond to the three stories in this devotion?

Have you ever experienced anything like that described in one of the stories?

How are you able to use your stuff for God’s purposes?

Act

With your small group or a wise friend, talk about how you might become more generous and hospitable with what God has entrusted to you.

Pray

Lord Jesus, today I thank you for experiences I have had of your people being generous and hospitable. I thank you for those who have been willing to sacrifice for the sake of your kingdom and its people.

I ask, Lord, that you help me to learn from those who model generosity, hospitality, and sacrifice. Help me to be like them as I seek to follow you in tangible ways. Amen.


Part 33: New Wine and New Wineskins

Scripture – Luke 5:36-39 (NRSV) 

[Jesus] also told them a parable: “No one tears a piece from a new garment and sews it on an old garment; otherwise the new will be torn, and the piece from the new will not match the old. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; otherwise the new wine will burst the skins and will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. And no one after drinking old wine desires new wine, but says, ‘The old is good.’”

Focus

Jesus proclaimed the new wine of the kingdom of God, adding that new wine requires new wineskins. This is true today as well. The message of God’s grace, mercy, justice, and love in Jesus challenges us to new ways of living in each generation. We ask: How does the gospel impel us to act in time of a global pandemic? How does the reign of God impact our efforts to bring racial justice to our society? How might I learn to love my neighbors in new ways?

Devotion

Though Jesus experienced considerable popularity early in his messianic ministry, his message was often perplexing to his listeners and his behavior confusing. For example, the disciples of Jesus did not fast, but ate and drank freely. This confused folk who were trying to figure Jesus out because, in that culture, serious religious people frequently fasted (Luke 5:33).

But Jesus was bringing a new message and that new message deserved new practices. To illustrate this truth, Jesus told a couple of parables: “No one tears a piece from a new garment and sews it on an old garment; otherwise the new will be torn, and the piece from the new will not match the old. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; otherwise the new wine will burst the skins and will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins” (Luke 5:36-38).

Both of these parables were based on behaviors that were commonplace in the culture of Jesus. People knew not to patch an old garment with a piece from a new garment because doing so would ruin both of them (Luke 5:36). And one would not put new wine (i.e. grape juice) into an old wineskin, because the fermentation of the juice would cause it to expand, thus splitting the old wineskin, which was not supple like a new wineskin. Thus, people knew to put new wine into new wineskins.

Jesus’s basic point is fairly clear. He was bringing new wine, a new message, a new reality. Now, to be sure, in many ways the ministry of Jesus was consistent with and a fulfillment of what God had done and revealed in the past. But it was also new in at least two ways. First, it was dramatically new in comparison to the message of the Pharisees and other Jewish teachers, who were focused on the interpretation and application of the old Mosaic law. Second, the message of Jesus was new in that he proclaimed the reign of God as a present and future reality. God’s kingdom was active in Jesus, in all he said and did. This novelty demanded new ways of thinking and acting. So, for example, the disciples of Jesus were celebrating God’s kingdom by eating and drinking, rather than emphasizing self-denial by fasting.

Today, we who seek to follow Jesus are living in the newness of God’s kingdom, thanks to the death and resurrection of Jesus and the gift of the Holy Spirit. We are enjoying the new wine of the gospel. Yet we face a temptation similar to that of the serious religious folk in Jesus’s day. We can find it easy to contain the new wine of Jesus in the wineskins of our familiar religious practices. We are nervous if not resistant when gospel points to new ways of being and doing. We prefer to reuse our old wineskins because they are comfortable and reassuring.

In future devotions I want to explore with you some implications of Jesus’s new wine/old wineskins parable. For now, however, let me encourage you to reflect on what Jesus has said and how it might speak to you today.

Reflect

How do you respond to what Jesus says about new wine and old wineskins? What does this make you think about? What feelings does it evoke in you?

Can you think of a time in your life when you chose “new wineskins” in response to the “new wine” of Christ? If so, when was this? What was it like to make that change?

Do you sense that the Lord might be leading you to choose “new wineskins” in your life today? If so, what might these be?

Act

Talk with your small group or a wise friend about the “wineskins” of your lives. Think together about how your life is shaped according to the gospel.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for the new wine you offer. Thank you for the good news of the kingdom of God. Thank you for the renewing work of your Spirit in my life.

Help me, Lord, to continue to receive and respond to your new wine. Show me the “wineskins” of my life that need to be retired. Help me to be open to the new work you want to do in and through me today, and in the days ahead. Amen.


Part 34: The Disruption of Wine and Wineskins

Scripture – Luke 5:36-39 (NRSV)

[Jesus] also told them a parable: “No one tears a piece from a new garment and sews it on an old garment; otherwise the new will be torn, and the piece from the new will not match the old. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; otherwise the new wine will burst the skins and will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. And no one after drinking old wine desires new wine, but says, ‘The old is good.’”

Focus

God wants to do a new thing in our lives. Sometimes this new thing involves minor adjustments. Sometimes it means a radical reordering of how we live. When we are willing to surrender what is familiar and comfortable in order to step out in obedience to God, an amazing adventure lies ahead. God will do new things in us and through us for his purposes and glory.

Devotion

In yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion we examined Jesus’s parable about wine and wineskins. I talked about how the new wine of the gospel challenges us to adopt new wineskins, even though we generally prefer the old wineskins because they are familiar friends. In today’s devotion I’d like to share with you how this passage from Luke, with its teaching on wine and wineskins, disrupted my own life.

In January of 2007 I was the Senior Pastor of a church in Southern California. In that role, I was preaching through the Gospel of Luke. When it was time to preach on Luke 5:36-39, I delivered an unusually passionate sermon in which I challenged my people to be open to the “new wine” of the gospel and the “new wineskins” God might have for their lives. I acknowledged that we tend to prefer the “old wineskins” because they are comfortable. New wineskins, I admitted, can feel pretty scary.

As I preached that sermon, little did I know that God would soon be challenging the wineskins of my life. Through a series of unexpected events, I found myself confronting the possibility of leaving my pastorate in California and taking a new position in a retreat center in Texas. Though I had the highest regard for that retreat center and its people, I found terrifying the thought of leaving behind my old, reliable wineskins in California: my church, friends, extended family, home, and community. My wife shared my feelings and, of course, had a bunch of her own. The scariest part of all for us was removing our children from a great church, a loving family, excellent schools, and wonderful friends, right as they were entering their teenage years. What! Were we crazy to consider the new wineskins in Texas? It took Linda and me several months to figure out what we believed God wanted us to do . . . and what we were willing to do in response.

Irvine Presbyterian in mirror

I took this photo on my last day as pastor of Irvine Presbyterian Church, as I began my drive to Texas.

In the end, we believed that God wanted us to have new wineskins in Texas. By grace, we were able to trust that God would be in this move with us. So we left California and moved to Texas, where we spent some amazing years filled with more blessings than we had imagined. But there were also many losses for us, things we needed to grieve along the way. It’s almost always like that when it comes to switching out wineskins.

When I look back on how God used Luke 5:36-39 in the life of my family, I feel tremendous gratitude. This passage changed the course of our lives in astounding and marvelous ways. Yet, I confess that I approach Jesus’s teaching about wine and wineskins with trepidation. I know how much power to disrupt my life is present in this parable. Yet, I also know how much new wine God is able to pour into our lives when we’re willing to accept the new wineskins he has for us.

In many ways, it all boils down to trust. If I believe God is calling me to something new, will I trust him? Or not? I’d like to say that I would always choose to trust God. But sometimes I find myself preferring what is familiar, known, and seemingly under my control. I want to hang on to my old wineskins. Yet, deep down, I know that God is trustworthy, that whatever God has for me is best, that the new wineskins are worth discarding the old. Most of all, I want to be a willing, open, expandable vessel for God’s new wine, the reality of his kingdom offered through Jesus Christ.

Reflect

Have you had an experience in your life rather like what I have described in this devotion? What happened and what was it like for you?

What makes it hard for you to give up your “old wineskins”?

What encourages you to take up “new wineskins”?

Act

Take some time to think through your life, remembering times when you trusted God in exceptional ways. Consider how God has led you and blessed you. Offer thanks for his goodness and for the gift of “new wineskins.”

Pray

Gracious God, thank you for the new wine you give us through Christ. Thank you for choosing to put your new wine in us. Help us, we pray, to choose the new wineskins you have for us. When you’re leading us to something new, something unknown, even scary, may we trust you to be faithful.

O Lord, pour into us once again your new wine, for your purposes and glory. Amen.


Part 35: Wine, Wineskins, and the Challenge of Leadership

Scripture – Luke 5:36-38 (NRSV)

[Jesus] also told them a parable: “No one tears a piece from a new garment and sews it on an old garment; otherwise the new will be torn, and the piece from the new will not match the old. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; otherwise the new wine will burst the skins and will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. And no one after drinking old wine desires new wine, but says, ‘The old is good.’”

Focus

Whether you lead a church or a business, a school or a city, a factory or a family, a studio or a store, effective leadership in today’s world means change leadership. In a time of major global upheaval and societal disruption, change is required, now more than ever. It is necessary for surviving, not to mention thriving. Thus, our leadership will be inspired by “new wine” and will help our people create and embrace “new wineskins.” But wise change leadership will also acknowledge the reality of loss, helping our people grieve their “old wineskins” so they might be prepared to embrace the new thing God is doing among them.

Devotion

In the Life for Leaders devotions from Saturday and Sunday, I have been reflecting with you on Jesus’s parable about wine and wineskins. On Saturday I suggested that the new wine of the gospel challenges us in our own lives to be open to the new wineskins God might have for us, even through this requires giving up our familiar old wineskins. Yesterday, I shared a story of how this passage from Luke challenged me to give up old wineskins in order to accept the new ones God had for me. I talked about how necessary it is to trust God if we’re going to adopt his new wineskins.

Today, I’d like to reflect on how the teaching of Jesus about wine and wineskins relates to the challenge of leadership. Using Jesus’s imagery, we might say that visionary leaders bring new wine in need of new wineskins in their organizations. We who lead generally believe that our new vision is good news. It offers new ways of thinking, feeling, acting, and being. It proposes new ways of being in community together, whether in a workplace, a city, or a church. It conveys the promise of flourishing in ways we have not experienced before.

Yet the good news of a new vision from a leader isn’t the whole story. As Ronald Heifetz and Marty Linsky write in Leadership on the Line, “ If leadership were about giving people good news, the job would be easy” (p. 11). The news we bring may be good from our perspective, but not necessarily from those who are hearing this news. As Heifetz and Linsky observe, “You appear dangerous to people when you question their values, beliefs, or habits of a lifetime. You place yourself on the line when you tell people what they need to hear rather than what they want to hear. Although you may see with clarity and passion a promising future of progress and gain, people will see with equal passion the losses you are asking them to sustain” (p. 12).

There’s one of the biggest challenges for any leader: I’m talking about “the losses” you are asking your people to sustain. The reality of new wine requires giving up of old wineskins, wineskins that are familiar, comfortable, traditional, perhaps even profitable and beloved. Human beings don’t like giving up such things. As Heifetz and Linsky write, “People do not resist change, per se. People resist loss” (p. 11). To use the language of Jesus, people are not necessarily resistant to new wine or even to new wineskins. They resist losing old wineskins and even prefer old wine. As Jesus said, “And no one after drinking old wine desires new wine, but says, ‘The old is good’” (5:39).

One of the greatest leadership challenges I faced in life happened when I became senior pastor of a church in Southern California. The church I inherited had a marvelous tradition of beautiful, classical, traditional, thoughtful, choir-led worship. Many church members loved the way we worshiped and were strongly committed to preserving our forms of worship. Yet, I discovered, many others in the church found our worship to be overly intellectual, staid, too traditional, and too structured. They longed for more contemporary forms and more spontaneity.

I believed that the new wine of the gospel would require new forms of worship. But I also believed that faithfulness to the gospel meant nurturing our unity as a church and respecting the worship life of the community. I spent several years trying to help my church adopt new wineskins, grieve necessary losses, embrace traditions worth maintaining, all the while loving each other as brothers and sisters in Christ. I had some successes and some failures. But I know God was helping me lead my people through loss and change so that we might be an effective conduit of the gospel.

Whether you lead a church or a business, a school or a city, a factory or a family, a studio or a store, effective leadership in today’s world means change leadership. In a time of major global upheaval and societal disruption, change is required, now more than ever. It is necessary for surviving, not to mention thriving. Thus, our leadership will be inspired by the “new wine” and will help our people create and embrace the “new wineskins.” But wise change leadership will also acknowledge the reality of loss, helping our people grieve their “old wineskins” so they might be prepared to embrace the new thing God is doing among them.

Reflect

Do you agree with Heifetz and Linsky in their statement: “People do not resist change, per se. People resist loss”?

Can you personally relate to what Heifetz and Linsky have written here?

How can leaders help their people both grieve losses and embrace innovation?

Act

If you’re not familiar with the leadership writings of Ronald Heifetz and Marty Linsky, you might start with this helpful summary from Harvard Business Review: “A Survival Guide for Leaders.” For the application of Heifetz and Linsky’s leadership model to churches, be sure to read Tod Bolsinger’s book, Canoeing the Mountains: Christian Leadership in Uncharted Territory. Also, you might wish to pre-order a book by Scott Cormode of the De Pree Center. The Innovative Church: How Leaders and their Congregations Can Adapt in an Ever-Changing World will be out in September 2020.

Pray

Gracious God, thank you for giving us the chance to share in your work in the world through our leadership. Thank you for helping us to lead effectively, with wisdom, justice, and love.

Help us, we pray, in the effort to lead change. We understand that people are attached to what is familiar, that they are not eager to change. Give us wisdom to help our people grieve. Give them the courage to embrace the “new wineskins” of change. May our organizations flourish by your grace and for your purposes. Amen.


Part 36: An Unexpected Lord

Scripture – Luke 6:1-5 (NRSV)

One sabbath while Jesus was going through the grainfields, his disciples plucked some heads of grain, rubbed them in their hands, and ate them. But some of the Pharisees said, “Why are you doing what is not lawful on the sabbath?” Jesus answered, “Have you not read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God and took and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and gave some to his companions?” Then he said to them, “The Son of Man is lord of the sabbath.”

Focus

From the earliest days of Christianity, followers of Jesus have claimed that he is Lord. This claim not only recognizes the deity of Jesus, but also acknowledges his rightful authority over our lives. We live under the gracious, merciful, wise, and just lordship of Jesus Christ. In all we do and all we say, in every time and place, we proclaim the Jesus is Lord.

Devotion

Luke 6 begins with two stories about Jesus and the Sabbath. If we’re going to get the full impact of these stories, we need to remember just how important the Sabbath was to the Jewish people. Established by God in creation (Genesis 2:1-3) and affirmed in the Ten Commandments as something essential for right living (Exodus 20:8-11), the Sabbath was central to Jewish life and faith. Setting aside a day of week for rest, not work, also set the Jews apart from all others in the ancient world. Sabbath keeping, therefore, became a fundamental marker of Jewish identity.

The basic rule of Sabbath keeping was that all ordinary work, except work required to sustain or defend life, was to cease on the Sabbath day. Jewish teachers and scholars, not satisfied with basic guidance, worked hard to define with precision exactly what honoring the Sabbath required, what one could do and what one could not do. In their view, any faithful Jew must follow the specific rules they developed.

These rules stipulated that it was wrong to harvest grain or prepare food on the Sabbath. But the disciples of Jesus “plucked some heads of grain, rubbed them in their hands, and ate them” (Luke 6:1). According to the legal interpretations developed by the Pharisees, the disciples had done “what is not lawful on the Sabbath” (Luke 6:2). They asked Jesus to account for the Sabbath-breaking behavior of his followers.

Jesus responded by pointing to a story in 1 Samuel 21:3-6 in which David and his companions ate special bread that was reserved for the priests according to Leviticus 24:5-9. So, on the surface, David and his entourage broke the law. But, in Jesus’s view, their behavior was acceptable because, in this particular case, human need took precedence over strict application of the law. By implication, the hunger of Jesus’s disciples made their act of plucking and eating a few grains okay, even though it violated the Pharisees’ interpretation of the Sabbath law.

At this point, the Pharisees might well have thought to themselves, “Who is this man to school us about the meaning of God’s law? We are the experts. This is an unlearned commoner.” But Jesus explained his authority in a way that was even more shocking than his view of the Sabbath. He said, “The Son of Man is lord of the sabbath” (Luke 6:5). “Son of Man” was a Jewish title Jesus used frequently in relationship to himself. We’ll examine the meaning of this title later in this series. In the present context, we need to understand that Jesus was saying, in effect: “I am the lord of the Sabbath. I am the one who has the authority to interpret the Sabbath law. I am the one who gets to determine the rightful purpose and practice of the Sabbath.”

Once again we are confronted with the unexpected authority of Jesus, now in relationship both to biblical interpretation and to the Sabbath. Later, I’ll have more to say about the Sabbath. Today, I want to end with some simple questions having to do with the authority of Jesus in your life.

Reflect

Does Jesus function as Lord over your life? If so, in what ways is this true?

Do you ever think of Jesus as the one with authority to interpret the Bible today?

How might Jesus help you to as you seek to understand and live in obedience to Scripture?

Act

If there is a passage of Scripture that you find difficult to understand or to put into practice, ask Jesus to help you with this. His Spirit is present with you to guide your thinking and behavior. Seek his guidance.

Pray

Jesus, you are indeed the Lord. You are Lord over the Sabbath. You are Lord over the interpretation of Scripture. You are Lord over heaven and earth. And you are Lord over my life. Today, I offer myself to you: my commitment, my obedience. Teach me your ways. Lead me into your truth. Help me to know how to follow you faithfully each day in all that I do. Amen.


Part 37: Is Jesus the Lord of Your Sabbath?

Scripture – Luke 6:1-5 (NRSV) 

One sabbath while Jesus was going through the grainfields, his disciples plucked some heads of grain, rubbed them in their hands, and ate them. But some of the Pharisees said, “Why are you doing what is not lawful on the sabbath?” Jesus answered, “Have you not read what David did when he and his companions were hungry? He entered the house of God and took and ate the bread of the Presence, which it is not lawful for any but the priests to eat, and gave some to his companions?” Then he said to them, “The Son of Man is lord of the sabbath.”

Focus

God has designed you for work and rest. God has given to all of us – including you – the gift of Sabbath, a day for refreshment and renewal. Jesus claims to be Lord of the Sabbath, and this means he is Lord over your Sabbath. He wants you to experience renewing rest. He is glad to help you discover what this means in your life.

Devotion

Yesterday, I began looking at Luke 6:1-5, a story about the Sabbath and the authority of Jesus. That story ended with Jesus making a shocking claim: “The Son of Man is lord of the sabbath” (Luke 6:5). Jesus, adopting the Jewish title “Son of Man” for himself, claimed to have primary authority over the Sabbath, that is, over the day of weekly rest. He had the right to determine the purpose of the Sabbath and to stipulate what kinds of behavior were appropriate and inappropriate on the Sabbath.

Some Christians believe that Jesus abolished the Sabbath. This is certainly a misreading of Jesus’s actions and teaching with regard to the weekly day of rest. Though he rejected many of the legalisms of the Pharisees with respect to Sabbath observance, Jesus did not abolish God’s intentions that humankind should set aside one day a week for rest. Jesus claimed to be Lord of the Sabbath, not its destroyer. In the Gospel of Mark, he made it clear that “the sabbath was made for humankind” (Mark 2:27). In other words, God created the Sabbath for our benefit. It is a gift for us, an opportunity for rest, refreshment, and renewal. The Sabbath is a time for us to refocus on God and God’s purposes, as well as to enjoy God’s many blessings. Jesus, as Lord of the Sabbath, will help us learn to delight in this special day (Isaiah 58:13).

Jesus claimed to be the Lord of the Sabbath. So I have question for you: Is Jesus the Lord of your Sabbath? I could ask more broadly: Is Jesus the Lord of how you spend your time? But I’m wondering especially about whether you have built into your life God-designed times of regular rest?

The boots of two people sitting and looking out over the SierraThroughout the centuries Christians have differed about what it means to honor the Sabbath. Some argue for a complete day of rest. Others allow for partial days. Some believe that rest should happen on the seventh day of the week (Saturday). Others support Sunday as the best time for rest and celebration of Jesus’s resurrection. There have been seemingly endless debates about what Christians should do and not do on the Sabbath. I am amused by the fact that some Christians have argued that the Sabbath was only for the worship of God, and therefore a Christian should not take a nap on the Lord’s Day. Somewhere along the line they seemed to have missed the part about rest.

I expect followers of Jesus will always differ on the details when it comes to the Sabbath. But what concerns me today is how common it is for followers of Jesus to have no interest in or commitment to a regular rhythm of work and rest. For many of us, every day of the week is equally a day of work. Or, if we take a break from paid work, we fill our time with a flurry of activities. Many Christians have very little experience of anything that might be called Sabbath.

If this hits home for you, let me say that I’m not trying to make you feel guilty. From my own experience, I know how hard it can be to make time for regular rest. My point isn’t to make you feel bad, but rather to remind you that God has designed you for work and rest. God has given to all of us – including you – the gift of Sabbath. Jesus claims to be Lord, not only over the Sabbath, but also over your Sabbath. He wants you to experience renewing rest and he is glad to help you discover what this means in your life.

Reflect

As you think about your life past and present, what experience do you have with intentional Sabbath observance?

Do you set aside time each week for rest? If so, why? If not, why not?

What would it take for you to let Jesus be the Lord over your Sabbath observance?

Act

Talk with your small group or with a wise friend about your experiences of Sabbath. Come up with specific practices that you want to build into your life. Find ways to support each other as you seek to experience the gift of Sabbath.

Pray

Jesus, you are indeed the Lord of the Sabbath. And this means you are also rightly the Lord over my Sabbath. Teach me what the Sabbath means for my life. May I seek your guidance for how I might experience a regular rhythm of work and rest. May I find others who can walk with me on this path of discovery. Help me, Lord, to receive your gift of Sabbath with delight. Amen.


