Fuller

Author: Tod Bolsinger

Online Course:
Tempered Resilience

An Online Course on Fuller Formation Do you find yourself facing leadership challenges that are hard to define or the solutions to them do…

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Webinar: From Surviving to Thriving, Nov 12 at 9:30AM (PT)

Hosted on November 12, 2020 at 9:30AM (PT) Register Now! About Our Speakers Tod Bolsinger joined Fuller Seminary in 2014 as vice president for…

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Canoeing the Mountains: Christian Leadership in Uncharted Territory

Canoeing the Mountains: Christian Leadership in Uncharted Territory If you’re going to scale the mountains of ministry, you need to leave behind canoes and…

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Tempered Resilience: How Leaders are Formed in the Crucible of Change

Tempered Resilience: How Leaders are Formed in the Crucible of Change What type of leadership is needed in a moment that demands adaptive change?…

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Online Course:
Leadership In a Changing World

An Online Course on Fuller Formation The world is changing. How will it affect your leadership in the Church? This resource, which works as…

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Online Course:
Guiding Your Church Through the Pandemic

An Online Course on Fuller Formation What do you do when you can’t bring people together to worship, learn, and care for each other?…

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How Not to Waste a Crisis–Even When You are Exhausted

“If I could retire today, I would,” a pastor told his executive coach recently. But he can’t retire and he wonders how he is…

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Deep Change for a Disrupted Church: A Review of Scott Cormode’s “The Innovative Church”

This article is a Review of The Innovative Church by Scott Cormode. When most church members use the word “innovation” they are usually referring…

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Webinar: Resilience in a (Permanent) Crisis: Practices for Christian Leaders

Watch the Webinar Now: This webinar was presented by Fuller’s De Pree Center and recorded on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 at 9:00AM (PSD) via…

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Leadership Exhaustion and a Spirit of Adventure

“You know that the antidote to exhaustion is not necessarily rest?” “The antidote to exhaustion is not necessarily rest,” I repeated woodenly, as if…

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Webinar: Christian Innovation in Uncharted Territory

Watch the Webinar Now: This webinar was presented by Fuller’s De Pree Center and recorded on Thursday, May 7, 2020 at 11:00AM (PSD) via…

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Leading in Uncharted Territory

In under a month, literally everything about what we assume about what a church DOES changed.  Sunday morning services? Small groups? Committee Meetings? Programs on our church campus?  All cancelled… Even our Easter Sunday Services for many. So, now what does ministry look like in this changing world?  How do we clarify what should never change and at the same time prepare to let go of many things that are dear to us? What does it mean to be adaptive leaders who are able to go into uncharted territory when everybody has been thrust into it at the same time?

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A group of people on an expedition.

Everybody Will Be Changed (Especially the Leader)

The internal and psychological stress of leading, exploring, learning and keeping an organization “on mission” is demanding. The fear of failure weighs heavy. We who started so eagerly to lead something significant for God into uncharted territory start to pine for security and stability. We long to be seen as the “expert” and experience the deference that people in our society offer to those of us who have “made it.”

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Train tracks that end unexpectedly

The Problem with the People You Lead

Did you see that word? Sabotage.

That’s not a word you expected to see in a post on Christian leadership, did you? But, it’s very real. Even for Christians (maybe, especially for Christians)

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Someone consulting a map

In Uncharted Territory, Adaptation is Everything

According to historical geographer John Logan Allen, the moment Meriwether Lewis and his scouting party from the Corps of Discovery crested the Lemhi Pass looking for the Columbia River and found only miles and miles of snow capped peaks, was when his “geography of hope” gave way to the “geography of reality.” And a disappointing reality it must have been.

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