Fuller

Life For Leaders

Life for Leaders is our digitally delivered devotional, sent every day.
article image for Our Dual Identity

Our Dual Identity

Some of my favorite heroes have a dual identity: Clark Kent is Superman; Bruce Wayne is Batman; Peter Parker is Spider-Man. The list goes on and on. You and I also have a dual identity, though, unlike the comic book heroes, our dual identity isn’t secret. It’s plainly revealed in Scripture, beginning in Genesis 2:7.

Read Post
article image for Submission is Essential for Leadership

Submission is Essential for Leadership

As we read Psalm 2 today, our context is quite different. We no longer have human kings ruling over us. Moreover, we have come to understand that Psalm 2 points ahead to the one who was fully the Son of God. Thus, when we read verse 12, we hear a call to kiss, that is, to submit to Jesus, the Son of God.

Read Post
article image for Hearing the Story of God

Hearing the Story of God

Genesis 2:3 completes the first creation account in the Bible, with a picture of God at rest. Genesis 2:4 begins the second creation account, which narrates the creation of the world in a way that is both like and unlike the first account. In both tellings of the creation, God is the sovereign Lord who creates all things according to his will. Both Genesis 1 and Genesis 2 emphasize the centrality of human beings in creation and their unique role in the stewardship of what God has made.

Read Post
article image for Should I Keep the Sabbath?

Should I Keep the Sabbath?

For centuries, Christians have debated the question of Sabbath keeping, proposing a wide range of answers, often with more heat than light. Thus, it seems almost foolish for me to think that I can responsibly address the question “Should I keep the Sabbath?” in one short devotional. Nevertheless, I want to offer some basic parameters that might help guide our thinking and practice.

Read Post
article image for If God Rested, Shouldn’t We?

If God Rested, Shouldn’t We?

I was raised to value hard work. My family, my church, and the culture of my youth rewarded me when I was productive. So did my college and graduate school experience, as did the churches in which I served during the first half of my life. I remember one performance review I had as pastor of Irvine Presbyterian Church. Before our meeting to talk about my efforts, I had told my reviewers that I was working at a pace that was not sustainable. I asked for their help in reshaping my priorities so that I might do what was most valuable for the church without burning myself out. When it came time for our face-to-face conversation, they told me that, for the most part, I was doing a good job. But they recommended that I teach more Bible classes, invest more in my staff, and be more available to the congregation for counseling. Basically, they wanted me to work more. This, of course, tapped into my inclination to work too much, not to mention my inherent desire to please. More work, less rest. That’s the ticket to success and fulfillment.

Read Post
article image for Why Did God Rest?

Why Did God Rest?

Recently, my wife and I moved from Texas to California. Our final day in Texas was a crazy one as we scrambled to sell some of our possessions, give away many more, and take a bunch of junk to the dump. Then, after the movers finished emptying our house, we spent hours cleaning, getting everything ready for the new owners so they might move into a tidy, welcoming home. We didn’t leave until 10:45 p.m., having worked steadily from 7:00 a.m. By the time we finally arrived at our motel early the next morning, we were exhausted and more than ready to rest.

Read Post