Part 38: The Purpose of the Sabbath

Scripture – Luke 6:6-10 (NRSV)

On another sabbath he entered the synagogue and taught, and there was a man there whose right hand was withered. The scribes and the Pharisees watched him to see whether he would cure on the sabbath, so that they might find an accusation against him. Even though he knew what they were thinking, he said to the man who had the withered hand, “Come and stand here.” He got up and stood there. Then Jesus said to them, “I ask you, is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the sabbath, to save life or to destroy it?” After looking around at all of them, he said to him, “Stretch out your hand.” He did so, and his hand was restored.

Focus

The fact that Jesus healed on the Sabbath gives us freedom to consider how we might engage in the ministry of healing in our own context. Our works of healing might certainly include praying for the sick, so that they might be well. But our works of healing might also include loving children as a Sunday School teacher, feeding folks who struggle with hunger and homelessness, joining a public gathering to pray for justice in our land, or reaching out to foster reconciliation in a broken relationship. Yes, the Sabbath is meant for rest. But it is also a day for restoration, restoration we receive and restoration to which we contribute.

Devotion

Luke 6 opens with a story about Jesus and the Sabbath. In response to a query from the Pharisees, Jesus claims to be “lord of the sabbath” (Luke 6:5). He has the authority to determine what is appropriate behavior on the seventh day of rest.

The next passage in Luke 6 relates another encounter between Jesus and the scribes and the Pharisees in which the Sabbath is the main theme. In this episode, Jesus was teaching in the synagogue when he became aware of a man who had a withered hand. The Jewish authorities watched Jesus closely because, if he healed the man on the sabbath, then Jesus would be breaking the sabbath law as they understood it. Healing, after all, was a kind of work.

Jesus, who knew what the leaders were thinking, invited the man with the withered hand to come forward. Before healing him, Jesus said his adversaries, “I ask you, is it lawful to do good or to do harm on the sabbath, to save life or destroy it” (Luke 6:9).  Jesus knew that the Pharisees would allow good to be done only in a life or death situation. Healing a man’s hand wouldn’t be such a necessity. Yet, in the way Jesus framed the question, the choice was to do good or harm, to save life or to destroy life. So the Pharisees were silent. In fact, they were also furious (Luke 6:11).

When the Jewish leaders failed to respond, Jesus said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” As he did, his hand was “restored” (Luke 6:10). For Jesus, the Lord of the Sabbath, the “work” of healing was appropriate on the Sabbath, even when the situation was not life or death. Restoration is central to the day of rest, whether it’s the restoration of soul that comes through quiet reflection, the restoration of body that comes through rest, or the restoration of brokenness that comes through healing.

For those of us who are inclined to be restless doers, this story from Luke could be a bit dangerous. It might suggest to us that we fill up our Sabbath with so many good works that we end up more exhausted than when the Sabbath began. Surely this would not be what Jesus has in mind for us. Yet, the fact that Jesus healed on the Sabbath gives us freedom to consider how we might engage in the ministry of healing in our own context. Our works of healing might certainly include praying for the sick, so that they might be well. But our works of healing might also include loving children as a Sunday School teacher, feeding folks who struggle with hunger and homelessness, joining a public gathering to pray for justice in our land, or reaching out to foster reconciliation in a broken relationship. Yes, the Sabbath is meant for rest. But it is also a day for restoration, restoration we receive and restoration to which we contribute.

Reflect

How do you respond to the story in Luke 6:6-11?

In what ways do you do good on the Sabbath?

How might you be an instrument of God’s healing in your part of the world?

Act

As you approach your next day of rest, ask the Lord if there is anything he would like you to do, any good work or acts of healing he has for you. If something comes to mind as you pray, make plans to do it.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for being the one who heals us. Thank you for making your priorities clear. Thank you for your compassion and power. Thank you for healing the man with the withered hand, even on the Sabbath.

Help me, Lord, to know how I can honor you as I honor the Sabbath. Teach me to stop working and to rest. But, I pray, help me also to know when I need to join you in your work of healing. May I be a channel of your restoration in the part of the world to which you have sent me. Amen.


Part 39: The Extraordinary Value of Wholeness

Scripture – Luke 8:32-33 (NRSV)

Now there on the hillside a large herd of swine was feeding; and the demons begged Jesus to let them enter these. So he gave them permission. Then the demons came out of the man and entered the swine, and the herd rushed down the steep bank into the lake and was drowned.

Focus

Jesus wants you to be whole. Yes, the cost of becoming whole is great, more than you could ever afford. But Jesus paid the price, giving up his life so that you might be healed from all the brokenness in your life. What good news!

Devotion

Today’s Life for Leaders devotion comes from one of the more curious and unsettling stories in the Gospels. The story begins after a scary boat trip from the western side of the Sea of Galilee to the eastern side. This trip, as you may recall, involved Jesus sleeping soundly during a giant storm. Then, having been roused by his disciples, Jesus commanded the storm to stop and it did, much to the puzzled wonder of the disciples.

When Jesus and his retinue arrived on the eastern side of the Sea, they encountered a man tormented by demons. Jesus commanded the spirit to leave the man, but it put up a fight, begging not to be sent to the abyss. Rather, they asked to enter a nearby herd of pigs. Then Jesus did a most surprising thing. Appearing to accept the demons’ appeal – there turned out to be many demons who had possessed the man – Jesus gave the demons permission to enter the pigs. When they did this, however, the herd rushed down into the Sea of Galilee and drowned.

Now, when the people of that area heard what happened, they were none too happy. After all, Jesus had been responsible for the death of a herd of pigs, thus depriving people both of food and their livelihood. It’s no surprise that they asked Jesus to leave, especially given his peculiar engagement with evil spirits.

When I was younger, this story disturbed me. I was happy enough that Jesus delivered a man from demonic bondage, but I just couldn’t understand why he let the demons enter the herd of pigs. When telling this story, the Gospel of Mark mentions that 2,000 pigs had been killed. This seemed terribly unfair to the owner of the herd. I fretted about why Jesus did such an odd and apparently unkind thing.

I don’t think we can know exactly what motivated Jesus to let the demons enter the herd of pigs. Speculations about Jesus’s intentions cannot be verified in this case since the Gospels do not tell us why Jesus acted as he did. But one thing is sure: Jesus valued the wholeness of the demonized man so much that he was willing to put 2,000 pigs at risk. Jesus appeared to be willing to sacrifice the herd so that a man might be set free from his bondage and live as a free man.

This unusual story in Luke 8 reaffirms what we see throughout the Gospel. Jesus is deeply committed to the wholeness of people, not just physical wholeness, but complete wholeness in body, soul, mind, and relationships. Apparently, no cost is too great for a broken person to be made whole. Indeed, Jesus will ultimately give up his own life so that you and I might be made whole.

What is the cost of wholeness? It’s exorbitant. What’s the value of wholeness? It’s inestimable.

Reflect

How do you respond to the actions of Jesus in this story?

How have you experienced freedom and wholeness through Jesus?

Is there anything in your life from which you need to be set free today?

Act

Take some time to thank the Lord for all the ways he has healed you, making you whole.

You might also want to consider being in the Road Ahead program. I talked about this in yesterday’s devotion. I’m featuring it in Life for Leaders this week because we’re in the time of year when people are applying to be in the Road Ahead. If you want to learn more, check out this webpage.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I still don’t understand exactly why you let those demons enter the herd of pigs. I’ve read all sorts of explanations, but I’m not convinced that anybody has you figured out. Of course I don’t need to know why you did what you did. But I am curious, I must confess, and a bit perplexed.

So much more importantly, though, I recognize how much you valued the wholeness of the demonized man. Your focus was not upon demons or pigs, but upon this man and his potential for a full, flourishing life. Thank you for setting him free, for valuing him and his wholeness as much as you did.

Beyond this, Lord, I thank you for caring so much about my wholeness that you gave up your life for me. What an amazing gift! What amazing grace! Please help me to be open to all the ways you are still at work helping me to be whole. Amen.


Part 40: The Extraordinary Value of Wholeness, Part 2

Scripture – Luke 8:47-48 (NRSV)

When the woman saw that she could not remain hidden, she came trembling; and falling down before him, she declared in the presence of all the people why she had touched him, and how she had been immediately healed. He said to her, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace.”

Focus

Jesus came to bring wholeness to broken people, and even to a broken world. His salvation is not merely about physical healing or even life after death. It’s a matter of pervasive restoration. For individuals, it includes the healing of bodies, minds, hearts, and relationships. For the world, the wholeness of Jesus involves justice for the oppressed and peace for the creation.

Devotion

In yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion we saw just how much Jesus valued the wholeness of man who had been broken by demonic possession. Today, we see another dimension of Jesus’s commitment to human wholeness.

When Jesus returned to the western side of the Sea of Galilee, a synagogue leader prevailed upon him to come to his house and heal his daughter. On the way there, a woman with a terrible physical ailment sneaked up behind Jesus in a crowd and touched his clothing. Immediately she was healed. But Jesus, sensing that something powerful had just happened, stopped so that the woman was forced to reveal herself to Jesus and the crowd. She explained why she had touched him and how she had been healed. Jesus responded, “Daughter, your faith has made you well; go in peace” (Luke 8:48).

This story illustrates, as do many in Luke, that Jesus had the power to make people physically whole. In fact, it appears that he could heal without even knowing he was doing it! But, as amazing as this is, we learn more about Jesus’s commitment to wholeness from what happened after the healing miracle.

At first glance, Jesus’s behavior in this story might seem odd, even unkind. By making the woman reveal herself, he implicitly required her to openly admit what her problem had been. This required her to share intimate details of her life. But, even more, it meant that she had to admit to having been ceremonially unclean. Moreover, by touching Jesus as she had done, the woman compromised his ritual purity. This was a shocking thing in the culture of Jesus, something the crowd would have despised.

Yet Jesus didn’t leave the woman in her shame. First of all, he addressed her as “Daughter,” underscoring that she was a true member of the family of God (Luke 8:48). Second, he said, “your faith has made you well.” The verb translated here as “made you well” is actually the Greek verb rendered elsewhere as “to save” (sozo). In this context, it might well be translated as it is in The Message, “Now you’re healed and whole.”

By calling this woman out as Jesus did and by speaking to her as he did, Jesus granted her wholeness beyond mere physical healing. Her previous condition had cut her off from close relationships in her community. Her ritual impurity required a first-century version of social distancing. But once she was physically healed, she was eligible to be restored in a communal sense. Yet, for this to happen, a person in authority needed to vouch for her healing. That’s exactly what Jesus did.

This story is a moving illustration of the fact that Jesus is not concerned only about our physical wholeness. In fact, he’s not concerned only about our life beyond death. Rather, Jesus is committed to helping us become fully whole. And our own personal wholeness is not even the end of it. Jesus has come to bring wholeness to a broken creation, to unite all that has been shattered because of sin (see 2 Corinthians 5:17; Ephesians 1:9-10). Thus, the wholeness of Jesus includes justice for the oppressed and peace for the creation. We are blessed to be able to experience a measure of that wholeness in this age, even as we look forward to the complete wholeness of the age to come.

Reflect

Have you ever experienced the healing power of Jesus? If so, when? What happened?

How do you respond to the story in Luke 8:43-48? What thoughts does this story stir up in you? What feelings?

Who are some of the people in our day who are like the woman in this story, people in need of multiple facets of healing?

Act

Talk with your small group or a wise friend about how you might imitate the example of Jesus in your life. How might you bring wholeness to others?

If you’re wishing you had greater clarity about God’s callings in your life, you might want to consider our Road Ahead cohorts. You can learn more here.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I’m so glad Luke included this story in his Gospel. It is such a profound and moving account of your compassion and your commitment to wholeness.

Thank you, Lord, for not allowing the women to hide in the crowd. Though calling her out forced her to be vulnerable, it also allowed her to be made whole, not just physically, but also in relationship to her community.

Thank you, Jesus, for the ways you have brought wholeness to my life. Yet there is more to be done, as you know. So I ask you to heal me, to set me free from all that binds me, so that I might experience even more the wholeness of the age to come. Amen.


Part 41: How Can You Proclaim the Kingdom of God?

Scripture – Luke 9:1-2 (NRSV)

Then Jesus called the twelve together and gave them power and authority over all demons and to cure diseases, and he sent them out to proclaim the kingdom of God and to heal.

Focus

Jesus has sent us out to proclaim the kingdom of God. We have the responsibility and privilege of inviting people to live under God’s authority in every part of life. As we proclaim this message, we live it, acknowledging God’s reign over all of our life.

Devotion

In the beginning of Luke 9, Jesus sent out twelve of his disciples in order to extend his ministry throughout Galilee. He gave them power like his own, so that they could heal and cast out demons. He instructed them “to proclaim the kingdom of God and to heal” (Luke 9:2).

Those of us who follow Jesus today have a similar mandate. We have been filled with the power of the Holy Spirit so that we also might “proclaim the kingdom of God” and “heal.” In today’s devotion, I want to talk about how we proclaim the kingdom. On Monday I’ll consider how we can heal.

What does it mean to proclaim the kingdom of God? In this devotion, I have space to summarize a few main points. You can find more in-depth analysis in an article I have written, “Jesus and the Kingdom of God: What You Need to Know.”  To begin, it’s important to note that the kingdom of God is not the same as heaven, nor is it equal to the Church, nor is it a physical place. It’s also not an interior state of mind, though the kingdom of God surely touches us our minds and hearts. In the preaching of Jesus, the kingdom of God is God’s reign, God’s rule, God’s authority over heaven and earth. When Jesus said that the kingdom of God has come near, he meant that God was coming to rule over all things. We see this in the Lord’s Prayer, for example, when Jesus taught us to pray, “Thy kingdom come. They will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” God’s kingdom is God’s will being done, whether in heaven or on earth.

In a curious way, Jesus proclaimed that kingdom of God as something that was coming in the future and as something that was present in his ministry. This has perplexed scholars and others who need a simpler version of the kingdom. But the “already and not yet” dimension of the kingdom of God was essential to the proclamation of Jesus. One who followed him began to experience God’s reign right away. Yet this experience was incomplete. The fulness of the kingdom of God was yet to come.

For a variety of historical reasons, Christians have often avoided the language of the kingdom of God. Mainly, I think, we have not understood it. But we have preferred to use similar language that covers almost the same bases. When we speak of the Lordship of Christ, we’re saying something virtually equivalent to the kingdom of God. We proclaiming the authority of Christ over all things, something we can experience now in part, something we will experience fully in God’s future.

So then, how can you and I proclaim the kingdom of God? Whether we use the language of God’s reign or Christ’s Lordship, we proclaim the kingdom when we acknowledge God as ruler over all. We proclaim the kingdom when we call people to live under God’s reign each day. We proclaim the kingdom when we uphold God’s justice and seek to have his righteousness pervade our world. We proclaim the kingdom in actions when we honor God’s authority over every part of our lives, our work, our relationships, our civic engagement, our use of money, and you name it.

So much more could be said about this, of course. I’ve actually written a lot more in the article I referenced above. The point I want to emphasize here is that proclaiming the kingdom of God isn’t only about going to heaven or being a good person. It’s about bringing everything in life – everything in the world – under the reign of God. Or, to paraphrase Jesus in Matthew 6, proclaiming the kingdom of God is calling people, including ourselves, to “strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness” (Matthew 6:33). And it’s showing how God, by his grace in Jesus, has opened up a way for us to live under his reign.

Reflect

When you hear the phrase “the kingdom of God,” what comes to mind for you?

Did my explanation of the kingdom of God make sense to you? Or did it seem strange, unlike what you have heard before?

To what extent do you seek to live your whole life under God’s reign?

Act

If what I’ve said about the kingdom of God is new to you, let me encourage you to read the online article I’ve written, “Jesus and the Kingdom of God: What You Need to Know.”

Once again, I want to encourage you to check out our Road Ahead initiative if you’re in a transitional time in your life and work.

Pray

Lord Jesus, even as you once sent out your first disciples to preach the good news of the kingdom of God, so you have sent us. Help us, Lord, to understand your kingdom, to proclaim it, to live it. May we bring every facet of our lives under your authority. May we seek first your kingdom and righteousness in all that we do and say. To you be the glory! Amen.


Part 42: What Jesus’s Miracles Reveal

Scripture – Luke 9:16-17 (NRSV)

And taking the five loaves and the two fish, he looked up to heaven, and blessed and broke them, and gave them to the disciples to set before the crowd. And all ate and were filled. What was left over was gathered up, twelve baskets of broken pieces.

Focus

The miracles of Jesus reveal him to be a person who cares about the well-being of people. He seeks to make people whole in heart, soul, mind, and strength. His miracles also reveal his extraordinary power as one who is able to exercise the very power of God. But when Jesus does that which God alone can do, this tells us something more . . . much more about Jesus.

Devotion

Jesus often did extraordinary things, things beyond the ability of ordinary mortals. Even those who did not acknowledge his messianic identity knew that Jesus was something special. Ancient Jewish rabbis, for example, accused Jewish of doing “magic” or practicing “sorcery.” His amazing works revealed that he was either a trickster or someone who wielded demonic power.

Those of us who acknowledge Jesus as the Messiah see his actions from a different perspective. Consider, for example, the story in Luke 9:12-17. Jesus had been teaching a crowd of over 5,000 people. As evening approached, his disciples told Jesus to send the people away so they could get something to eat. But Jesus told the disciples to give the people something to eat. Unfortunately, they were short on rations. “We have no more than five loaves and two fish – unless we are to go and buy food for all these people” (Luke 9:13).

I wonder if the disciples expected Jesus to say, “Oh, that won’t work. That’s way too much food. Let’s send them away.” Instead, he did a puzzling thing, instructing his disciples to organize the people into groups of about fifty. Then, blessing the five loaves and two fish, he broke them and gave them to the disciples to pass out to the crowd. Yet Jesus didn’t run out in a minute or so. As he broke the food, it kept multiplying. After everyone had eaten, they gathered up twelve baskets of leftovers. Amazing!

Don’t you wish you could have seen all of that with your own eyes?! I know I do. If nothing else, it revealed that Jesus had awesome superpowers. Yet there is something else. At least two “somethings” actually.

First, we see here Jesus’s concern for the physical well-being of people. This is consistent, of course, with his regularly healing people. Jesus wanted them to be physically well and, as we see in this story, well-fed. Surely Jesus cared about the souls of people. But he wasn’t concerned only for the immaterial. As the Incarnation of the God who created the physical world good, Jesus valued the world and especially its people.

Second, let me encourage you to put yourself in the place of the Jewish people who had gathered to listen to Jesus. There you were, out in a “deserted place” (Luke 9:12). The Greek word translated as “deserted place” is often rendered as “wilderness.” So, you’re out in the wilderness and very hungry. All of a sudden, Jesus produces food for you to eat in a most exceptional way. What might this remind you of? It’s likely that you would have remembered a time when your Jewish ancestors were in the wilderness and God fed them miraculously, in that case, with manna (see Exodus 16). If you were to reflect on this, you would surely have wondered what it said about Jesus. You considered him an inspired teacher, a prophet, a miracle worker, perhaps even the Messiah. But if Jesus miraculously fed you and the rest of the crowd in the wilderness, could it be that he was more than all of these?

The miracles of Jesus reveal him to be a person who cares about the well-being of people. He seeks to make people whole in heart, soul, mind, and strength. His miracles also reveal his extraordinary power as one who is able to exercise the very power of God. But when Jesus does that which God alone can do, this tells us something more . . . much more about Jesus.

Reflect

When you read this story of Jesus feeding the multitude, how do you respond? Are you curious? Perplexed? Impressed? Or????

Have you ever experienced something you would classify as a miracle? (I mean a supernatural act, not something like the “miracle” of childbirth, though this is surely a miracle of another kind.) What happened? Why do you think it was an unusual and miraculous work of God?

Why does it matter that Jesus was more than a human messiah, prophet, and healer? Why does it matter that he was God in human flesh?

Act

As you go about your work this week, pay attention to the full humanity of your colleagues. See if there is something you can do to care for those with whom you work in a tangible way.

Pray

Lord Jesus, sometimes when I read a story like this one in Luke 9, I am underwhelmed. I’m sorry to admit it. But this story is so familiar to me. How I wish I could experience it as if for the first time . . . as if I were actually there! Restore my wonder, Lord!

Thank you for caring for whole people, for our bodies as well as our souls, for our minds as well as our hearts, for our relationships as well as what’s inside of us. Thank you, Lord, for caring for all that I am, for wanting me to be whole. Help me, I pray, to care for others in a similar way.

Today, Lord, I am reminded that you are more than an amazing man. You are God in the flesh, God with us, Immanuel. Thank you for revealing yourself to us in actions that are both miraculous and compassionate. Thank you for showing us that God is not only powerful, but also loving. Amen.


Part 43: When Jesus Sends You Out on a Limb

Scripture – Luke 9:14-15 (NRSV)

For there were about five thousand men. And he said to his disciples, “Make them sit down in groups of about fifty each.” They did so and made them all sit down.

Focus

Sometimes Jesus asks us to do things that are risky, things that won’t be accomplished apart from supernatural help. In such times we might hold back, not wanting to look foolish. Or we can go out on a limb, stepping out in bold faith. Is Jesus asking you to do something today that requires his help? If so, are you willing to do it?

Devotion

In yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion we considered what the story of Jesus’s miraculous feeding on the crowd says about Jesus. Today, I want to reflect a bit more on this story, focusing on what it says about us in our relationship with Jesus.

You’ll recall the setup. Jesus had been teaching a large crowd of several thousand people. When evening came, the disciples urged Jesus to send them away so they could get dinner. Jesus responded by telling the disciples to feed them. But they told Jesus they didn’t have nearly enough food. In fact, they had just about exactly two “take out” dinners (or “to go,” “take away,” or “carry out,” depending on where you live).

What did Jesus do with this information? Well, for one thing he did not explain to his disciples what he was planning. Rather, he told them to get the people to sit down in groups of fifty, as if they were about to be fed.

Now, if you’re familiar with this story and how it ends you might miss the tension of this scene. Put yourselves into the story for a moment. You’re a disciple of Jesus. You’re also a sensible person and you know that you can’t serve thousands with two fish and five loaves of bread. Yet Jesus seems to believe there will be plenty of food. Moreover, he wants you to act as if this is true. He wants you to go out on a limb by acting as if food is coming. He expects you to put your reputation on the line.

One thing you know for sure. This is going to turn out badly unless Jesus does something amazing. There is no other happy ending to this story. You have seen Jesus do miracles before. Yet it’s one thing to have seen them in the past and still another thing to trust him for the next one, a big one at that. So you have a choice. You can be safe and pass on the “seating people for dinner” activity. Or you can go out on that limb, trusting Jesus for a miracle.

What would you do?

I’ll be honest with you. I’m not sure what I would do. I would surely be of two minds in the moment. Part of me would be thinking, “Hey, no way! I don’t want to look foolish.” And another part of me would think, “Well, Jesus has done amazing things in the past. He’s getting ready to do it again.” As I reflect on my past relationship with Jesus, I can remember times when I took the safe path. And I can think of times when I sensed Jesus calling me to something risky and, trusting him, I stepped out in faith and did what I believed he wanted me to do.

In the story in Luke 9, things turn out marvelously. Jesus produces a prodigious feast from a couple of box lunches. The disciples not only get to serve as hosts, but also they are first-hand witnesses to an extraordinary miracle. All good!

But, in my experience, sometimes things don’t turn out as we would hope, even when we attempt to go out on a limb for Jesus. In tomorrow’s devotion I reflect a bit further about why this is. For now, however, I’d like you to consider whether Jesus is calling you to something the requires risk-taking faith. It may be in your work or your personal life, in your family, neighborhood, or church. Perhaps you already know exactly what this is. Perhaps you need to wait upon the Lord for additional guidance. Or perhaps, at this moment, you are doing everything you need to be doing in obedience to the Lord. Let the following questions help you discern the call of Jesus in this moment.

Reflect

Can you think of a time in your life when you went out on a limb in obedience to Jesus? Why did you do this? What happened?

Do you sense that Jesus is calling you to something new today, something risky, something that will require his miraculous help? If so, what is it? What are your thoughts and feelings about this? If you are holding back, why?

Are you willing to ask the Lord if there is something he would like you to do that you’re not currently doing?

Act

If you are sensing strongly that Jesus wants you to do something, then let me encourage you to do it. If you aren’t sure, then ask the Lord for guidance.

Pray

Lord Jesus, first, I want to thank you for involving me in your work. It’s an extraordinary privilege to be one of your disciples in this day. It’s a wonder that you want to use me for your kingdom purposes. Thank you!

Yet, Lord, you know it isn’t always easy for me. Sometimes I sense your guidance but hold back. I can be fearful and hesitant. After all, I don’t want to fail. I don’t want to look foolish. Help me to trust you enough to go out on a limb when that’s what you call me to do.

Remind me, Lord, of your faithfulness in the past. Help me to remember your goodness and grace. Help me to trust you even when I am hesitant. Today, I offer to you all that I am. Use me for your purposes. May I even be willing to be a fool for you! Amen.


Part 44: Why Taking Risks for Jesus is Tricky

Scripture – Luke 9:14-15 (NRSV)

For there were about five thousand men. And he said to his disciples, “Make them sit down in groups of about fifty each.” They did so and made them all sit down.

Focus

Like he did with his first disciples, Jesus calls us to take risks for his sake. This can be tricky, in part because we can fail to discern Jesus’s guidance correctly. But going out on a limb for Jesus is also tricky because sometimes things don’t work out as we had hoped. Yet Jesus is honored when we say “yes” to him. And, no matter what happens, he is able to redeem, to heal, and to prepare us for what comes next.

Devotion

This week I have been reflecting on a story from Luke 9, in which Jesus miraculously feeds a crowd of thousands from just a couple of box lunches. In yesterday’s devotion we saw that Jesus asked his disciples to do something risky, something that might even have seemed foolish to them, so that he might work an impressive miracle. We wondered if Jesus is asking us to do something similar, something that requires bold faith as we trust Jesus to act through us.

Stepping out in obedience to Jesus is sometimes tricky. I’m not talking about the trickiness of trusting Jesus. Rather, I’m thinking about different kinds of trickiness that can hold me back in my obedience.

The first trickiness can actually be a reflection of godly humility and wisdom. I’m thinking of times when it seems as if Jesus is calling me to do something risky, but I’m not sure I have rightly discerned his guidance. I am all too aware of my own tendency to project onto Jesus my “stuff” – my desires, my ambition, my hopes. Just because I think Jesus wants me to do something does not mean I have rightly discerned his will. So my reticence to step out can be wise, pointing me to an extended season of spiritual discernment. It’s time for me to wait upon the Lord, to “get neutral” as my friend Terry Looper says, to seek counsel from wise brothers and sisters, to surrender my desires and agendas to the Lord. Of course—let me be clear—I can also rationalize my own reticence when I know clearly what the Lord wants me to do. So, again, discernment in a community is desperately needed here.

The second trickiness has to do with what happens when we step out in faith in response to the call of Jesus. Sometimes, as in the case of the miraculous feeding in Luke 9, things go swimmingly, just as we had hoped. But there are other times, times when we take risks for Jesus and things do not work out well—at least it seems to us that they haven’t. I think, for example, of a pastor friend who responded a few years ago to what he perceived to be God’s call to a new church. He truly sought God’s guidance and acted in obedience, moving his family, settling in a new community, and so forth. At first things seemed to confirm his willingness to go out on a limb for Jesus. But then, for lots of reasons, the limb started shaking. Before long, the limb was cut off. My friend wonders what happened? If he was obeying Christ’s guidance, why did things go poorly? Did he get it wrong at the beginning? Or are there times when, even if we act in faithfulness, things don’t work in a way that seems good to us?

If you put Trickiness #1 and Trickiness #2 together, you may appear to have good reason for not going out on a limb for Jesus. Isn’t it better to play it safe? I like safety as much as the next person, perhaps even more. But I know that Jesus calls us beyond our safety zone, into the realm of faithful and risky obedience. After all, consider his own life and ministry. It was anything but safe.

Moreover, when we truly step out in obedience to Jesus, he is honored. He knows the intentions of our hearts. He sees our desire to honor him and is honored. Our risky obedience is true worship. It’s an expression of genuine worship to our Lord.

Furthermore, I am convinced that if we don’t get it right, either in discernment or action, Jesus isn’t stuck. His promise of abundant life remains (John 10:10). Jesus is the human embodiment of the God who works in all things for good (Romans 8:28). So, when we go out on a limb for Jesus, sometimes the limb will be solid and, in time, abundantly fruitful. At other times we’ll fall off or the limb will be cut off. But in these times God is still with us. God is redeeming our mistakes, forgiving our sins, healing our wounds, removing our shame, teaching us lessons, and preparing us for what comes next.

Reflect

Do you find yourself in a place of uncertainty with regard to some aspect of the calling of Jesus upon your life? If so, what are you doing with this uncertainty?

When you need additional clarity about God’s will for your life, what do you do?

Have there been times in your life when you have stepped out in obedience to Jesus, yet things have not gone as you expected them to? What did you do in response to this disappointment?

Are you doing something in your life right now that is risky, and that is your response of trusting obedience to Jesus?

Act

Talk with your small group, your spiritual director, or a wise friend about how you go about discerning the call of Jesus in your life. See if there is anything you need to learn to do differently.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I am quite aware of my limitations when it comes to hearing your voice, to discerning your call. Sometimes I’m simply confused. At other times I project my desires onto you, claiming that you are guiding me when, in fact, I’m following my own wishes. Knowing this makes me hesitate when I sense that you’re calling me to something risky.

Help me, I pray, to be wise in discernment. Teach me to wait upon you. May I trust the brothers and sisters you have brought into my life to help me hear you well. And then, Lord, may I be bold in obedience.

I know that things will not always work out as I hope. This isn’t easy. It can make me hesitate. But, beyond this, I also know that you are working in all things for good. Nothing stymies you, Lord. Nothing is beyond your ability to redeem. So, help me to be bold in following you, confident in your goodness, wisdom, and grace. Amen.


Part 45: Where Did Jesus Get His Shocking Vision?

Scripture – Luke 9:21-22 (NRSV)

He sternly ordered and commanded them not to tell anyone, saying, “The Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.”

Focus

Jesus’s vision of his messianic work was truly radical, truly shocking. Rather than be victorious over Rome, he would die on a Roman cross. Where did Jesus get this vision? We don’t know all of the answers, but we do know that he brought together Old Testament prophecies pertaining to the Messiah, the Son of Man, and the Suffering Servant of God. Similarly, we will discern God’s calling in our life by letting the Scripture form our minds and hearts.

Devotion

In yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion I suggested that what Jesus said in Luke 9:22 would have been utterly shocking to his disciples. They began to see him as the long-awaited Messiah, but imagined this role to involve military expertise and political dominance. The last thing in the world they would have expected was for Jesus, as God’s Messiah, to suffer and die.

As you consider this shocking passage from Luke, you may wonder, “Where did Jesus get this shocking vision? How did Jesus come to see his messianic mission as leading to suffering, rejection, and death?” The Gospel of Luke and the other biblical gospels don’t give us all that we would like to know in order to answer these questions. We are not told, for example, when Jesus first began to see his messianic calling as requiring his death. Luke 9:22 gives us Jesus’s first prediction of his death, but not the process by which he came to believe this.

What we can know with quite a bit of certainty is that somehow Jesus combined elements of the Old Testament in a radically new way. He took prophecies of the Messiah (such as Isaiah 61:1-4; see Luke 4:16-21), combining them with prophecies of the Son of Man (for example, Daniel 7:13-14), and then added something astonishingly creative. This astonishing piece came from the prophecies of Isaiah, especially in chapters 52 and 53. There, Isaiah prophesied about the Suffering Servant of God who “was despised and rejected by others; a man of suffering and acquainted with infirmity” (53:3). God’s Servant “was wounded for our transgression, crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the punishment that made us whole” (Isaiah 53:5). He “made his grave with the wicked, and his tomb with the rich, although he had done no violence” (Isaiah 53:9). God says through Isaiah, “The righteous one, my servant, shall make many righteous, and he shall bear their iniquities” (53:11). The Suffering Servant “poured out himself to death, and was numbered with the transgressors; yet he bore the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors” (Isaiah 53:12).

Where did Jesus get the idea that his messianic mission required his death? From his unique combination of Old Testament prophecies about the Messiah, the Son of Man, and the Suffering Servant of God. We can see this from many passages in the Gospels, including Luke 9:22, where Jesus said that he, as the Son of Man, “must undergo great suffering . . . be rejected . . . and be killed.” Similarly, in Mark 10:45 Jesus said that “the Son of Man came not to be served but to serve, and to give his life a ransom for many.” Like the Servant of God in Isaiah, the Son of Man dies for the sake of others, so they might live and be made whole.

In saying that Jesus came to understand his messianic mission by combining different Old Testament prophecies, I’m not suggesting that he sat down in a Galilean library with prophetic scrolls and wrote a term paper on “My Unexpected Identity.” I imagine, rather, that Jesus came to understand his calling through his intimate relationship with his Heavenly Father, a relationship that was shaped by Jesus’s participation in his local synagogue, where, throughout his life, he would have heard biblical prophecies read and reflected upon.

Though Jesus’s experience was unique in many ways, I believe that we clarify our callings in a similar way. We come to understand what God calls us to in life as we reflect deeply on the Scriptures. Like Jesus, we do this as part of the community of God’s people, joining with others for worship, Bible reading, prayer, conversation, service, doing justice, loving mercy, and walking humbly with God. Sometimes God surprises us with a clear and dramatic revelation of his will for our lives (like Moses or Paul). More often, however, we come to understand God’s will as we are shaped by spiritual disciplines that form our souls and as we participate in fellowship with Jesus and his people.

P.S. from Mark – I realize I’ve packed a lot into this relatively short devotion. If you’d like to dig more deeply into the questions I’m working on here, you might find helpful an article I’ve written called, “The Death of Jesus: Why Was It Necessary?” Or, if you prefer, you might like to read my book, Jesus Revealed, which examines in depth the different roles of Jesus, relating them to our lives today.

Reflect

How have you come to understand God’s calling in your life?

What passages of Scripture have been particularly important to you as you figure out who you are and to what God is calling you?

Can you think of a time in your life when your participation in Christian community has helped you to clarify God’s guidance for your life?

Act

Make a list of the passages from Scripture that have been most influential in your life. Offer thanks to God for how he has spoken to you through these passages. Ask in prayer if there is more God wants to say to you through them.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I wish I knew more about your earthly life, what you experienced, thought, and felt. Someday I hope I can learn from you how you came to know what your messianic role would be.

In the meanwhile, Lord, thank you for giving me some of the resources that were helpful to you. Thank you for the Scriptures. Thank you for the community of your people. Thank you for the privilege of prayer.

Help me, Lord, to be open to you when it comes to your calling in my life. Help me to hear you speak through Scripture, through my sisters and brothers, through the inner voice of your Spirit. May I walk faithfully in the calling you have for me. Amen.


Part 46: Do You Want to Be the Richest Person in the World?

Scripture – Luke 9:24-25 (NRSV)

For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it. What does it profit them if they gain the whole world, but lose or forfeit themselves?

Focus

According to recent news reports, Elon Musk is now the richest person in the world. But he seems strangely unimpressed. In fact, he’s spending half of his fortune building a city on Mars, just in case the world is destroyed. Jesus warns us about caring so much for this world that we lose ourselves in the process. Instead, we are to give ourselves to Jesus – all that we are – so that we might receive the riches of his grace and fulness of his life.

Devotion

A recent headline caught my attention: “Elon Musk becomes world’s richest person as wealth tops $185bn.” And just when I had gotten used to thinking of Jeff Bezos as the world’s richest person! As it turns out, Tesla stock value has increased dramatically in recent days, propelling Musk (founder of Tesla) ahead of Bezos (founder of Amazon). I was rather amused, maybe even impressed by Musk’s response to the news of his material prominence. When Twitter announced that Musk was now the world’s wealthiest person, he tweeted, “How strange.” Followed by, “Well, back to work . . . .”

Elon Musk is an unsual person, to say the least. Though he is wealthy beyond what any of us might imagine, he is curiously uninterested in “gaining the whole world.” In fact, he is not sure the world is going to be around for much longer. Musk is spending half of his fortune to establishing “a self-sustaining city on Mars to ensure the continuation of life (of all species) in case Earth gets hit by a meteor like the dinosaurs or WW3 happens and we destroy ourselves.”

Ironically, both Elon Musk and Jesus are less than enthusiastic about “gaining the whole world,” though in different ways. For Musk, the problem lies in the fact that the world might be destroyed someday. For Jesus, the problem with gaining the whole world is what you give up in return. Jesus said, “For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it. What does it profit them if they gain the whole world, but lose or forfeit themselves?” (Luke 9:24-25). If we seek only for success in this world, if we desire only to save and enrich our earthly life, then we will lose our life. Even if we remain physically alive, we will lose our inner life, our eternal life.

What ought we to strive for if not for earthy life and financial gain? Jesus said those who want to follow him should “deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me” (Luke 9:23). He suggested that we must not be “ashamed” of him and his words (Luke 9:26). Rather than seeking our own benefit, we should seek instead to give our whole life to following Jesus, to being devoted to him and his teachings.

Elsewhere, Jesus urged us to “strive first for the kingdom of God and his righteousness” (Matthew 6:33). The top priority of our life should be to live intentionally each day with God as the ruler of our lives. We should seek God’s ways in all that we do, offering all we are to God and his purposes. Yes, in a sense we are giving up our lives to Jesus. But, in the process, we are receiving his life in return, abundant life, life as God intended it to be, both in this age and in the age to come.

When that happens, we become immeasurably rich, not in dollars, but in God. We have confident hope in “the riches of [God’s] glorious inheritance among the saints” (Ephesians 1:18). Though we begin to experience God’s grace right now, we look forward to the time when God will “show the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness to us in Christ Jesus.” Elon Musk is worth only $185 billion these days. Nobody can even measure just how rich you are in Jesus Christ.

Reflect

What do you want most out of life? What are your greatest longings? hopes? Desires?

You may not want the whole world, but are there things you desire that might keep you from seeking first God’s kingdom?

In what ways have you “lost your life” for the sake of following Jesus?

How do you experience the life of Jesus today?

Act

Are there things in your life that you need to surrender to the Lord? Take some time to reflect on this. If you realize you’re holding on to some things too tightly, choose to give them to Jesus. Offer him all that you are.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I don’t want to gain anything and, in the process, lose myself. Yet, I know there are things I desire, even crave. Not wealth, though I do want to have enough to be comfortable. My longings are for things like family love, security, safety, health, meaningful work, the chance to use my gifts in service to others. None of these are bad, of course. But they can take precedence over you, Lord. Forgive me when this happens.

Help me to have things in the right order, to live with the right priorities. May I seek you and the life you offer more than anything else. May I hold loosely other things, even those I value. May I be willing to give to you all that I am, day after day, moment by moment. Help me to live under your kingdom, for your purposes and glory . . . even now. Amen.


Part 47: Did Jesus Get It Wrong?

Scripture – Luke 9:26-27 (NRSV)

Those who are ashamed of me and of my words, of them the Son of Man will be ashamed when he comes in his glory and the glory of the Father and of the holy angels.  But truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the kingdom of God.

Focus

In Luke 9:27 Jesus said that some of those standing with him would see the kingdom of God before they died. Some people believe Jesus was simply mistaken when he said this. But they fail to realize that the kingdom of God is not only something coming gloriously in the future. It is also the reign of God present on earth in the ministry of Jesus, in his death and resurrection, and in our lives as we live under God’s authority and for God’s purposes. We can see the kingdom of God right now, even as we look forward to seeing the glorious kingdom in the future.

Devotion

In today’s passage from Luke, Jesus speaks of the coming of the Son of Man in glory (Luke 9:26). Then he adds, “But truly I tell you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the kingdom of God” (Luke 9:27). This is a peculiar saying of Jesus, to say the least. It seems to assert that his glorious coming, what Christians refer to as the second coming of Christ, would be something that some of those who were with him at that time would see with their own eyes before they died. This wouldn’t be a problem except for the fact that we’re still awaiting the glorious second coming of Christ, and all of those who were with Jesus in this scene from Luke 9 died almost two millennia ago.

I remember worrying about this saying of Jesus when I was in high school while making my first attempt to read through the whole New Testament. My theology said Jesus wouldn’t have been mistaken in what he said, but I could not figure out how else to make sense of that episode in the gospels. Then I got to college and took a Bible class. There I learned that some scholars solved the riddle of Jesus’s curious statement by claiming that he did in fact believe his second coming was imminent. In this belief, they argued, Jesus was just plain wrong. He didn’t understand God’s timetable for his future. This was presented in class as if it were the only reasonable explanation for Luke 9:27.

That was deeply concerning to me. It didn’t fit my view of Jesus’s nature as one who was both fully God and fully human. Nor did it support my belief that Jesus always spoke the truth. Yet, what I was reading for my class seemed on the surface to be right.

Back in 1976, when I was struggling with the content of my Bible class, I started doing research into how people understood the perplexing claim of Jesus that some of those standing with him would not taste death before they saw the kingdom of God. I learned that there was no scholarly consensus about how to understand what Jesus had said. What I learned in class was one of many possible explanations. Other options included: the kingdom of God was revealed in the death and resurrection of Jesus; the kingdom of God was present in the ministry of Jesus; a preliminary glimpse of the kingdom of God would be seen in the next story in Luke, the so-called Transfiguration.

Today, 45 years later, I’m not distressed by Jesus’s statement in Luke 9:27. I have not decided which explanation is the best. I’m quite sure Jesus was not mistaken in what he said, however. For him, the kingdom of God was not only something coming gloriously in the future. It was also something present in his messianic ministry (see Luke 17:21, for example). Plus it would be seen, paradoxically, in his death on the cross, followed by his resurrection (see John 12:23ff). And, as many scholars have claimed, some of those with Jesus as he spoke were also there when he was transfigured. The transfiguration revealed for a moment the future glory of Jesus and the kingdom of God (see Luke 9:28-36).

The main point I wish to make here, aside from the fact that Jesus was not mistaken, is that the kingdom of God is not one simple thing. Yes, it is God’s reign, sovereignty, and power. But the reign of God is both present and future. It is revealed through the death and resurrection of Jesus, which leads to the defeat of sin, death, and Satan. The kingdom of God is something we look forward to in the future, and it is something we can experience each day as we live with God as our king, or, as we often say, with Jesus as our Lord.

P.S. – If you want to learn more about Jesus’s understanding of the kingdom of God, you might want to read an article I wrote: “Jesus and the Kingdom of God: What You Need to Know.”

Reflect

When you come across a passage of Scripture that is worrisome to you, what do you do?

If Jesus was fully human in addition to being fully God, do you think he ever could have been mistaken about anything?

When have you experienced God’s power and reign in a particularly powerful way in your life?

Are you willing to live with God as the King of your entire life? What encourages you to say “yes”? What holds you back?

Act

Talk with your small group or with a wise friend about Luke 9:23-27, one of the most challenging and perplexing passages in the Gospel of Luke.

Pray

Lord Jesus, you taught us to pray, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven.” And so I pray today.

Let your kingdom come, God, and your will be done in my life, in my work and family, in my friendships and professional relationships, in my thinking and feeling, in my finances and volunteering. In all that I do, may you be sovereign.

Let your kingdom come, God, and your will be done in my church, as we seek to worship you in all we do. Let your kingdom come as we reach out to the world with your gospel and your justice.

Let your kingdom come, God, and your will be done in our hurting, broken, angry world. May all authorities in this world acknowledge you and the one true King, seeking to obey and honor you in all things.

Let your kingdom come, God, and your will be done in the future, when you reveal the full glory of the Son of Man. Bring all things together in Christ, making the whole creation what you intended it to be from the beginning.

For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory, forever and ever. Amen.


Part 48: A Glimpse of Glory

Scripture – Luke 9:28-31 (NRSV)

Now about eight days after these sayings Jesus took with him Peter and John and James, and went up on the mountain to pray.  And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly they saw two men, Moses and Elijah, talking to him. They appeared in glory and were speaking of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem.

Focus

The disciples of Jesus were able to catch a glimpse of his heavenly glory. You and I probably won’t get to see this with our physical eyes, but we are able to perceive God’s glory in nature, in loving community, in acts of forgiveness, justice, and mercy. But, the most amazing thing of all is that God, through the Spirit, is transforming us right now into the image of Christ’s own glory. What a wonder!

Devotion

When I’m on vacation, I love to get up early, while it’s still dark. My goal is to be able to sit in some naturally beautiful place and watch the sunrise. I love catching a glimpse of the sun as it just begins to peek above the horizon. (Today’s photo is from a trip my family and I took to Central California.)

A sunrise over the California countryside

Sunrise in Templeton, California. Photo copyright of Mark Roberts.

There’s something about that first glimpse of the sun that I find deeply moving. My feelings have to do with the quietness of the morning, the freshness of the air, the distinctive quality of the light. But seeing the sun in that way as it glows in the distance stirs my soul.

I wonder if that’s how Peter, John, and James felt when they witnessed the so-called “transfiguration” of Jesus. They had gone out to a mountain at Jesus’s invitation, presumably to join him in prayer. This happened sometime during the night or early morning, since Luke mentions that the disciples were “weighed down with sleep” (9:32). While Jesus was praying, all of a sudden “the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white” (Luke 9:29). Then, he was joined by Moses and Elijah, who “appeared in glory” (Luke 9:31). Peter, shaken out of his sleepy stupor, offered to build some shelters for the three glowing men (Luke 9:33). (Parenthetically, I love this response of Peter. It’s so sweet and candid, showing both care and confusion.) But Peter’s offer was interrupted by a voice from heaven saying, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!” (Luke 9:35). When the voice stopped speaking, everything returned to normal.

Don’t you wish you could have been there on that mountain? Wouldn’t it have been amazing to catch a glimpse of Jesus’s heavenly glory? I’m not sure my response would have been any better than Peter’s, mind you. But I would have been moved by what I was seeing even more than when I witness a vacation sunrise.

It’s unlikely that you and I will ever see Jesus in his glowing glory this side of the age to come. But God does bless us with glimpses of his glory at times. Yes, we can see divine glory in the natural beauty of God’s creation. We get a peek of God’s glory when the people of God are united in worship and loving service. We see the glory of God most clearly and profoundly in Jesus, who, according to the Gospel of John, is the very Word of God Incarnate. “And we have seen his glory,” John writes, “the glory as of a father’s only son, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14).

But if you really want to be astounded by God’s glory, look at what Paul wrote to the Corinthians: “And all of us, with unveiled faces, seeing the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror, are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another; for this comes from the Lord, the Spirit” (2 Corinthians 3:18). To me, this is one of the most astounding and wondrous verses in all of Scripture. It says that we, yes “all of us,” including you and I, can see “the glory of the Lord as though reflected in a mirror.” What? A mirror? Surely it can’t be a mirror facing us because that would mean we are reflecting the very glory of God. But that’s exactly what Paul means. We learn this in the next phrase. As we see God’s glory in a mirror, we “are being transformed into the same image from one degree of glory to another.” Not “we will one day be transformed,” but we “are being transformed” now, in the present.

Right now, through the Spirit, God is at work in us, changing us into the glorious image of Christ. When you choose to love in a costly way, when you seek God’s kingdom rather than your own success, when you forgive one who has wronged you, when you offer your whole life to God in worship, then you catch a glimpse of God’s glory, not out there on the horizon or out there in the future, but right where you are, right now, in you. What a wonder!

Reflect

What are some of the most glorious things you have ever seen with your eyes?

When in your life have you had a sense of God’s glory?

How do you respond to the idea that God is transforming you into the glorious image of Christ?

Act

With a wise friend or with your small group, talk about your experiences of God’s glory.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I wish I could have been there with Peter, John, and James as you were transfigured. It would have been amazing to catch a glimpse of your glory.

Thank you for the hints I get of your glory in this life: the splendor of a sunrise, the loveliness of sacrificial service, the elegance of your people gathered in worship. And thank you for the wondrous truth that you are changing me into the image of your glory even now, through your Spirit.

O Lord, may it happen more and more as I offer all that I am to you. Amen.


Part 49: And Then, Back to Reality

Scripture – Luke 9:37-41 (NRSV)

On the next day, when they had come down from the mountain, a great crowd met him. Just then a man from the crowd shouted, “Teacher, I beg you to look at my son; he is my only child. Suddenly a spirit seizes him, and all at once he shrieks. It convulses him until he foams at the mouth; it mauls him and will scarcely leave him. I begged your disciples to cast it out, but they could not.” Jesus answered, “You faithless and perverse generation, how much longer must I be with you and bear with you? Bring your son here.”

Focus

Jesus experienced the challenges and frustrations of human life. How good it is to know that Jesus understands when we’re in a tough place. He has been through things like this. He is with us in all times and all experiences! If you’re confronting the tough reality of life today, whether in your work or in your relationships, in your neighborhood or in the wider world, remember, Jesus understands. He is with you!

Devotion

Have you ever had the experience of getting away from normal life, enjoying a rejuvenating time of rest, reflection, and recreation, only to have your restoration crushed by the reality of ordinary life? I’ll bet you have. I know I have.

Hawaii vacation photo copyright of Mark Roberts.

I think, for example, of a time when my wife and I were vacationing in Hawaii (from which comes today’s photo). Dear friends had given this trip to us and it was delightful in every way. Delightful, that is, until near the end of the trip, I thought I would “just check” my email. What did I find in my inbox? A dozen panicky and alarming emails from colleagues who begged me to interrupt my vacation and confront a volatile crisis at work. One moment I was basking peacefully in the warmth of the Hawaiian sun. The next moment I was dragged back into the painful reality of my workplace.

Sound familiar?

It would have been familiar to Jesus; the “back to reality” part that is, not the email in Hawaii part. In yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion we observed the wonder of the transfiguration, when Jesus was revealed in his heavenly glory and a voice from heaven declared him to be “my Son, my Chosen” (Luke 9:35). It’s hard to imagine a more uplifting and affirming experience than this. I expect that Jesus came down from the mountain on which he was transfigured both moved and encouraged.

Then, on the very next day, Jesus was thrust back into reality. As a crowd gathered around him, a man shouted out to Jesus, explaining that his child was tormented by a demon and that Jesus’s disciples were not able to cast it out of the boy. You may recall that, earlier in Luke, Jesus had given his disciples “power and authority over all demons” (Luke 9:1). They should have been able to expel the demon that harassed the man’s son, but for some reason were not able to do so.

Jesus responded to what he heard with an understandable lament: “You faithless and perverse generation, how much longer must I be with you and bear with you?” (9:41). Though this remark had wide applicability, it seems directed first of all at Jesus’s disciples. It was a messianic way of saying what aggravated parents sometimes say to their unruly children, “How long am I going to have to put up with you?” I expect Jesus was thinking something like, “I gave you the authority to cast out demons. You could have handled this. Why didn’t you?” He was clearly feeling frustrated. I imagine that his frustration may have been more acute because of what he had just experienced on the mountaintop. He went from divine glory to the reality of demonic bondage and human unfaithfulness (see Matthew 17:20).

You and I won’t have an experience quite like that of Jesus because we aren’t eligible to be transfigured as he was. We are fully human but not fully divine. Nevertheless, we do know what it’s like to go from highs to lows, from mountaintops to valleys, from joys to sorrows. How good it is to know that Jesus understands, that he has been through things like this, and that he is with us in all times and all experiences! If you’re confronting the tough reality of life today, whether in your work or in your relationships, in your neighborhood or in the wider world, remember, Jesus understands. Jesus is with you!

Reflect

Can you remember a time in your life when you went from the mountaintop to the valley in terms of your experience and emotions? What happened?

As you reflect on the fact that Jesus experienced “lows” in his life and work, how does this impact you?

Act

Take some time to put yourself into the story in Luke 9. Imagine what it was like to be the desperate father . . . and the crowd . . . and the disciples . . . and Jesus.

Pray

Lord Jesus, it is striking to me that you went from the mountain to the valley, from the transfiguration to the reality of demonic bondage and human unfaithfulness. Thank you for entering into our reality, with its pains and frustrations. Thank you for being one of us, fully human even as you are also fully divine.

Lord, when I got through the ups and downs of life, when reality sometimes feels terribly distressing, help me to turn to you, to share my heart with you, to know that you are with me, that you understand. May I draw near to you because you have drawn near to me. Amen.


Part 50: Jesus Shares Our Sorrows . . . and More

Scripture – Luke 9:37-41 (NRSV)

On the next day, when they had come down from the mountain, a great crowd met him. Just then a man from the crowd shouted, “Teacher, I beg you to look at my son; he is my only child. Suddenly a spirit seizes him, and all at once he shrieks. It convulses him until he foams at the mouth; it mauls him and will scarcely leave him. I begged your disciples to cast it out, but they could not.” Jesus answered, “You faithless and perverse generation, how much longer must I be with you and bear with you? Bring your son here.”

Focus

Jesus is with us in good times and bad times, when we’re rejoicing and when we’re sad. Jesus understands because he was fully human in addition to being fully God. The divine Son became human, not only that he might empathize with our sorrows, but also so that he might save us from sin, suffering, and death. When we struggle, when we hurt, when we feel afraid, Jesus is with us to comfort us, strengthen us, and to save us.

Devotion

In yesterday’s Life for Leaders devotion I began reflecting on a scene from Luke 9. I’d like to consider this scene a bit more today. Jesus had recently come down from the mountain where he had been transfigured, revealing his heavenly glory and receiving strong verbal affirmation from his Heavenly Father. But then he confronted the annoying reality of demonic bondage and human unfaithfulness. In frustration he said, “You faithless and perverse generation, how much longer must I be with you and bear with you? Bring your son here” (Luke 9:41). Notice that Jesus didn’t let his frustration keep him from rebuking the unclean spirit and healing the boy, giving him back to his father whole. Feeling frustrated is not a sin, though it can lead to sin. This was not the case for Jesus, who acted in loving compassion for the father and his son.

Photo copyright of Mark Roberts.

I find this story strangely comforting, in that I have often felt something like Jesus must have felt. Many times in my professional life, for example, a sublime experience of God’s presence was followed by something painfully down to earth. I remember, for example, one Christmas when I was pastor of Irvine Presbyterian Church. Our Christmas Eve services that year were especially glorious. (Today’s photo shows one of our Christmas Eve services.) We were in our new sanctuary, which was both visually stunning and wonderfully supportive of choral and congregational singing. I was struck more than ever by the reality of Christ’s birth as we sang “Joy to the World.”

Then, the day after Christmas, a different kind of reality hit me like a ton of bricks. A dear woman from my church called me at home. “Mark,” she said, “my husband died today.” I was dumbfounded. At first I didn’t even know what to say. Partly, I was exhausted from four Christmas Eve services. Partly, I couldn’t imagine that this woman’s husband, a young, healthy man, was dead. When I finally found my words, I shared my shock and sadness. When I asked the woman what had happened, she explained that her husband had become ill with the flu a few days before Christmas. Then on December 26th his fever spiked, and before she was able to get him to the hospital, he died. My grief for this woman, whose wedding I had performed only a couple of years earlier, was profound. My Christmas reverie was devastated by the reality of death, loss, and sadness. Of course, what this woman experienced was far more terrible and tragic.

I find it comforting that Jesus knows what it’s like to go from heavenly glory to earthly pain and frustration. It makes such a difference that Jesus “will all our sorrows share,” in the phrasing of the hymn “What a Friend We Have in Jesus.” But, even more astoundingly, Jesus chose to live with us, in our pain, loss, confusion, and limitations. Philippians 2:6-8 reminds us that Christ surrendered his divine privilege in order to become human, humbling himself even to the point of death. Though he still participated in divine reality, he chose to live in the messiness and suffering of fallen human life. Jesus joined our reality so that we might join his reality. Or, as it says in 2 Corinthians 5:21, “For our sake [God] made [Christ] to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” How amazing!

If you’re on a mountaintop today, celebrating God’s blessings in your life, Jesus is with you. And if you’re in the darkest valley, confronting the harsh reality of human life, Jesus is with you. Not only does he understand, but also he took on this reality so he might set us free from bondage to sin, suffering, and death. No matter what you’re facing today, let me urge you to take this good news to heart.

Reflect

Can you remember a time when you were facing something very difficult and you sensed God’s presence with you? What happened? What helped you to know that God was there with you?

Are you dealing with something right now that is distressing and/or painful? Given the impact of the pandemic on our lives, it’s likely that you are, at least in some way. Do you sense the presence of Jesus with you now? If not, are you willing to ask him to make himself known to you in this time?

Act

Take some time to think or to write in your journal about how you experience the presence of Jesus in your life.

Pray

What a friend we have in Jesus,
all our sins and griefs to bear!
What a privilege to carry
everything to God in prayer!
O what peace we often forfeit,
O what needless pain we bear,
all because we do not carry
everything to God in prayer!

Have we trials and temptations?
Is there trouble anywhere?
We should never be discouraged;
take it to the Lord in prayer!
Can we find a friend so faithful
who will all our sorrows share?
Jesus knows our every weakness;
take it to the Lord in prayer!

Are we weak and heavy laden,
cumbered with a load of care?
Precious Savior, still our refuge—
take it to the Lord in prayer!
Do your friends despise, forsake you?
Take it to the Lord in prayer!
In his arms he’ll take and shield you;
you will find a solace there. Amen.

“What a Friend We Have in Jesus” by Joseph Scriven. Public domain.


Part 51: Do You Want to Be Great?

Scripture – Luke 9:46-48 (NRSV)

An argument arose among them as to which one of them was the greatest. But Jesus, aware of their inner thoughts, took a little child and put it by his side, and said to them, “Whoever welcomes this child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me; for the least among all of you is the greatest.”

Focus

Do you want to be great? If so, Jesus would urge you not to seek your own greatness, but rather choose the way of humility, service, and dependence on God. Value those in this world who are considered the “least.” Don’t be preoccupied by your own accomplishments. Rather, focus on serving others, knowing that as you do, you are serving Jesus.

Devotion

As I read this story from Luke I am transported back to my childhood. When I was in elementary school, my friends and I were obsessed with being the greatest. We didn’t care about being the best in the classroom, mind you. It was all about our awesomeness on the playground. We wanted to be the greatest in athletic feats on asphalt. We argued all the time about who was the greatest in certain sports. In fact, we made lists of our classmates, specifying their particular ranking in the events we valued. I can still remember, for example, that Chester Feenstra was the tops at tetherball. But Ivan Lescano was the king, because he was #1 in both running and kicking. Rob Fawcett came in a close second to Ivan in both categories. Ivan and Rob weren’t big, but they were both super strong and quick. (For the record, I sometimes made a list or two, but was never #1 at anything.)

From my childhood experience, there’s part of me that understands why the disciples were arguing about who was the greatest in Luke 9:46. I get the competitive drive they’re showing. But I’m also embarrassed for the disciples. For one thing, they were not elementary-aged boys, but grown men. They might still have wanted to be the greatest, but you’d think they’d have learned not to admit it so openly. Plus, they were arguing about their personal greatness right at the time when Jesus had begun talking about his coming suffering and death. In fact, right before the disciples were having their “I’m the greatest” argument, Jesus had predicted his betrayal. That’s an awkward juxtaposition if ever there were one.

Jesus did not, however, rebuke the disciples for their egotistical inappropriateness. Rather, he brought a “little child” to his side and said, “Whoever welcomes this child in my name welcomes me, and whoever welcomes me welcomes the one who sent me; for the least among all of you is the greatest” (Luke 9:48). In Jesus’s day, as in ours, if you wanted to be great you didn’t focus your attention on children. Children, after all, were humble, small, unaccomplished, lacking power and reputation. They were the “least” in their culture. So, by saying that one who welcomes a child welcomes him, Jesus was calling his disciples to a radically different value system.

Then Jesus added, “for the least among all of you is the greatest” (Luke 9:48). The kingdom of God turns everything upside down. It calls us to see differently, to evaluate differently, to live differently. What matters in God’s kingdom isn’t human accomplishment and grandeur, but humility and dependence on God. Those who are truly great acknowledge their weakness and need for God. They seek to lift up others, not themselves. They would not even be interested in arguing for their own greatness, though they might acknowledge the greatness of others. By the way, our translation misses something notable in this verse. Though the disciples were arguing about which of them was the “greatest” (meizon in Greek), Jesus actually said that the least is “great” (megas in Greek) not “the greatest.” Greatness is something we share in God’s kingdom.

So, how can you and I be great in the way of Jesus? We can’t become actual children again. And Jesus doesn’t mean we should act in a childish manner. Nor is he expecting us to quit our jobs and stop being responsible for family and friends. Rather, you and I can stop fighting to be seen as the greatest. We can resist the urge to promote ourselves. We can choose a different way, the way of humility, servanthood, and dependence upon God. If we are honored, we won’t let it puff us up. Instead, in our hearts and in our actions we will pass the honor on to others, and most of all, to God.

Can we do this if we’re persons of authority? What if we’re supposed to lead others? How can we be the least as leaders? An answer comes from Jim Collins in his groundbreaking book, Good to Great. Collins shows that the greatest companies are led by what he calls “Level 5 Leaders.” These leaders are, according to Collins, “a study in duality: modest and willful, humble and fearless.” Concerning themselves they are modest and humble. But concerning the organization they lead and its mission that are willful and fearless. They exercise their “leastness” in service to others, seeking the greatness of their colleagues and their organization rather than their own greatness.

Reflect

Have you ever wanted to be great in some way? Even the greatest? What was this about? Why did you feel this way?

How do you respond to today’s story from Luke? Can you relate at all to the disciples?

How does the saying of Jesus strike you? How might you welcome Jesus?

What might it mean for you to be the “least” in the various contexts of your life?

Act

After considering it prayerfully, choose to serve someone in your life who is not a person of power or status. Show tangible care to someone who might be considered “the least” in your world.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I’m thankful today for this realistic portrayal of the disciples. I’m so glad Luke and the other gospel writers didn’t “clean things up.” We can learn so much from the disciples, from their exemplary faith (at times) and their exemplary foolishness (at other times).

Help me, Lord, to think differently about the people in my world. In particular, may I learn to welcome children and others of low status. May I give myself away in service to “the least” in my culture, organization, neighborhood, and church.

Set me free from being preoccupied with my own greatness. May I choose instead to seek your greatness, to lift up those around me, to walk genuinely on the path of humility. May I always remember, Lord, how much I depend on you.

All praise and honor be to you! Amen.


Part 52: Have You Set Your Face?

Scripture – Luke 9:51 (NRSV)

When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem.

Focus

In Luke 9, Jesus “set his face” to go to Jerusalem. That wasn’t just a physical destination, however. Jesus had a clear, guiding sense of purpose. When he “set his face” he chose definitively to go to the place where he would suffer and die. Jesus lived with purpose. Do you?

Devotion

As I was reading along in Luke 9, a phrase in verse 51 grabbed my attention. It was not the phrase “to be taken up,” though this is a curious way to refer to what would happen in the last days of Jesus’s life on earth, including his ascension. The phrase that stood out to me was “he set his face to go to Jerusalem.”

This expression in the Greek original of Luke represents a Hebrew idiom that literally meant “to position one’s face in a certain way.” That saying had a literal, directional sense, as in Genesis 31:21, where it says that Jacob “set his face toward the hill country of Gilead” because that was his destination. But this expression also conveyed a sense of purpose or resolve. Jacob was not just traveling accidentally in the direction of Gilead. He was going there intentionally and with purpose.

Thus, in Luke 9:51, we learn that Jesus was heading to Jerusalem. Though he had focused his messianic work in Galilee for a season, the time had come for him to minister in Jerusalem But, as in the case of Jacob in Genesis 31, Jesus was not merely heading in the direction of Jerusalem. Rather, he was going there quite intentionally in order to preach the good news of the kingdom of God in that center of Jewish cultural and religious life. Moreover, Jesus knew that in Jerusalem he would “undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised” (Luke 9:22). His prophetic vision was matched by a deep sense of purpose. He knew that he must undergo what would happen to him in Jerusalem. It was an essential element of his messianic work. So, as we read in The Message version of Luke 9:51, Jesus “gathered up his courage and steeled himself for the journey to Jerusalem.”

The question I want to ask you is this: Have you set your face? Do you have a strong sense of direction, not so much for your travel as for your life? Is your life guided by a deep, abiding purpose that motivates you and sustains you?

My friend and De Pree Center colleague Tod Bolsinger has recently published a book called Tempered Resilience. Though he does not use the phrase “set one’s face,” Tod frequently mentions the critical importance of purpose for leaders who seek to be resilient. For example, he explains that “the sense of calling or purpose is critical to leadership resilience in both Christian formation and organizational leadership literature.” Yet it’s not just any purpose that matters. “Christian leadership that flows from the center of our being,” Tod writes, “must begin in aligning our motivations with the purposes of God.” This is true, not just for acknowledged leaders, but for all Christians. “To be a Christian,” according to Tod, “is to be personally engaged in and have as one’s life purpose the mission of Jesus Christ.”

As we “set our face” in the direction of Christ’s mission, our particular paths will be distinctive. Some of us, like me, for example, will exercise our purpose as pastors and parents. Others will live with purpose as inventors, painters, technology specialists, managers, entrepreneurs, teachers, carpenters, grandparents, Sunday school teachers, and the list goes on. No matter what we do each day, no matter our particular callings, we are all called to the mission of Jesus Christ. May God give us the grace to “set our face” in this direction.

Reflect

Would you say that you have indeed “set your face” in a particular direction for your life? Do you have a clear sense of purpose for living?

If so, how does your purpose inform your daily work? Your relationships? Your dreams for the future? Your use of money? Your civic life?

If you do not have a strong sense of purpose for your life, are you willing to ask God to help you develop one?

Act

Set aside some time for reflection. See if you can write down in relatively few words your basic sense of purpose. You may find it helpful to do this with your small group or with a close friend.

Pray

Lord Jesus, today I’m struck by how you “set your face” to go to Jerusalem. Yes, that was your physical destination. But it was so much more. You were going to Jerusalem because you knew your ultimate purpose. You knew it was necessary for you to suffer and be crucified. Thank you, Lord, for living in light of this purpose.

Help me, I pray, to “set my face” in the direction of your mission. May my life be shaped and guided by your priorities, your vision, your truth, your love. Help me to live under your kingdom in every part of life, whether I’m at work or home, at church or in my neighborhood, in the grocery store or the polling place. Amen.


Part 53: An Awkward and Teachable Moment

Scripture – Luke 22:24-27 (NRSV)

A dispute also arose among them as to which one of them was to be regarded as the greatest. But he said to them, “The kings of the Gentiles lord it over them; and those in authority over them are called benefactors. But not so with you; rather the greatest among you must become like the youngest, and the leader like one who serves. For who is greater, the one who is at the table or the one who serves? Is it not the one at the table? But I am among you as one who serves.”

Focus

The Gospel of Luke captures an awkward moment for Jesus and his disciples. Right after he speaks of his pending betrayal and death, they launch into an argument about which one of them is the greatest. Yet Jesus was not silenced by their inappropriateness. Rather, he seized a teachable moment, calling his disciples to be servants to each other, just as he was being a servant to them. The challenge of Jesus is for us too. Are we willing to be humble servants, just like our Master?

Devotion

During my sophomore year of college, my roommate’s mother died unexpectedly. Though it was several weeks before spring break, Henry knew he had to hurry to Florida to be with his sister and help her make arrangements for their mother’s burial. (Their father had died years before.)

With a heavy heart, Henry packed his bags and headed for the airport. I went along with him for moral support. When we got into the elevator of our dorm, a guy on our hall, Sam, joined us. Seeing Henry’s suitcases he asked curiously, “Where you going, Henry?” Henry answered, “Florida.” “Florida!” Sam exulted. “That’s great. An early spring break. Wow. I wish I was doing that.” When Henry and I didn’t seem to share Sam’s excitement, he looked confused. Finally he asked, “Is something wrong?” So Henry explained the real reason why he was going to Florida. Sam was stunned and embarrassed over his joyful outburst. What an awkward moment!

I’m reminded of this moment when I read Luke 22. This chapter describes what happened during Jesus’s last meal with his disciples. In verses 14-23, Jesus reinterpreted the Passover meal so as to point to his own imminent death. He also mentioned that one who was with him at the table would soon betray him. But then, “A dispute arose among them as to which one of them was the greatest” (Luke 22:24). Now that must have been an awkward moment, at least for Jesus. He was preparing to die a painful death while his disciples were arguing over their own greatness. Ouch!

Jesus, however, didn’t get stuck by the awkwardness of what his disciples had said. Rather, he saw a teachable moment, a time to help his followers understand both his calling and their calling. Jesus began by noting that Gentile rulers revel in their power and reputation (Luke 22:25). “But not so with you;” he said, “rather the greatest among you must become like the youngest, and the leader like one who serves.” Then he pointed to his own example. “I am among you as one who serves” (Luke 22:27). Thus, the disciples of Jesus should not seek their own greatness and glory. Rather, like their Lord, they should serve others humbly, even sacrificially.

You and I may not get into arguments about our greatness, but we can be overly concerned about how we look, about what others think of us. We can savor our personal position and authority. Yet, if we seek to follow Jesus, we are called to something completely different. Even if we are leaders, we should serve those whom we lead. We must be willing to humble ourselves as we lead the people entrusted to our care.

Lent is a good time for us to reflect on our true motivations in life. Why are you doing the work you’re doing? To what do you aspire? How much are you in it for your own success? To what extent do the teaching and example of Jesus guide you in your relationships at work, at home, in your neighborhood, or at church? Are you willing to be a servant? Are you seeking to serve others rather than to be served?

Reflect

Can you think of leaders you have known – or known of, at any rate – who act as servants to those they lead?

How is it possible to be a leader and a servant at the same time?

As you reflect on your own work, your own leadership, are there ways in which you are serving others?

Would your colleagues and subordinates think of you as a servant leader? Why or why not?

Act

With a wise friend or your small group, talk about how you and they can live out Jesus’s call to servanthood at work.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for your teaching on leading and serving. Thank you for modeling for us what true leadership – true servanthood – is all about. Thank you for calling us to imitate you in your service to others.

Help me, Lord, to follow you as I serve others. Teach me how to serve even and especially when I am charged to lead. By your Spirit, help me to humble myself even as I am bold for the work of your kingdom. Amen.


Part 54: Jesus Reclaims Our Brokenness

Scripture – Luke 22:31-34 (NRSV)

“Simon, Simon, listen! Satan has demanded to sift all of you like wheat, but I have prayed for you that your own faith may not fail; and you, when once you have turned back, strengthen your brothers.” And he said to him, “Lord, I am ready to go with you to prison and to death!” Jesus said, “I tell you, Peter, the cock will not crow this day, until you have denied three times that you know me.”

Focus

Jesus knew in advance that Peter would deny him and that this would be devastating for Peter’s faith. But Jesus prayed that Peter would turn back. When that happened, Jesus wanted Peter to minister to others. Jesus isn’t looking for perfection. Rather, he’s in the reclamation business. Jesus takes our failures and losses and uses them, reclaiming them for good. He uses us in our brokenness to bring his love and grace to others.

Devotion

During my lifetime, reclamation of used materials has gone from rare to common, from ignored to highly valued. When I was a child, we didn’t reclaim any of our trash unless the school was having a paper drive. As I got older, reclamation centers became popular among those of us who would take our glass, cans, and paper goods so they could be recycled. Nowadays, most of us have dedicated trash cans for items that can be reclaimed and reused, thus helping to protect the natural environment.

Jesus was into reclamation way before it became popular; not reclamation of trash, however, but of broken human lives. We see a moving example of this in Luke 22. As Jesus was talking with his disciples during their last supper together, he spoke directly to Simon Peter in a most striking way. First, he said that Satan has asked to “sift” all of the disciples like wheat (Luke 22:31). Not good news! Then, Jesus addressed Simon Peter, saying, “But I have prayed for you [singular in Greek] that your own faith may not fail; and you, when once you have turned back, strengthen your brothers” (22:32). Simon Peter, picking up on the implication that he would fall prey to Satan’s sifting, swore to stick with Jesus even if that meant prison and death (22:33). Jesus responded by predicting that “Peter” would deny him three times before the next morning came (22:34). Ouch!

I’d like to focus today on what Jesus said to Peter. Jesus knew hard times and temptations were coming for Peter so he prayed specifically for him, that his faith would not fail. Interestingly, Jesus did not pray that temptation would be taken away from Peter. Rather, he asked that Peter’s faith would not disappear in any ultimate sense. It might be tested and battered, but would in the end be sustained.

Then Jesus added an imperative, telling Peter that, “once you have turned back, strengthen your brothers.” I am struck by the “once you have turned back” phrase. Jesus knew that Peter would deny him and that this would rock Peter’s faith. Yet Jesus believed that Peter would, in the end, return to his life of following Jesus. When that happened, Peter should “strengthen” his brothers who were in need of encouragement, teaching, and support.

Jesus gave Peter major authority and responsibility, even though Jesus knew that Peter was about to fail mightily. Or maybe even because Peter was about to fail mightily. When we fail, we have the opportunity to learn and grow. We become more realistic about our weaknesses and recognize our need for God’s strength. Failure can actually help us grow even more than success. Did Jesus know that Peter’s giving in to temptation would lead to deep grief, repentance, and growth for Peter? It seems so. Jesus was not in the “find the perfect human” business. Rather, he was in the human reclamation business. He takes us as we are in all of our brokenness and uses us so that even our failures are reclaimed for his purposes.

I’m reminded of my friend Robert. Robert is a unique craftsman and artist. Among his many talents is the ability to take broken things and turn them into art. Robert always keeps his eyes open for discarded items so he might reclaim them.

“Chairob” by Robert Feuge. Thanks to Robert for permission to use this photo.

One time when we were at Laity Lodge together, Robert was excited about an old, battered, rusty chair that he had found buried in the dirt somewhere. All I could see was one very sad chair. But Robert saw something altogether different. Soon he was working away on this chair, adding other things he had found buried. In time, that abandoned chair became a life-affirming sculpture. Robert explained, “‘The Chairob’ was made from things I found buried and given wings to fly. It became a place of rest for living things.”

In the season of Lent, we are particularly aware of our mortality, our sin, our brokenness. But we mustn’t define ourselves in light of these sad realities. Rather, we should delight in the fact that Jesus is in the reclamation business. He takes our brokenness and turns it into something beautiful. He takes our failure and transforms it for good in service to others, just like he did with Peter.

Reflect

How do you think Peter felt when he heard all that Jesus had to say to him in this passage?

Do you ever feel like your brokenness is beyond reclamation by Jesus?

Have you ever experienced Jesus reclaiming your brokenness or failure as you served others for his kingdom?

Act

Laity Lodge has a wonderful six-and-a-half-minute film focusing on Robert Feuge and his unique art. As you reflect on this film, think about how God has been reclaiming your life.

Pray

Lord Jesus, thank you for being in the reclamation business. Thank you for seeing beyond Peter’s failure, seeing his potential to serve others. And thank you for seeing beyond my failures, for seeing my brokenness not as a deal-breaker, but as an opportunity for growth.

Today, Lord, I give you all that I am. I ask you to use me for your kingdom purposes. Reclaim that parts of me that are rusty and battered. Renew and restore me so that I might serve you and serve others in your name. Amen.


Part 55: The Anguish of Jesus

Scripture – Luke 22:39-44 (NRSV)

[Jesus] came out and went, as was his custom, to the Mount of Olives; and the disciples followed him. When he reached the place, he said to them, “Pray that you may not come into the time of trial.” Then he withdrew from them about a stone’s throw, knelt down, and prayed, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me; yet, not my will but yours be done.” [Then an angel from heaven appeared to him and gave him strength. In his anguish he prayed more earnestly, and his sweat became like great drops of blood falling down on the ground.]

Focus

In the Gospel of Luke, when Jesus prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane he experienced extreme anguish. Sometimes Christians are squeamish about seeing Jesus as so very human. But we must hold together our belief in his full humanity and his full deity. The fact that Jesus suffered truly and painfully means that he understands us and our suffering. Our Savior gets us in a deep way. This is good news, indeed.

Devotion

Today we begin a three-part series of devotions focusing on the prayer of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane. Luke doesn’t mention Gethsemane by name, but it was at the base of the Mount of Olives and is named in Matthew and Mark. Luke’s account is also shorter than what is found in those other Gospels, with a notable exception. Luke includes two unique verses, 43 and 44, which describe an angelic visit to Jesus and his extreme anguish as he prayed.

The NRSV translation puts those two verses in brackets because they don’t appear in some of the older manuscripts of Luke. Other translations include the verses with an explanatory footnote. Most scholars of the biblical text agree that these verses were in the original version of Luke but were removed later by some scribes for a theological reason. That reason has to do with the portrayal of Jesus in these verses. In one an angel appeared and “gave him strength” (22:43). The divine Son of God wouldn’t have needed extra strength, so the scribes reasoned. In the next verse Jesus felt so much anguish that his sweat became “like great drops of blood falling down on the ground” (22:44). This seemed to the scribes like too much anguish for the Son of God. So some, but not all, early copyists of Luke did not include verses 43-44, with their very human, very vulnerable Jesus.

When I think of my own Christian journey, I understand their point. As a young boy at camp, I bought a plaque that featured a painting of Jesus in the Garden. I loved that picture of Jesus praying, with his utterly peaceful and glowing face gazing up to heaven. He looked calm, cool, and collected, with no blood-like sweat or need for angelic support. (You can see the painting that was on my plaque with some explanation here.) I found comfort in the thought of a Superman-like Jesus, probably because I loved Superman almost as much as I loved Jesus.

As I grew in my faith, I realized that, like the early scribes, I had so emphasized the deity of Jesus that I had minimized his humanity. My theology started shifting, not away from proclaiming Jesus as “truly God,” but as one who was also “truly human.” In fact, I began to take comfort in the fact that Jesus, being fully human, was able to understand me in ways I had not imagined before. In the words of Hebrews, “For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who in every respect has been tested as we are, yet without sin” (Hebrews 4:15).

When I visited the Garden of Gethsemane ten years ago, I was struck by the quiet calm of the place. I knew that the olive trees in that garden today were, in all likelihood, grown from the roots of the same trees under which Jesus knelt to pray. As I was walking along, I noticed a tiny sculpture embedded in the wall. I couldn’t quite tell what it was until I drew near. It was a carving of Jesus praying in the garden. He didn’t look peaceful or like some kind of superman. No, he was bent over as in agony, face down, pouring out his anguish to his Father. I felt drawn to that image and I still am. I’ll share with you the photo I took that day.

A sculpture of Jesus praying from the wall of the Garden of Gethsemane. © Mark D. Roberts

Whether or not those verses in Luke were in Luke’s original draft, they rightly convey the truth of Jesus’s anguish, and more deeply, the truth of his humanity. Christians have for centuries affirmed the mystery of Jesus’s dual nature, “truly God and truly human.” We need to continue to embrace both because both have deep significance for us.

Today, as is appropriate in the season of Lent, we focus on the humanity of Jesus. Because Jesus was fully human, he felt pain just as we do. Because Jesus was fully human, he understands our weaknesses and sufferings. Because Jesus was fully human, he was able to bear the sin of humanity on the cross. Because Jesus was fully human, he is your Savior and mine. Hallelujah!

Reflect

How have you imagined Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane? Have you also been influenced by traditional paintings of the scene, in which Jesus appears serene, almost above it all?

What difference does it make to you that Jesus felt deep anguish as he prayed?

Do you really believe Jesus “gets” you in a deep way? Why or why not?

Act

I have put up a hi-res version of the photo of Jesus praying on the De Pree website. Let me encourage you to set aside some minutes to reflect on this sculpture. How does it help you to get into the story in Luke 22? How does it help you to know Jesus better?

Pray

Lord Jesus, I have so many thoughts and feelings as I read about your time of prayer in the garden. I can’t even begin to imagine the anguish you felt, knowing what was coming for you. As horrible as that anguish was for you, I’m grateful that you were fully human, so that you could feel pain and suffering. Not that I wish this on you, Lord! But I am so thankful that you know our suffering and pain, my suffering and pain. You understand my weakness, my humanity.

Thank you for knowing me in this way. And thank you for loving me even so. Amen.


Part 56: The Shocking Prayer of Jesus

Scripture – Luke 22:39-42 (NRSV)

Jesus came out and went, as was his custom, to the Mount of Olives; and the disciples followed him. When he reached the place, he said to them, “Pray that you may not come into the time of trial.” Then he withdrew from them about a stone’s throw, knelt down, and prayed, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me; yet, not my will but yours be done.”

Focus

While praying in the Garden on the night before his crucifixion, Jesus made a shocking request to his Heavenly Father. He asked that the Father might “remove this cup from me.” Jesus was asking for a way to avoid the suffering and sacrifice of the cross. His honesty in prayer teaches and inspires us. It gives us the courage to say in prayer what is real in our hearts, without pretense or pretending. You can tell God exactly what you’re thinking and feeling, without holding back.

Devotion

During the evening before he was crucified, Jesus went with his disciples to the Garden of Gethsemane at the foot of the Mount of Olives. There, going on for a short distance alone, he prayed, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me; yet, not my will but yours be done” (Luke 22:42).

Olive trees in the Garden of Gethsemane. Photo used by permission from Mark D. Roberts.

Photo courtesy of Mark D. Roberts. All rights reserved.

The use of “cup” as a metaphor for Jesus’s death is familiar to Christians, especially because of its use in the Lord’s Supper. But we might wonder what Jesus meant when he asked his Heavenly Father to remove the cup from him. Was he saying only “Don’t make me die on the cross” or did he mean something more?

An answer to this question comes from the use of the cup metaphor in the Old Testament. There, the cup stands for that with which our life is filled. Our “cup” can be filled with blessing and salvation (Psalm 23:5; 116:13); or it can be filled with wrath and horror (Isaiah 51:17; Ezekiel 23:33). Frequently the cup stands for God’s judgment and wrath as it comes fully upon people. Consider, for example, Isaiah 51:17:

Rouse yourself, rouse yourself!
Stand up, O Jerusalem,
you who have drunk at the hand of the LORD
the cup of his wrath,
who have drunk to the dregs
the bowl of staggering.

Jerusalem drank the cup of God’s wrath as God’s judgment came upon them. Similarly, through the prophet Ezekiel the Lord speaks of the judgment about to fall upon Jerusalem:

You shall drink your sister’s cup,
deep and wide;
you shall be scorned and derided,
it holds so much.
You shall be filled with drunkenness and sorrow.
A cup of horror and desolation
is the cup of your sister Samaria;
you shall drink it and drain it out,
and gnaw its sherds,
and tear out your breasts (Ezekiel 23:32-34).

Thus when Jesus spoke of drinking the cup, he was alluding to these images from the Scriptures. By going to the cross, he would drink the cup of God’s wrath. He would bear the divine judgment that falls rightly upon Israel, and, indeed upon all humanity.

But, shockingly, Jesus was praying to be released from this responsibility. Though he had predicted his death and its necessity, as it drew near, he yearned for some other way. He hoped that his Father had some other option and he asked for this openly. There may be no more powerful and moving display in the Gospels of Jesus’s humanity. Moreover, for God the Son to endure separation from God the Father must have been horrifying to Jesus beyond anything you and I can imagine.

I’m struck again by Jesus’s utter honesty in this prayer. He could have prayed simply, “Your will be done.” That’s where he ends up in this prayer. But, instead, he asks for what is real within him. He doesn’t hide behind pretense or theological precision. Rather, he tells it like it is.

The example of Jesus encourages us to be fully honest with God when we pray. We don’t have to be afraid of telling God the truth about us. We shouldn’t say all the right things when these things are not a true reflection of what’s in our hearts. The Father of Jesus already knows everything about us. He can handle anything we put before him, anything and everything. He will not be shocked or offended if we ask even to get out of that to which he has called us. In fact, when we tell God the whole truth, then God is able to touch our hearts, addressing our fears and redirecting our desires. God will help us to surrender to his will, confident in his wisdom, love, and all-surpassing goodness.

In this season of Lent, perhaps you can be more honest with God in prayer. It’s a time to let the example of Jesus teach, inspire, and reassure you.

Reflect

Why do you think Jesus asked not to have to drink the cup?

Are you able to be fully honest with God in prayer? If so, why? If not, why not?

What helps you to tell God the whole truth about yourself as you pray?

Act

If you can think of ways in which you have been holding back in prayer, ask the Lord to help you be more honest. Then, tell him exactly what is on your heart, holding nothing back.

Pray

Lord Jesus, as I read Luke’s account of your prayer in the garden, I am deeply moved. I am moved by your pain and your honesty. I am, frankly, stunned that you were able to ask the cup to be removed from you. You held nothing back from your Father in heaven. You spoke what was truly in your heart.

Help me, I pray, to be honest in prayer. Sometimes I just mouth the words without meaning them. Sometimes I feel like I can’t really say what I’m thinking or feeling. I figure you must be tired of hearing the same thing from me again and again. Or I have sins to confess that are just too embarrassing. Or I desire things that I’m not even sure are okay. Or . . . . Lord, I can think of all kinds of reasons not to tell you the truth when I pray.

So, help me. By your Spirit, help me to open my heart to you without reservation. Help me to trust you, to have utter confidence in your love for me. In this season of Lent, may my prayers be more honest than ever as I bring my whole, real self before you. Amen.


Part 57: Not My Will But Yours Be Done

Scripture – Luke 22:39-42 (NRSV)

Jesus came out and went, as was his custom, to the Mount of Olives; and the disciples followed him. When he reached the place, he said to them, “Pray that you may not come into the time of trial.” Then he withdrew from them about a stone’s throw, knelt down, and prayed, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me; yet, not my will but yours be done.”

Focus

As he prayed on the night before his crucifixion, Jesus asked his Heavenly Father to “remove this cup.” If there was any other way forward besides the cross, Jesus wanted it. But he recognized the goodness and authority of his Father in praying, “Yet, not my will but yours be done.” The example of Jesus encourages us to pray freely and boldly, asking God whatever is on our hearts. Yet his example also teaches us to surrender, to submit to God’s will even when we don’t prefer it or understand it. We trust that God’s way is the best and choose that way out of loving obedience.

Devotion

In the previous devotion we focused on the shocking prayer of Jesus in the Garden, when he asked if the Father might “remove this cup” from him (Luke 22:42). That was a truly honest, bold prayer, especially given Jesus’s understanding that his death was necessary (see Luke 9:22, 17:25, 24:26). But faced with the pending reality not only of immense physical suffering but also of spiritual separation from his Heavenly Father, Jesus asked for the cup of judgment and death to be taken from him.

This daring prayer was framed, however, by Jesus’s clear acceptance of his Father’s wisdom, goodness, and authority. Before asking for the removal of the cup, Jesus said, “Father, if you are willing.” Jesus acknowledged that his Heavenly Father had the final say. Moreover, he recognized that the Father’s wisdom was supreme. If the Father knew that it was necessary for Jesus to drink the cup of suffering and judgment, then that was best.

Jesus’s acknowledgment of the Father’s supreme wisdom and authority was made even clearer in what followed after his request. He prayed, “remove this cup from me; yet, not my will but yours be done” (Luke 22:42). Not my will, but yours be done. Jesus taught his followers to pray, “Your kingdom come. Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10). This was, no doubt, a prayer that Jesus and his disciples often prayed. Yet it’s one thing to say “Your will be done” when life is more or less ordinary. It’s another thing altogether to pray “Your will be done” when facing something you dread, something you’d much rather avoid even though it appears to be God’s will.

When Jesus prays, “not my will but yours be done,” he surrendered. He stopped seeking to avoid that to which he was being called. He gave in to the Father’s will in an act of costly sacrifice and obedience. He surrendered his immediate preferences and hopes, choosing to embrace what God wanted for him.

I have never had to surrender to God in such a dramatic and devastating way. God has never asked me to suffer terribly on the way to dying. But there have been many times in my life when I have had to surrender to God, choosing the way I believed he had set for me rather than what I wanted for myself. Looking back, I can see the amazing grace and goodness in God’s guidance. Yet, at the time of surrender, it was difficult to give in, to pray as Jesus did, “Not my will but yours be done.” I expect you have had similar experiences, especially if you’ve been a Christian for a while.

In the season of Lent, I pray daily a prayer of surrender composed centuries ago by St. Ignatius. It’s called the Suscipe, from the first word of the prayer in Latin, which means “Take” or “Receive.” In English, the Suscipe goes like this:

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty,
my memory, my understanding,
and my entire will,
All I have and call my own.

You have given all to me.
To you, Lord, I return it.

Everything is yours; do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and your grace,
that is enough for me.

May God’s love and grace give you the freedom to pray this with an open heart.

Reflect

When you see Jesus’s surrendering to his Father’s will, how do you respond? What do you think? What do you feel?

Have you ever had an experience of surrendering intentionally to what you believed to be God’s will for you, even though this was not what you preferred at the time?

Is there something to which God is calling you now, something you’re resisting? Is there something you need to surrender to God today?

Act

Let me encourage you to copy the Suscipe prayer in a place where you’ll see it each day (in your phone, computer, Bible, etc.). Let this prayer be a consistent theme of your Lenten communication with the Lord.

Pray

Take, Lord, and receive all my liberty,
my memory, my understanding,
and my entire will,
All I have and call my own.

You have given all to me.
To you, Lord, I return it.

Everything is yours; do with it what you will.
Give me only your love and your grace,
that is enough for me. Amen.


Part 58: How Does God See You?

Scripture – Luke 22:54-62 (NRSV)

Then they seized [Jesus] and led him away, bringing him into the high priest’s house. But Peter was following at a distance. When they had kindled a fire in the middle of the courtyard and sat down together, Peter sat among them. Then a servant-girl, seeing him in the firelight, stared at him and said, “This man also was with him.” But he denied it, saying, “Woman, I do not know him.” A little later someone else, on seeing him, said, “You also are one of them.” But Peter said, “Man, I am not!” Then about an hour later still another kept insisting, “Surely this man also was with him; for he is a Galilean.” But Peter said, “Man, I do not know what you are talking about!” At that moment, while he was still speaking, the cock crowed. The Lord turned and looked at Peter. Then Peter remembered the word of the Lord, how he had said to him, “Before the cock crows today, you will deny me three times.” And he went out and wept bitterly.

Focus

How do you imagine God looking upon you? More to the point, how does God see you when you let him down? Does he look at you with rage? Or perhaps with cold judgment? As we consider how God sees us, we should remember how God is revealed through Jesus. Jesus is one who knows our weaknesses and offers mercy. Jesus teaches that God is like a father who looks upon his wayward son with compassion and runs to embrace him. God does not ignore or minimize our sin. But, by grace, he looks upon us with loving compassion.

Devotion

Last Friday we were with Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane as he prayed to his Heavenly Father, ultimately accepting God’s will that he go to the cross. All of a sudden, a crowd gathered around Jesus, led by Judas, who sought to betray Jesus with a kiss. When Jesus’s followers attempted to resist with physical force, Jesus rebuked them. He was then taken by the local officials to the house of the high priest.

Peter, one of Jesus’s closest and most committed disciples, followed Jesus, remaining outside of the high priest’s house. As he warmed himself by a fire, a servant girl said, “This man also was with him” (Luke 22:56), but Peter denied it. Shortly thereafter, another person identified Peter as a follower of Jesus, but again he denied it. Finally, another person insisted that Peter was with Jesus. His Galilean accent had given him away (22:59). Peter said, “Man, I do not know what you are talking about!” When a rooster crowed, “The Lord turned and looked at Peter. Then Peter remembered the word of the Lord, how he had said to him, ‘Before the cock crows today, you will deny me three times’” (22:61). Overcome with remorse for having denied his Lord, Peter “went out and wept bitterly” (22:62).

I have preached on this deeply moving passage several times throughout my pastoral career. Each time, I have focused on Peter’s experience. I talked about how fear can cause us to do even the thing we swore we would never do. I shared my compassion for Peter, admitting my own tendency to let fear move me to act in ways I know to be wrong. I can easily see myself as Peter in this story. Perhaps you can too.

As I re-read the story of Peter’s denial of Jesus in preparation for this devotion, however, I was struck by something I had not noticed before. It’s the simple line, “The Lord turned and looked at Peter” (Luke 22:61) Such a small detail adds to the pathos of this story. It was sad enough that Peter denied Jesus exactly as Jesus had predicted. But the fact that Jesus made eye contact with Peter in that moment multiplies the emotional power of the scene. Oh, how terrible it must have been for both men in that moment, for Jesus as he felt the sting of Peter’s denial, and for Peter as he felt such agonizing shame.

Luke does not tell us how Jesus looked as he gazed upon Peter. What we imagine, I suppose, has much to do with how we think and feel about Jesus. If we picture him as an angry hater of sin, then we would imagine his face filled with rage. If we think of Jesus as a strict judge, then his face would be cold and emotionless. But if we know Jesus for his compassion, if he is really one who understands our weaknesses (Hebrews 4:15), if he is going to the cross in part out of love for us, then we might picture the face of Jesus conveying deep understanding, empathy, sadness, and even love.

When I sift through my own life experience, I remember a time when something happened to me that was a bit like what I believe happened to Peter when Jesus looked at him. I was in fifth grade and had been talking out of turn in class. So my teacher sent me out of the room to sit on the ramp by our classroom. As I sat, licking my wounds, to my great chagrin I saw my mother walking on the sidewalk only fifty feet away. I knew she could see me, so I hid my face in shame, never making eye contact with her. I spent the rest of that day afraid of what she might say to me later on.

When I got home from school, I tried to sneak into my room, but my mom called to me. I knew I was out of luck. Still avoiding her gaze, I drew near. She said to me, “Mark, I was at school today and saw you sitting outside of your class. I’ll bet you were probably talking too much again. You know you have to work on that. But I’m sorry you had to sit outside. That must have been really embarrassing for you.” When I finally looked up at my mom, her face was full of sadness, kindness, and compassion. I ran to her and she hugged me tightly.

Given everything we know about Jesus, I think it’s reasonable to expect that he looked at Peter much as my mom looked at me. Perhaps in some ways, the compassionate face of Jesus increased Peter’s grief. He had denied not only his Lord, but also the One who loved him to the end and far beyond.

When you and I do what we know to be wrong, sometimes we’re so ashamed we can’t even bring our sin before God in prayer. Our fear and shame keep us from coming into his presence. We imagine God’s angry condemnation and we cower with our faces hidden. But the God made known to us in Jesus is not like that. Now, to be sure, God’s judges our sin. But this just Judge has taken upon himself the guilt, shame, and penalty associated with our sinfulness. God is the one whom Jesus portrayed as a father who, seeing his sin-saturated son from a distance, “was filled with compassion” and “ran and put his arms around [his son] and kissed him” (Luke 15:20). So, however we imagine God’s face, it must surely be the face of the father running to embrace and forgive his child.

During Lent, as you pay more attention than usual to your mortality, brokenness, and sinfulness, know that God looks upon you with the face of a compassionate father. The God who saved you in Jesus Christ loves you with an unfailing love.

Reflection

When you picture the scene outside of the high priest’s house, what does Peter look like? What does his face reveal? And what does Jesus look like when he gazes at Peter after Peter denied him?

Where do you get your image of God? What has influenced the way you think and feel about God?

Can you imagine God looking upon you with compassion even when you sin? If so, why? If not, why not?

Act

One of the most foundational passages of Scripture is the so-called Aaronic Blessing in Number 6:24-26. Take some time to meditate upon this passage:

The LORD bless you and keep you;
the LORD make his face to shine upon you, and be gracious to you;
the LORD lift up his countenance upon you, and give you peace.

Pray

Lord Jesus, as I imagine how you looked upon Peter that evening, I remember what Hebrews says about you, your empathy and compassion. I remember your description of the father running to embrace his wayward son. I can imagine the sadness and hurt you felt, even though you knew in advance this was going to happen. Yet I also know that you looked upon Peter with the love of one who was choosing to go the cross for him . . . and for me.

Gracious God, I never want to take my sin lightly. I never want to presume upon and cheapen your grace. Help me to know you truly in your holiness and justice. Yet, preserve me from picturing you without grace. May my image of you be an accurate reflection of what I find in Scripture. Most of all, may it be formed in the light of Jesus, his incarnation, his life, his death, and his resurrection. Amen.


Part 59: Hiding Behind Mockery

Scripture – Luke 22:63-65 (NRSV)

Now the men who were holding Jesus began to mock him and beat him; they also blindfolded him and kept asking him, “Prophesy! Who is it that struck you?” They kept heaping many other insults on him.

Focus

On the way to his crucifixion, Jesus was mocked by those who had captured him. Mockery is a way of hiding from people we don’t agree with or don’t like. But the way of Jesus is inconsistent with mockery that closes hearts, builds walls, and tears down other people. We who seek to follow Jesus mustn’t make fun of those who are different from us in beliefs, politics, lifestyles, or religious practice. We must follow Jesus in the way of love, loving both our neighbors and our enemies. There is no room for mockery in love.

Today’s devotion is part of the series Following Jesus Today.

Devotion

As Jesus was being held before his mock trial – by which I mean not a genuinely fair trial – those who were guarding him “began to mock him and beat him” (Luke 22:63). They played a cruel game with him, blindfolding him and then hitting him, saying, “Prophesy! Who is it that struck you?” (22:64). Obviously, they knew of Jesus’s reputation as a prophet and they were enjoying the chance to make fun of him while they hit him and insulted him.

I’d like to think with you for a few moments about mockery. The English verb “to mock” means “to treat with contempt or ridicule, to make fun of.” The Greek verb translated in verse 63 as “mock” meant “to deride, ridicule, make fun of, mock.” When we read today’s passage, we rightly imagine crude laughter, rude joking, and explicit humiliation, the sort of behavior that is part of mockery.

These days, followers of Jesus are sometimes the victims of mockery. The leading atheists love making believers look like fools. Certain popular comedians make fun of Christians (and sometimes, I’m sad to say, we rather deserve it). In the past few years, I’ve even read the statements of certain government officials that deride all believers as being dimwitted and unscientific. Though this is distressing, to be sure, it shouldn’t surprise us that we who follow Jesus are sometimes treated as he was.

But I must confess that I’m even more concerned about ways that Christians can use mockery to put down others and hide from their humanity. I’ve never heard a believer make fun of Jesus, but I have heard Christians put down people with whom they disagree. Believers on one side of the political spectrum can put down people on the other side—and this is a two-way street, by the way. Christians of one church or denomination can make fun of those who are not in their tribe, who worship differently than they do. Believers in Jesus can ridicule folks from other religious traditions, especially when their practices seem strange to us. In addition to being unkind and inconsistent with the example of Jesus, this sort of behavior prevents us from truly engaging with other human beings. We can hide behind our mockery so we don’t have to deal with ideas that stretch us or human beings whom we find difficult to love.

When I mock someone, I am slamming the door on walking the second mile with them. I am sealing off my heart from empathy. And I am making sure there is no chance I will love my neighbor or my enemy. The way of Jesus is not a humorless way. But his way is inconsistent with mockery that closes hearts, builds walls, and tears down other people.

Lent is a good time for us to examine our lives, to see if we are allowing mockery to keep us from loving our neighbors and our enemies. We can renew our commitment to following Jesus as he walks the second mile with others, and the third, and the fourth, . . . .

Reflect

Have you ever been the victim of mockery? How did it feel? How did you deal with it?

Have you ever mocked others? Do you sometimes make fun of people with whom you disagree politically, theologically, or ethnically?

Can you think of a time when you walked the second mile with someone who bugged you, someone you might instead have chosen to mock?

Act

If you sometimes mock people, this would be a good time to stop. But, beyond this, think of how you might reach out in love and respect to someone with whom you disagree.

Pray

Lord Jesus, as I read today’s passage I am saddened by what you endured. And, of course, the worst was yet to come. But the mockery you endured was so wrong. Those who made fun of you never had to deal with you as a person, not to mention the Savior and Lord of the world.

Lord, though I don’t think I would ever mock you, I can certainly use mockery to keep me from engaging deeply with others, especially those I don’t approve of. If I make fun of them I don’t have to take them seriously. I can avoid knowing them, walking the second mile with them, and showing them the love you want to give them through me. Help me, Lord, not to use humor in a way that breaks relationships and hinders the gospel. May I seek always to walk in your way.

To you be all the glory, Amen.


Part 60: What’s Jesus’s Line?

Scripture – Luke 22:66-71 (NRSV)

When day came, the assembly of the elders of the people, both chief priests and scribes, gathered together, and they brought [Jesus] to their council. They said, “If you are the Messiah, tell us.” He replied, “If I tell you, you will not believe; and if I question you, you will not answer. But from now on the Son of Man will be seated at the right hand of the power of God.” All of them asked, “Are you, then, the Son of God?” He said to them, “You say that I am.” Then they said, “What further testimony do we need? We have heard it ourselves from his own lips!”

Focus

The religious leaders in Jerusalem seemed to be interested in Jesus’s “line” of work. Did he think he was the Messiah? Even the Son of God? But the authorities weren’t really interested in Jesus’s answers. They were trying to entrap him. In the season of Lent we have the opportunity to ask in a fresh way, “Who is Jesus?” We can go deeper in our understanding of Jesus and in our relationship with him.

Devotion

As a young boy, I loved watching the television show What’s My Line? with my parents. The premise of this game show was simple. A mystery guest would appear, someone with an unusual “line” of work. The panel of celebrities would ask questions to try and figure out what the guest did for a living. I remember how happy I was to see if I could figure out the mysterious “line,” which I almost never did. But it was fun, nevertheless.

In a way, the examination of Jesus in Luke 22:66-71 reminds me of What’s My Line? Now, to be super clear, what happened here was no laughing matter. But the Jerusalem authorities were trying to figure out the “line” of Jesus. And Jesus, like the contestants on What’s My Line?, wasn’t making it easy for them.

Of course there was also a difference in motivation. The game show panel was wanting to discover a secret for the sake of entertainment. The Jerusalem authorities were wanting to find a reason to put Jesus to death.

They asked Jesus first whether he was the Messiah. This question did not have a simple answer because, though Jesus thought of himself in messianic terms, his understanding of the Messiah’s role was different from the one that was common in the first century. Moreover, Jesus sensed that there was no point in trying to engage in a serious conversation about messiahship with his interlocutors. They weren’t interested in learning what Jesus was really all about.

The fact that Jesus brought up the Son of Man is not altogether surprising since he often used this title in reference to himself. The Son of Man (the Hebrew/Aramaic phrase can mean simply “human being”) was envisioned as a glorious figure associated with the future coming of God’s kingdom (see Daniel 7:13-14). Jesus, however, complicated these expectations by showing that it was necessary for the Son of Man to suffer, die, and be raised from the dead (Luke 9:22). In today’s passage, however, Jesus spoke of himself as the Son of Man who will be enthroned next to God (Luke 22:69).

It was shocking to those listening to hear Jesus associate himself with the glorious, powerful Son of Man. So they asked, “Are you, then, the Son of God?” (Luke 22:70). The title “Son of God” could be used in Judaism in reference to the human king of Israel (see Psalm 2, for example). But asking Jesus if he was “the” Son of God went beyond merely a royal title. The authorities were asking if Jesus claimed a uniquely intimate, authoritative, and glorious position in relationship to God. He didn’t answer with a straight up “Yes,” but rather with an unsettling “You say that I am” (22:70). Yet this was enough for the officials, who believed Jesus had incriminated himself.

We wonder what exactly was the crime of Jesus. From the Roman point of view he was a rabble-rouser who threatened the peace of Judea. But from the perspective of the Jewish leaders, Jesus had committed blasphemy by associating himself so uniquely with God. Even if he didn’t say unmistakably, “I am the Son of God,” he implied this. Plus, he had done and said things that were appropriate for God alone, like referring to himself as “lord of the sabbath” (Luke 6:5) or forgiving a person’s sins in an apparently blasphemous way (Luke 5:20-21). For Jews in the first century, the gap between humankind and the divine was expansive, and Jesus kept doing and saying things that put him on God’s side of the chasm. This was simply unacceptable to the Jerusalem authorities.

As I reflect on this story from Luke 22, I am reminded of the fact that Jesus’s identity and work should not be narrowed down, though Christians often do this. We embrace Jesus as our personal Savior, which is great, but have little sense of his royal authority and glory, which is not so great. We rightly celebrate the salvation Jesus offers after we die, but we neglect the presence of his kingdom on earth today. We rightly understand that Jesus was not the political messiah expected by his compatriots, but we ignore the implications of his authority for our systems and structures.

In this season of Lent, we have the opportunity to reflect deeply on who Jesus was and who he is and the difference this makes. We can take time to consider the different “lines” of Jesus, the different roles he both redefined and fulfilled in such amazing ways. And we can ask how our lives might be different if we took seriously who Jesus seeks to be for us.

Reflect

Which of Jesus’s various titles and roles do you relate to most of the time?

Do you have any idea of what it might mean for you to take Jesus seriously as the Son of Man?

If you could sit down with Jesus and have a serious conversation about his “line,” what questions might you ask him?

Act

With a good friend or in your small group, talk about who Jesus is to you. What do you believe about him? How do you relate to him? What questions do you have for him? How might you grow into a deeper relationship with him?

Pray

Lord Jesus, as I read today’s passage from Luke, I continue to be sad about what you had to endure. But I thank you for choosing the way of servanthood, the way of suffering.

I confess, Lord, that it’s easier for me to relate to you in some ways but not others. I’m thrilled to have you as my Savior and Friend. I’m more hesitant about acknowledging you full as my Lord. And I’m often unsure about how I should respond to you as the Son of Man. What I know for sure, Jesus, is that there is so much more room for me to grow in my knowledge and experience of you. There are so many more ways for me to live as your disciple each day.

So help me, Lord, to know you more clearly, to love you more dearly, and to follow you more nearly, day by day. Amen.


Part 61: Jesus as a Big Giant Spoon

Scripture – Luke 23:1-5 (NRSV)

Then the assembly rose as a body and brought Jesus before Pilate. They began to accuse him, saying, “We found this man perverting our nation, forbidding us to pay taxes to the emperor, and saying that he himself is the Messiah, a king.” Then Pilate asked him, “Are you the king of the Jews?” He answered, “You say so.” Then Pilate said to the chief priests and the crowds, “I find no basis for an accusation against this man.” But they were insistent and said, “He stirs up the people by teaching throughout all Judea, from Galilee where he began even to this place.”

Focus

The opponents of Jesus brought accusations against him to Pontius Pilate, in the hope that he would be executed. Though several of their claims against Jesus were exaggerated or false, one was accurate. Jesus did indeed “stir up the people” from Galilee, where Jesus began his ministry, to Jerusalem, where it was soon to end. The Jesus who stirs things up in a major way, therefore, is rather like a big giant spoon. Will we allow Jesus to stir us up, to challenge our complacencies and call us to a whole new way of living?

Devotion

A number of years ago I was speaking at a Christian conference in Austin, Texas. One of the keynote speakers was a man who was well known for making big, bold, brash statements. He really enjoyed getting a rise out of his audience and whipping up controversy. In his conference talk, he blasted Christians for being too committed to rationality. We need to use more stories, images, and metaphors. He kept hammering away on the need for creative metaphors that will carry our meaning into the world. Predictably, folks in the crowd were pretty riled up after he finished.

Back at my hotel, guess who joined me in the elevator. That’s right, the speaker I had just heard. Though we didn’t know each other, I said to him, “You are a big giant spoon.” He looked puzzled, then unhappy, as if I were insulting him. “What do you mean?” he asked gruffly. I repeated my statement, “You are a big giant spoon.” Again, he said, “What are you trying to tell me?” I realized I was going to have to explain, lest I make this man my lifelong opponent. “You are a big giant spoon,” I said, “in that you do a great job stirring the pot. The talk you just gave on metaphors was a perfect example of you being a giant spoon.” As we exited the elevator, he looked at me quizzically, realizing that I had been trying to do exactly what he had urged so passionately, using an engaging metaphor. He may also have been a bit embarrassed that he didn’t get it until I offered a prosaic explanation. As he walked away he said, “Okay, then. Well, thanks, I guess.” Honestly, I thought he’d love being called a big giant spoon. Oh well.

Had the leaders in Jerusalem heard that man’s talk on metaphors, they might have called Jesus a big giant spoon. And, actually, that would have been a fair description. Many of their accusations against Jesus were not accurate, such as that Jesus had forbidden people to pay taxes to the emperor. And Jesus had never actually said he was the king in the sense of a political competitor to Caesar. But it was fair to say that he “stirs up the people by teaching throughout all Judea, from Galilee where he began even to this place” (Luke 23:5).

How did Jesus stir up the people? Certainly, his ability to do miracles, especially to heal people, awakened popular curiosity and drew the crowds. But it was Jesus’s message that seemed to have the most impact. When Jesus was teaching in the temple in Luke 19, for example, the leaders were trying to find a way to kill him “but they did not find anything they could do, for all the people were spellbound by what they heard” (Luke 19:47-48). The religious leaders were, in fact, “afraid of the people” because Jesus had stirred them up so much (Luke 22:2). So, when making their accusations to Pontius Pilate, the authorities could have said, metaphorically, Jesus is a great big spoon.

If we were to take seriously the teaching and example of Jesus, I suggest he’d be a great big spoon today. Through his faithful disciples he would stir things up, that’s for sure. He’d unsettle our own personal complacency and comfort, calling us to imitate his sacrificial service and even to love our enemies. Jesus would stir up things in our society with his proclamation of God’s kingdom, mercy, love, and justice (see, for example, Luke 4:16-30). Jesus would also stir up the church, calling us to care less about our personal preferences and privilege and more about serving “the least of these” (Matthew 25:40) and reaching out with grace to the lost sheep (Luke 15:3-7).

During Lent, we have the opportunity to ask the Lord if he’d like to stir up something in us. Yes, Jesus is the one who offers peace. But that doesn’t mean we will always feel comfortable around him. The real Jesus will expand our horizons, challenge our biases, disrupt our comfortable assumptions, and call us into his counter-cultural kingdom. He will stir up within us new compassion for the hurting and zeal for his holiness. So, if you’ll allow for the metaphor, will you let Jesus be a big giant spoon in your life?

Reflect

Has Jesus stirred anything up in your life recently? If so, what happened? If not, why not?

Do you think that perhaps you have become overly comfortable with Jesus? If so, what can you do to engage with Jesus in a new and deeper way?

Is there any context in your life in which you feel led, as a disciple of Jesus, to stir things up? If so, where is this and what do you feel called to do?

Act

It would be easy to say, “Go stir things up somewhere.” And perhaps you should. But it may be that, first of all, you need to give Jesus the freedom to stir things up in your life. Why don’t you take some time to talk with him about this?

Pray

Lord Jesus, I trust that you’re not offended when I call you a big giant spoon. You get the metaphor. Maybe you even like it. The religious leaders and the Romans wouldn’t have liked it, that’s for sure. You were a threat to the status quo, to the oppressive peace and order of Rome and its allies. They didn’t like how you stirred things up. Yet that didn’t stop you, until, of course, they killed you. But after that you really stirred things up!

You know, Lord, that I am not one to be drawn to disruption. I like things that are stable and safe, with maybe just a tiny bit of adventure. But I do want you to have the freedom to do in me anything you desire. So I invite you, Lord, to stir things up in me. I know you’ll do this with mercy and wisdom. I know you want the best for me. So I surrender to you my love of comfort and familiarity. Do in me – and then through me – what you will. Not my will, but your will be done. Amen.


Part 62: Joy to the World . . . in Lent?

Scripture – Luke 19:37-40 (NRSV)

As he was now approaching the path down from the Mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to praise God joyfully with a loud voice for all the deeds of power that they had seen, saying,

“Blessed is the king
+++who comes in the name of the Lord!
Peace in heaven,
+++and glory in the highest heaven!”

Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, order your disciples to stop.” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the stones would shout out.”

Focus

As Jesus entered Jerusalem on the day we know as Palm Sunday, his disciples celebrated the coming of their king with loud praise to God. Some less enthusiastic onlookers told Jesus to get them to stop. He answered by saying if they were silent, the stones would shout out. His response is consistent with the Old Testament image of nature offering praise to God as he comes to bring justice and salvation. Today may we join with fields, floods, rocks, hills, and plains in offering joyous praise to God for the coming of Jesus our King.

Devotion

This coming Sunday is Palm Sunday, the day when Christians remember the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem five days before his crucifixion. Though I recently shared a reflection on Luke’s account of Jesus’s entry (see Welcoming King Jesus), it seems good to me to revisit this story today, focusing on something I didn’t comment about last time.

As you may recall, when Jesus rides into Jerusalem on a colt the multitude of his disciples welcome him with shouts of praise, “Blessed in the king who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven, and glory in the highest heaven!” (Luke 19:38). But not everyone was pleased. Some Pharisees – apparently not all of the Pharisees present there – cried out to Jesus, “Teacher, order your disciples to stop” (19:39). Jesus, however, did not do what they had asked, answering, “I tell you, if these were silent, the stones would shout out” (19:40).

That was certainly a bold claim. Jesus was saying that the celebration of his kingship and God’s glory are so necessary, so right, so inevitable that silencing the disciples wouldn’t stop the praise. Nature itself would continue the celebration.

The notion of nature praising God and the coming of God’s justice was not original to Jesus. It can be found at various places in the Hebrew Scriptures (for example, Isaiah 44:23 and 55:12). Psalm 98 is one of the most familiar Old Testament passages in which nature celebrates the coming of God. The whole earth is invited to “Make a joyful noise to the LORD” (Psalm 98:4). More specifically, the psalm writer says, “Let the sea roar, and all that fills it; the world and those who live in it. Let the floods clap their hands; let the hills sing together for joy at the presence of the LORD, for he is coming to judge the earth. He will judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with equity” (Psalm 98:7-9). So, when Jesus comes to Jerusalem to complete the work of salvation, he echoes Psalm 98 in recognizing that praise is mandatory, if not from people, then from nature itself.

We are acquainted with the themes of Psalm 98 because they are engraved in our hearts through the words of the beloved Christmas carol “Joy to the World.” Isaac Watts wrote this song as a Christ-inspired interpretation of Psalm 98, adding it to a collection of Psalm-based hymns. Notice how praise from nature appears in these familiar lines:

Joy to the world! the Lord is come;
Let earth receive her King;
Let every heart prepare him room,
And heaven and nature sing,
And heaven and nature sing,
And heaven, and heaven, and nature sing.

Joy to the world! the Saviour reigns;
Let men their songs employ;
While fields and floods, rocks, hills, and plains
Repeat the sounding joy,
Repeat the sounding joy,
Repeat, repeat the sounding joy.

So, it might even be appropriate to sing “Joy to the World” in Lent, especially on Palm Sunday. Now I must confess that my tradition-shaped sensibilities might struggle with this a bit. I suppose it could even be good for me to have to stretch a little. But, whether or not we actually sing “Joy to the World” in this season of the year, we do welcome the coming king, indeed the King of kings and Lord of lords. We join with fields and floods, rocks, hills, and plains, to repeat the joy of Jesus’s coming.

Yet we also recognize that his entry into Jerusalem set in motion the events that led to his crucifixion. In a few days his kingship will be mocked by “King of the Jews” posted on the cross above his head. So, our celebration on Palm Sunday is tempered by what lies ahead for Jesus, even as it will be surpassed by the joyous celebration yet to come on Easter.

In the season of Lent, our worship is often quiet as we acknowledge our mortality and get in touch with our need for a Savior. But we still rejoice because of the goodness and grace of God in Christ. We can’t be silent, allowing the rocks to praise in our place. Rather, we join all creation in celebrating the coming of King Jesus. He came to Jerusalem to die for us that we might live now and forever in his kingdom.

Reflect

When you think of nature offering praise to God, what comes to mind? What images? What memories? What places?

If your church were to sing “Joy to the World” on Palm Sunday, how would you react?

In what ways do you intentionally live under the rule of King Jesus?

Act

Take time today to offer intentional and joyful praise to Jesus the king who has come to save us.

Pray

Lord Jesus, I am moved by the image of the stones offering you praise. Indeed, you are worthy of worship from all creation, from fields, floods, rocks, hills, and plains. May I join my voice to theirs today, welcoming you as King, not just in Jerusalem, but also in my own heart and life. May I live for the praise of your royal glory each day, in all that I do. All hail, King Jesus! Amen.


Part 63: Taking Responsibility for Jesus’s Death

Scripture – Luke 23:13-25 (NRSV)

Pilate then called together the chief priests, the leaders, and the people, and said to them, “You brought me this man as one who was perverting the people; and here I have examined him in your presence and have not found this man guilty of any of your charges against him. Neither has Herod, for he sent him back to us. Indeed, he has done nothing to deserve death. I will therefore have him flogged and release him.”

Then they all shouted out together, “Away with this fellow! Release Barabbas for us!” (This was a man who had been put in prison for an insurrection that had taken place in the city, and for murder.) Pilate, wanting to release Jesus, addressed them again; but they kept shouting, “Crucify, crucify him!” A third time he said to them, “Why, what evil has he done? I have found in him no ground for the sentence of death; I will therefore have him flogged and then release him.” But they kept urgently demanding with loud shouts that he should be crucified; and their voices prevailed. So Pilate gave his verdict that their demand should be granted. He released the man they asked for, the one who had been put in prison for insurrection and murder, and he handed Jesus over as they wished.

Focus

Historians debate who was directly responsible for Jesus’s death. However we answer this historical question, however, there is a more pressing question to be considered. From a spiritual point of view, who was responsible for the crucifixion of Jesus? Christians believe that, in a real sense, we bear such responsibility because of our sin. Even so, we must recognize that Jesus himself chose to die. He was not a powerless victim. He went to the cross out of obedience to his Heavenly Father and out love for the world . . . including you and me.

Devotion

Biblical scholars and historians hold various views on the question of who was responsible for the death of Jesus. On first glance, our passage from Luke seems to make it clear that Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judea, did not want to kill Jesus and only did so because of pressure from Jewish leaders in Jerusalem. Pilate said, for example, “he has done nothing to deserve death” (Luke 23:15). He only gave in to the Jewish demands for crucifixion because they would be satisfied with nothing less.

Painting of the crucifixion from Taormina, Sicily. © Mark D. Roberts. All rights reserved.

This is one possible reading of the Pontius Pilate story. But, after studying the Gospel narratives closely, I believe it’s not the best reading. Allow me to explain an alternative.

Pontius Pilate was known to be an arrogant, hard-hearted, tyrannical prefect, one who did many things to antagonize and terrorize the Jews under his governance. He was not one to be pushed around, especially by the Jews. Thus, if Pilate truly did not want Jesus to be crucified, it’s unlikely that he’d have given in to Jewish pressure. That would have been a blow to his pretentious pride.

Given the fact that Jesus had been stirring up the people, that he proclaimed the kingdom of God not Caesar, and that his popularity was growing (for example, see Luke 19:47-48 and 22:2), it’s likely that Pilate would have wanted to get Jesus out of the way somehow. But doing so during the Passover, when Jerusalem was overflowing with Jewish pilgrims, would have been extremely risky. If Pilate were perceived by the crowds as being responsible for Jesus’s death, then they might have revolted, which is the main thing Pilate wanted to avoid. But, if Pilate could manipulate things so that it appeared that the Jewish leaders were responsible for the death of Jesus – even though Pilate alone had the legal authority over crucifixion – then Pilate could kill two birds with one stone. He could kill Jesus, thus getting rid of a rabble-rouser. And he could enhance his own popularity while undermining the popularity of the Jewish leaders. So Pilate pretended not to want to crucify Jesus, believing that the Jewish authorities would insist on his death. Thus, they would appear to be responsible for Jesus’s death, even though, from a legal point of view, only Pilate could have sentenced him to crucifixion.

Pilate’s ploy worked, at least in many Christian interpretations of the passion narrative. This often fueled Christian anti-Semitism, something so contrary to the ministry and message of Jesus. Now, it’s important to note that the oldest and most universal of Christian creeds (Apostles Creed, Nicene Creed) both say that Christ was crucified under Pontius Pilate. Jews are not mentioned. But many Christians, nevertheless, put primary blame for the death of Jesus on the Jews, and used this as a rationale for prejudicial, hateful attitudes and behaviors. (If you’d like a more thorough explanation of the historical perspective I’m advocating here, check out my article: “The Death of Jesus: Why Was It Necessary?”)

Of course, it’s quite possible that my reading of this story is incorrect, though I’m not the only New Testament scholar to affirm it. But, in a way, it doesn’t really matter. Why? Because, for one thing, we know for sure that Pilate alone bore ultimate authority for sentencing Jesus to death, no matter what got him to that decision. That’s why our ancient creeds read as they do. Yet, even more importantly, we miss the main point if we focus only on the historical reasons for Jesus’s death. There is something more significant to be considered, something profoundly relevant to our faith and life today.

No matter how we explain the historical reasons for Jesus’s crucifixion, Christians understand that we are profoundly responsible for his death from a spiritual point of view. Jesus died in order to take upon himself the penalty for human sin, including your sin and my sin. There is a very real sense in which I am responsible for Jesus’s death . . . and so are you.

But, perhaps even more importantly, Jesus actually chose to die in fulfillment of his Father’s will. Jesus didn’t kill himself, of course. But he freely chose the way of suffering, the way of the cross, the way of death. He did so out of obedience to the Father and love for us. We saw this as Jesus prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane (Luke 22:39-46). And we see it clearly in the Gospel of John, “For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life in order to take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it up again. I have received this command from my Father” (John 10:17-18). Clearly, Jesus claimed ultimate responsibility for his death.

During Holy Week, the last week of Lent, you have an opportunity to focus on the death of Jesus; not just what happened in history, but also why it happened and what difference this makes today. The historical reasons matter, of course. But so much more do the spiritual reasons. Jesus chose to die as an expression of God’s love for the world, including you. So, as you acknowledge your responsibility for the death of Jesus, don’t miss the gospel truth. Jesus chose to die for you out of love to set you free from sin and death. That is indeed good news.

Reflect

Do you think of yourself as in any way responsible for the death of Jesus? If so, why? If not, why not?

Given what Jesus said in John 10:17-18, how comfortable are you with saying that Jesus was, in some profound way, responsible for his death?

Do you feel God’s love for you as you reflect on the cross of Jesus?

Act

Reserve a few minutes today to reflect quietly on the death of Jesus. See what the Lord wants to press upon your heart.

Pray

Lord Jesus, from a certain perspective, the rulers in Jerusalem were responsible for your death. Their collusion led to the sentence Pilate laid upon you. Yet, Lord, I recognize today that I am also responsible for your death in a way. You died for me. You died in my place. You bore my sin upon the cross so that I might be forgiven and free. How I thank you for your grace!

But you were not driven to the cross against your will. You were not a helpless victim. You chose the cross in obedience to your Father’s will and out of love for the world. Nobody took your life from you apart from your decision to offer it. O Lord, how amazing is your love!

As I reflect on your death during this Holy Week, may I come to a truer understanding and a deeper experience of your love and grace. Amen.


Part 64: Carrying the Cross

Scripture – Luke 23:26 (NRSV)

As they led him away, they seized a man, Simon of Cyrene, who was coming from the country, and they laid the cross on him, and made him carry it behind Jesus.

Focus

Simon of Cyrene was watching Jesus carry his cross to Calvary when, all of a sudden, he was pressed into service by the Roman soldiers. He had to carry the cross when Jesus was no longer strong enough to do so. In a way, we who follow Jesus are like Simon. We heed Jesus’s call to take up our “cross,” putting aside self-interest as we offer all that we are to the Lord.

Devotion

What a shock this must have been for Simon! After traveling almost a thousand miles from Cyrene in northern Africa to Jerusalem (Cyrene was where Libya is today), he found the city jammed with pilgrims. They, like Simon himself, had come to celebrate the Passover in Jerusalem.

Simon of Cyrene helps Jesus to Carry the Cross. Painting © Linda E.S. Roberts, 2007. For permission to use this picture, contact Mark D. Roberts.

Painting © Linda E.S. Roberts, 2007. For permission to use this picture, contact Mark D. Roberts.

It’s likely that Simon set up camp out in the countryside alongside tens of thousands of other visitors. On his way into the city one day, he stumbled into what might have looked from a distance like a parade. But then, as he drew near, Simon saw the horrific spectacle of a badly beaten man stumbling as he was forced to carry the beam of his cross on the way to being crucified. We don’t know whether Simon had any knowledge of Jesus prior to their encounter on the road to Golgotha. It’s likely that he knew nothing about the suffering man before that moment.

As Simon watched in horror, all of a sudden he found himself pressed into action. The Roman soldiers, recognizing that Jesus didn’t have sufficient strength to carry his cross by himself, “seized” Simon and demanded that he carry the cross instead. No doubt Simon was hesitant, fearing that he might end up sharing Jesus’s fate. Yet he knew enough not to provoke the soldiers, so he took the cross as ordered. We don’t know much more about Simon than this, since he disappears from the biblical record at this point (see note below for more information on Simon).

Although Simon only helped to carry the cross of Jesus and was not actually crucified, he nevertheless illustrates a profound theological truth found in the letters of Paul in the New Testament. In the letter to the Galatians we read:

I have been crucified with Christ; and it is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. (Galatians 2:19b-20)

The letter to the Romans contains even more detail about what it means to be crucified with Christ:

What then are we to say? Should we continue in sin in order that grace may abound? By no means! How can we who died to sin go on living in it? Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life.

For if we have been united with him in a death like his, we will certainly be united with him in a resurrection like his. We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin. For whoever has died is freed from sin. But if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus. (Romans 6:1-11)

When we put our faith in Christ, we shared in his death, not by literally dying, but by dying to sin. Our “old self” is crucified so that we might be set free from our bondage to sin. Thus, we are alive in Christ, who lives in us.

Therefore, in a sense, we identify with Simon of Cyrene, who found himself a surprised participant in the crucifixion of Christ. Like Simon, many of us became Christians without really understanding that we were dying to our old selves so that we might live anew in Christ. We were pitched a gospel of salvation and eternal life without the corollary call to servanthood, sacrifice, and death to sin and self. Thus, it was only later in our Christian pilgrimage when we discovered, like Simon, that we were expected to be “crucified with Christ.”

Unlike Simon, however, we aren’t forced to pick up the cross of Christ. Jesus doesn’t use his power and authority to coerce us into being his disciples. Rather, he invites us to follow him even though, as our Lord, he could demand this of us. Instead, Jesus beckons to us, calling us to take up the cross for him even as he took up the cross for us. As he once said to those who were interested in following him:

If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross daily and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake will save it (Luke 9:23-24).

If we take up the cross of Christ, we will lose our lives, only to discover that we have found true life in him.

During this Holy Week, we reflect on the meaning of Christ’s death on the cross. We marvel at what he did for us and our salvation. As we do, we also remember the call of Jesus to imitate his sacrifice as we devote our whole lives to him and as we express this devotion by serving others in every sector of life.

Reflect

Use your imagination to put yourself in Simon’s shoes. How would you have felt when you were compelled to carry the cross of Jesus?

How do you understand what it means to be “crucified with Christ”?

What does it mean for you, in your daily life, to take up your cross and follow Jesus?

Act

Choose to do something today in service to the Lord. It will likely be serving another person in his name.

Pray

Lord Jesus, the powerful example of Simon reminds me that I am also to take up my cross and follow you. You have called me to die to myself so that I might live for you. I confess that sometimes I resist this call, even though I know that in dying to myself I find true life in you. So help me, Lord, to carry my cross, to give my life away so that I might receive the abundant life of your kingdom.

I could not do this were it not for the fundamental fact that you took my place on the cross. Through you, I am forgiven and invited into the fullness of life. In your death, I am raised to new life. All thanks and praise be to you, Lord Jesus, for bearing my sin on the cross, so that I might bear the cross into eternal life, both now and forever. Amen.

A Historical Note about Simon of Cyrene

The Gospel of Mark names Simon’s sons as Alexander and Rufus, presumably because these men were known to the community for whom Mark was writing (Rome? see Mark 15:21). Paul also mentions a Rufus in the close of his letter to the Romans (Romans 16:13). He might be the son of Simon, but this is only speculation. Some second-century Gnostics argued that it wasn’t Jesus who died on the cross, but Simon of Cyrene. There’s no basis for this in reliable historical texts. Some Muslims also hold this view, since they deny that Jesus died on the cross. Because of Simon’s North African origin, it’s likely that he was a Black man.


Part 65: Unexpected King. Unexpected Salvation.

Scripture – Luke 23:32-38 (NRSV)

Two others also, who were criminals, were led away to be put to death with him. When they came to the place that is called The Skull, they crucified Jesus there with the criminals, one on his right and one on his left. Then Jesus said, “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.” And they cast lots to divide his clothing. And the people stood by, watching; but the leaders scoffed at him, saying, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Messiah of God, his chosen one!” The soldiers also mocked him, coming up and offering him sour wine, and saying, “If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself!” There was also an inscription over him, “This is the King of the Jews.”

Focus

As Jesus was being crucified, a sign placed above his head proclaimed, “The King of the Jews.” The nearby leaders and soldiers mocked Jesus, saying “If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself!” They did not realize that Jesus was exercising his royal duty by giving up his life for others. They did not understand that, by not saving himself, Jesus was becoming the Savior of the world. He was a most unexpected King who would offer a most unexpected salvation.

Devotion

All four of the biblical gospels report that a sign was placed above Jesus on the cross. It identified him as “the King of the Jews” (23:38). It had been put there by soldiers following the specific orders of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judea. But we mustn’t read this as Pilate’s statement of faith in Jesus. Rather, the prefect was seeking to mock Jesus and, indeed, all of the Jewish people. The terrible power of Rome, seen horrendously in the act of crucifixion, was what came down on any who proclaimed a kingdom other than that of Caesar. Pilate was saying, in effect, “You mess with our kingdom, this is what you get. Here, you trouble-making Jews, is your king, dying horribly on a Roman cross. Deal with it!” (In art, Pilate’s sign is often represented by the letters “INRI,” which represent the Latin words meaning “Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews.”)

Of course Pilate didn’t grasp the irony of the sign he had placed above Jesus. He did not believe that Jesus was in any way a true king. John’s Gospel records a snippet of conversation between Pilate and Jesus, in which Pilate asked Jesus if he was the king of the Jews (John 18:33). Jesus responded that his kingdom was “not from this world” (John 18:36). That seemed to satisfy Pilate, who changed the subject by asking “What is truth?” (John 18:38). He saw that Jesus was nothing like a real king, one with earthly power and authority. Jesus wouldn’t be sitting on a royal throne. He’d soon be hanging on a Roman cross, which is about as far from real kingship as one could be, from Pilate’s point of view.

The irony of Pilate’s sign is that it was true, but not in the way Pilate understood it. Jesus had indeed proclaimed the kingdom of God. He had acted in ways that revealed his own kingly authority. Yet he was not the king in any ordinary sense. He looked nothing like a true king from the Roman point of view. And he did not fulfill the kingly role that the Jewish people expected of the true messiah. In particular, Jesus did not save his people from Roman political domination. That’s what the messianic king was supposed to do, according to Jewish speculation. But Jesus didn’t exercise that kind of power, nor did he aspire to it.

Moreover, though he had been known as a miracle worker, Jesus’s saving power appeared to have deserted him on the cross. The Jewish leaders watching the crucifixion said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is the Messiah of God, his chosen one!” (Luke 23:35). The Roman soldiers chimed in with their mockery, “If you are the King of the Jews, save yourself!” (23:37). Yet, what neither the leaders nor the soldiers understood was that Jesus, as God’s messianic King, had no intention of saving himself. He had come to save others. In fact, he had come to save others through his death. If Jesus had accessed divine power to save himself from the cross, then he would not have become the Savior of the world.

Jesus was a most unexpected King. No true king, from the Jewish and Roman perspectives, would die on a cross. No true king would sacrifice himself for the sake of others.

Jesus was a most unexpected Savior. Nobody other than Jesus himself, not even his closest followers, understood that the salvation of Jesus would come through his dying on the cross. What appeared to be the ultimate defeat of Jesus and his mission was, in fact, the victory of God over sin and death.

Jesus is not just the King of the Jews, however. He is the true king over all things. He is the king on whose robe is inscribed, “King of kings and Lord of lords” (Revelation 19:16). Everything on earth and in heaven belongs ultimately to King Jesus. One day his sovereignty will be recognized as every knee bows before him (Philippians 2:10). In the meanwhile, we who follow Jesus have the chance to acknowledge his kingly authority both in our words and in our lives. We proclaim King Jesus through living each moment under his sovereignty by seeking his justice, sharing his grace, and showing his love.

In this final week of Lent, as we reflect on the death of Jesus, may we affirm his kingship over all creation, including our own lives. May we offer ourselves to Jesus as his subjects, eager to live for his purposes and glory.

Reflect

What expectations do you have for Jesus?

Have you ever been disappointed when Jesus didn’t live up to your expectations for him?

What does it mean for you to live with Jesus as your King and your Savior?

Act

Take some time to reflect on the last question. Is Jesus your King in a way that makes a difference in how you live each day? What might it be like for you to be more intentional about recognizing Jesus’s royal authority over your life?

Pray

Lord Jesus, in a sadly ironic way Pilate got it right. You were the King of the Jews, but not in the way anyone expected. Today, you are still King, though not only of the Jews. You are King of kings and Lord of lords. You are sovereign over all things in heaven and on earth. I praise you today as the King.

And I recognize you as my King. You are the rightful authority over my life. You have every right to teach, guide, lead, and govern me as you wish. I offer myself today as your subject, your servant. May I live in your ways and for your purposes each day, in all that I do. Amen.


Part 66: Jesus Remembers You

Scripture – Luke 23:39-43 (NRSV)

One of the criminals who were hanged there kept deriding him and saying, “Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us!” But the other rebuked him, saying, “Do you not fear God, since you are under the same sentence of condemnation? And we indeed have been condemned justly, for we are getting what we deserve for our deeds, but this man has done nothing wrong.” Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” He replied, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise.”

Focus

One of the criminals crucified with Jesus cried out, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” Jesus responded, “Today you will be with me in Paradise.” When we cry out to Jesus, he hears us and responds with matchless grace. We don’t have to have perfect theology or live a perfect life in order to be remembered by Jesus. He is with us, not only in the future, but also right now.

Devotion

In yesterday’s devotion we saw that as Jesus hung on the cross, he was mocked by the leaders of Jerusalem and the Roman soldiers (Luke 23:35-37). One of the two criminals being crucified with Jesus added his own measure of derision (23:39). But the other crucified criminal sensed that Jesus was being treated unjustly. “This man has done nothing wrong,” he said. After speaking up for Jesus, he cried out, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom” (23:42).

The thief asks Jesus to remember him. Painting © Linda E.S. Roberts, 2007. For permission to use this picture, contact Mark D. Roberts.

Painting © Linda E.S. Roberts, 2007. For permission to use this picture, contact Mark D. Roberts.

Jesus responded to this criminal, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise” (23:43). The word “paradise,” from the Greek word paradeisos, which meant “garden,” was used in the Greek Old Testament for the Garden of Eden. In Greek-speaking Judaism of the time of Jesus, paradeisos was associated with heaven and also with the future when God would restore all things to the perfection of the Garden. Paradise was sometimes thought to be the place where righteous people went after death as they awaited resurrection in the age to come. This seems to be the way Jesus used “paradise” in today’s passage.

We have before us one of the most astounding and encouraging verses in all of Scripture. . . and also one of the most perplexing. Jesus promised that the criminal would be with him in Paradise. Yet Luke gives us no reason to believe this man had been a follower of Jesus or even a believer in him in any well-developed sense. The man might have felt sorry for his sins, but he did not obviously repent. Rather, the criminal’s cry to be remembered seems more like a desperate, last-gasp effort. If indeed Jesus was some sort of king, the man figured, then he might as well ask to be included in Jesus’s kingdom. This was indeed mustard seed faith, a tiny bit at most. Yet Jesus assured this baby believer that he would join Jesus in Paradise that very day.

Though we should make every effort to have right theology, and though we should live our lives each day as active disciples of Jesus, in the end our relationship with him comes down to simple trust, naked dependence on his grace. “Jesus, remember me,” we cry, just like the criminal in our story. And Jesus, embodying the mercy of God, says to us, “You will be with me in Paradise.” We are welcome to that place of eternal glory not because we have decent theology, and not because we are living decently, but because God is “rich in mercy” and wants to show us “the immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus” (Ephesians 2:4,7).

Indeed, Jesus will remember you when he comes into his kingdom. But you don’t have to wait to be remembered by Jesus. In a matter of speaking, he “remembers” you right now. Through the Spirit, he is present in your life. When you serve others in his name, you are serving Jesus. You don’t even have to wait for Paradise in order to know that Jesus is with you. When you face the uncertainties and fears of this life, when you endure suffering and loss, when you wonder if God is there for you, know that Jesus has not forgotten you. He is with you. He remembers you . . . even right now!

Reflect

Have you staked your life on Jesus? Have you put your ultimate trust in him? If so, why? If not, why not?

Do you have confidence that, when your time comes, you will be with Jesus in Paradise? If so, why? If not, why not?

How do you respond to the idea that Jesus “remembers” you right now?

Act

Take time to ponder the fact that Jesus will remember you and is remembering you at this moment. Talk to him about this, expressing your thanks. Let Jesus know how you need him in this very moment.

Pray

Lord Jesus, how I wonder at your grace and mercy! When we cry out to you, you hear us. When we ask you to remember us when you come into your kingdom, you offer the promise of Paradise. Your mercy, dear Lord, exceeds anything we might imagine. It embraces us, encourages us, heals us.

O Lord, though my situation is so different from the criminal who cried out to you, I am nevertheless quite like him. Today I live trusting you and you alone. My life, both now and in the age to come, is in your hands.

And so I pray: Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom! Jesus, remember me today as I seek to live in your kingdom in all I do! Amen.


Part 67: Giving All You Are to God

Scripture – Luke 23:44-49 (NRSV)

It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon, while the sun’s light failed; and the curtain of the temple was torn in two. Then Jesus, crying with a loud voice, said, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” Having said this, he breathed his last. When the centurion saw what had taken place, he praised God and said, “Certainly this man was innocent.” And when all the crowds who had gathered there for this spectacle saw what had taken place, they returned home, beating their breasts. But all his acquaintances, including the women who had followed him from Galilee, stood at a distance, watching these things.

Focus

Just before Jesus died on the cross, he quoted a portion of Psalm 31, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” He had done all that the Father had called him to do, and now he was giving himself fully and finally to the Father. As we face such uncertain times, as we continue to face challenges that feel overwhelming, we are encouraged to echo the words of Jesus, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” We find freedom and hope when we give to God all that we are, seeking his kingdom above everything else.

Devotion

Today is Good Friday, a day when Christians around the world remember and reflect on the death of Christ on the cross. The name “Good Friday” is ironic, of course, because in a sense what happened on this day is arguably the worst thing that human beings ever did—torturing and killing the Son of God. Yet, what happened on this day is arguably the best thing that God ever did on our behalf, taking our sin upon himself in Jesus so that in his death we might find life, eternal life, life to the fullest.

On the cross, Jesus said very little, and what he said is traditionally represented as his “seven last words.” Two of these “words” of Jesus were quotations from the Psalms. Earlier, Jesus echoed Psalm 22:1, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” to express his anguish (see Mark 15:34). Later, Jesus borrowed from Psalm 31:5, which appears in Luke 23:46 as “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.”

By praying this portion of Psalm 31, Jesus was putting his post-mortem future in the hands of his Heavenly Father. It was as if he was saying, “Whatever happens to me after I die is your responsibility, Father. I trust you.”

But, when we look carefully at the Psalm Jesus quoted, we see that more is going on here than what at first meets the eye. Psalm 31 begins with a cry for divine help:

In you, O LORD, I seek refuge;
do not let me ever be put to shame;
in your righteousness deliver me (Psalm 31:1).

But then this psalm mixes asking for God’s deliverance with a confession of God’s strength and faithfulness:

Into your hand I commit my spirit;
you have redeemed me, O LORD, faithful God (Psalm 31:5).

By the end, Psalm 31 offers praise for God’s salvation:

Blessed be the LORD,
for he has wondrously shown his steadfast love to me
when I was beset as a city under siege (Psalm 31:21).

By quoting a portion of Psalm 31, therefore, Jesus not only entrusted his future to his Father, but also implied that he would be delivered and exonerated. Jesus surely knew the full truth of Psalm 31. He understood that God would not deliver him from death by crucifixion. But beyond this horrific death lay something marvelous. “Into your hand I commit my spirit” points back to the familiar suffering of David in Psalm 31 and forward to the resurrection of Jesus. Thus, the final word of Jesus from the cross foreshadows the coming victory and joy of Easter.

We live in uncertain times. Though vaccinations are reducing the threat of the novel coronavirus and hold the promise of eventual deliverance from this deadly COVID-19 pandemic, so much is still unknown and unpredictable. We wonder what will happen with the world’s economy. We worry that injustices revealed by the pandemic might be ignored if “life returns to normal.” We recognize that the lives of millions of people have been injured by the ravages of death and disease. So, even in our hope we wrestle with uncertainty.

In such a time as this, the last word of Jesus is particularly relevant, encouraging, and challenging. Though we will do our best to mend our world and to help its citizens to flourish, in the end, we all pray as did Jesus, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” If we have put our trust in Jesus, then we belong to God both now and forever. So, as we reflect on Jesus’s death, we echo his words as we pray, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit. I give you all that I am.”

Reflect

How do you deal with the uncertainties associated with the hoped-for end to the COVID-19 pandemic?

Have you put your life and, indeed, your life beyond this life, in God’s hands?

How do you experience God’s salvation through Christ in your life today?

Act

Set aside some time to examine your life. Have you given all that you are to God? Do you trust him fully? Or, like most people, are you holding back in some ways? Talk with God about what you discover through your examination.

Pray

When I survey the wondrous cross
On which the Prince of glory died,
My richest gain I count but loss,
And pour contempt on all my pride.

Forbid it, Lord, that I should boast,
Save in the death of Christ my God!
All the vain things that charm me most,
I sacrifice them to His blood.

See from His head, His hands, His feet,
Sorrow and love flow mingled down!
Did e’er such love and sorrow meet,
Or thorns compose so rich a crown?

Were the whole realm of nature mine,
That were a present far too small;
Love so amazing, so divine,
Demands my soul, my life, my all. Amen.

(Hymn by Isaac Watts, 1707)


Part 68: Why the Burial of Jesus Matters

Scripture – Luke 23:50-56 (NRSV)

Now there was a good and righteous man named Joseph, who, though a member of the council, had not agreed to their plan and action. He came from the Jewish town of Arimathea, and he was waiting expectantly for the kingdom of God. This man went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then he took it down, wrapped it in a linen cloth, and laid it in a rock-hewn tomb where no one had ever been laid. It was the day of Preparation, and the sabbath was beginning. The women who had come with him from Galilee followed, and they saw the tomb and how his body was laid. Then they returned, and prepared spices and ointments.

Focus

The Gospel of Luke, like the other biblical Gospels, describes in some detail the burial of Jesus. Why? First, the burial of Jesus underscored the fact that he really died on the cross. He really bore the penalty for human sin through his death. Second, the burial of Jesus sets the stage for what is coming, namely the resurrection. As we reflect on the death and burial of Jesus, we are struck by the amazing love of God for us, even as we are prepared for the celebration of Easter.

Devotion

On this Holy Saturday, I’d like to reflect with you on what happened right after Jesus died on the cross. Luke tells us that his body was placed in a tomb. This was better treatment than many crucified people would have received. Their bodies were often discarded by Roman soldiers and left exposed, unless they had families or friends nearby to care for them. The body of Jesus was fortunate enough to receive unusual attention from a man named Joseph, who was both a member of the Sanhedrin and a follower of Jesus. He made sure the body of his Lord was appropriately buried, so that, later, the bones of Jesus could be finally interred in an ossuary (a special box for bones), according to the common cultural practice. Little did Joseph know that God had other plans for the body of Jesus.

In most human societies appropriate burial of dead bodies is a sacred tradition. It matters profoundly that we ensure the proper resting place for those who have died. Yet, after burials happen, we don’t generally mention them specifically. For example, my father died in 1986. I’ve spoken of his death probably 500 times since then, but I don’t think I’ve ever said, “My dad died in 1986 and then he was buried.” Burial, however significant to us, is something we assume and don’t need to point out specifically. Perhaps the exception these days is when someone’s ashes are scattered. But if I say, “My dad died” you’d rightly assume that he was buried. Therefore, it’s notable that all four biblical Gospels describe the burial of Jesus and the help of Joseph of Arimathea as if it were essential.

Moreover, the very earliest summary we have of the Christian message also contained an explicit reference to Jesus’s burial. The Apostle Paul, writing to Christians in Corinth about twenty years after Jesus’s death, summarized the basic Christian good news in this way: “For I handed on to you as of first importance what I, in turn, had received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the scriptures, and that he was buried, and that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve” (1 Corinthians 15:3-5, italics added) There it sits, unadorned but essential: “and that he was buried.”

Why did the earliest Christians, and then why did the writers of the Gospels, consider it so important to mention the actual burial of Jesus? To put the question a different way, what does “and that he was buried” add to the essential Christian message? For one thing, it prepares the way for the affirmation of the resurrection. To say that Jesus died and was raised without mentioning his burial could lead to a misunderstanding of the story. One might think that Jesus was immediately brought back to life from the cross or that he was immediately jettisoned to heaven. “And that he was buried” eliminates these options and explains the place from which Jesus was raised.

But, more important by far, the mention of the burial of Jesus makes it absolutely clear that Jesus really died on the cross. He didn’t just appear to die, as was once proposed by Hugh Schoenfield in his bestselling book, The Passover Plot (1965). Scholars of all theological stripes have discredited Schoenfield’s “swoon theory.” Whatever else can be known about Jesus, all the evidence, from both biblical and extra-biblical sources, points to the simple fact that he really died upon the cross.

When the earliest Christians proclaimed the burial of Jesus, they were saying, in effect, that he really, really died. Had Charles Dickens been among the first Christians, he might have said that Jesus was as dead as a doornail, just like Jacob Marley. I don’t mean to suggest that Jesus’s death, a fairly mundane historical fact, is easy to parse out theologically. After all, Jesus was not just a man, but the God-man. He was the Word of God in flesh, the One in whom was life and who was the source of all life (John 1:1-14). That Jesus died physically, and that, in the process, he suffered the penalty of spiritual death for sin, are mysteries far beyond our ability to fully fathom. How could the One who was the Way, the Truth, and the Life actually die? How could the Author of Life lose his own life? I don’t propose to answer these questions. I’ve been a Christian for over fifty years and they still perplex me . . . and call me to wonder . . . and invite me to worship.

Perhaps Charles Wesley, early in the eighteenth century, penned one of the best responses to the question of the mystery of Christ’s death. Our closing prayer will be the words of his beloved hymn, “And Can It Be That I Should Gain?” I can think of no better way to conclude this Lenten devotional series on Holy Saturday than by reflecting on the reality, mystery, and mercy of the cross, so that we might experience God’s love more truly and powerfully. As Wesley wrote, “Amazing love! How can it be, That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?”

Reflect

When you think of the burial of Jesus, what comes to mind for you?

In what ways does it matter to you that Jesus really died and really was buried?

If you have time, take some moments to reflect on the wonder of Christ’s death and burial. The words of our closing prayer might help you in your contemplation.

Act

On this Holy Saturday, plan for a time when you can quietly reflect on the death of Christ and its meaning for you. Talk with the Lord about what you think and feel in your time of reflection.

Pray

And can it be that I should gain, An interest in the Savior’s blood?
Died He for me, who caused His pain – For me, who Him to death pursued?

Amazing love! How can it be, That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?
Amazing love! How can it be, That Thou, my God, shouldst die for me?

He left His Father’s throne above, So free, so infinite His grace –
Emptied Himself of all but love, And bled for Adam’s helpless race:

‘Tis mercy all, immense and free, For O my God, it found out me!
‘Tis mercy all, immense and free, For O my God, it found out me!

Long my imprisoned spirit lay, Fast bound in sin and nature’s night;
Thine eye diffused a quickening ray – I woke, the dungeon flamed with light;

My chains fell off, my heart was free, I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.
My chains fell off, my heart was free, I rose, went forth, and followed Thee.

No condemnation now I dread; Jesus, and all in Him, is mine;
Alive in Him, my living Head, And clothed in righteousness divine,

Bold I approach th’eternal throne, And claim the crown, through Christ my own.
Bold I approach th’eternal throne, And claim the crown, through Christ my own. Amen.

(Selected verses of “And Can It Be” by Charles Wesley, 1738)


Part 69: He is Not Here, But Has Risen!

Scripture – Luke 24:1-6 (NRSV)

But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, [some women who followed Jesus] came to the tomb, taking the spices that they had prepared. They found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they went in, they did not find the body. While they were perplexed about this, suddenly two men in dazzling clothes stood beside them. The women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen.”

Focus

The basic good news of Easter is found in Luke 24, when the angels say to the women followers of Jesus, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen.” The body of Jesus, who died a terrible death on a Roman cross, was not to be found in the tomb where he had been buried. No, God raised Jesus from the dead, thus breaking the power of sin and death. Because of the resurrection, everything changes. And it’s all based on the simple good news: Christ is risen! He is risen, indeed!

Today’s devotion is part of the series Following Jesus Today.

Devotion

The final verses of Luke 23 record the actions of several faithful women who had followed Jesus. After seeing where and how he had been entombed, they gathered spices and ointments to honor his dead body. They did this on Friday, but did not go to Jesus’s tomb until Sunday because they rested on the Sabbath “according to the commandment” (Luke 23:56).

The Grand Tetons at sunset

© Mark D. Roberts. All rights reserved.

On Sunday morning, the women brought their spices to the tomb, yet they did not find Jesus’s body. This was perplexing to them. But all of a sudden two angels appeared to the women, saying, “Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here, but has risen” (24:5).

Here is the core of Easter truth, the reason for the Easter celebration. Jesus truly died and was truly buried. But he was not in his grave because “he has risen.” The Greek verb translated here as “has risen” is a passive verb. A more literal translation would be “He is not here, but has been raised.” Jesus did not raise himself from the dead. Rather, he was raised by God. In this miracle, God vindicated his Son. God broke the bondage of sin and death. God began a whole new chapter of history, one based on the truth of the resurrection of Jesus.

For centuries, Christians have celebrated the resurrection by a traditional dialogue, the so-called Paschal Greeting. One person says, “Christ is risen!” The other responds, “He is risen, indeed!” There, in a nutshell, is the good news of Easter. There is the news that rewrites history. There is the news that changes everything.

Though the resurrection of Jesus happened almost two millennia ago, it still has the power to change everything. It can turn unbelief into faith, pessimism into hope, defeat into victory. The resurrection reassures us that, no matter how hard things are in this life, there is a life to come. The resurrection shows us that God wins and so will we.

So much more could be said about the resurrection, its meaning, and implications. But, today, I’d like to conclude by focusing our attention on the simple truth, the basic good news of Easter.

Christ is risen!

He is risen, indeed!

Reflect

What difference does the resurrection of Jesus actually make in your life?

Act

Share the Paschal Greeting with people today, whether in person, via Zoom, or on the phone. Say, “Christ is risen!” so that the other can respond “He is risen, indeed!” If you have children or grandchildren, nieces or nephews, you might want to teach them this traditional Easter greeting.

Pray

Lord Jesus, you are risen! You are risen, indeed! What marvelous good news!

I praise you today as the one who died so that I might live.

I praise you as the one who was raised so that, one day, I too might be raised.

I praise you for your victory over sin, suffering, and death.

I praise you for giving us hope that endures.

I praise you for being the One who makes all things new.

All praise, glory, and honor be to you, Lord Jesus, the Risen One. Amen.


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