Fuller

Author: Matthew Dickerson

Matthew Dickerson's books include works of spiritual theology and Christian apologetics as well as historical fiction, fantasy literature, explorations of the writings of C.S.Lewis and J.R.R.Tolkien, and books about trout fishing, fly fishing, rivers, and ecology. His recent books include: Disciple Making in a Culture of Power, Comfort, and Fear and The Voices of Rivers: Reflections on Places Wild and Almost Wild. He was a 2017 artist-in-residence at Glacier National Park. He lives in Vermont with his wife, dog, and cat, not far from three married sons, and is an active member of Memorial Baptist Church. Matthew is also a professor of computer science at Middlebury College in Vermont.

A man holding a Bible and preaching to a group of people

Consumerism and Worship, Part 2

Christ’s followers are not called to compete in a consumer market by offering a popular product with an easy-to-swallow message. But neither are Christians called to be intentionally abrasive. Jesus dined with tax-collectors and prostitutes. He was friends with sinners. That’s one of the very things that made him unpopular with the religious leaders of his day.

Read Post
A hallway in a high-end shopping center

The Church and Consumerism, Part 1

When people approach church as consumers shopping for a product, it is tempting for Christians—especially church leaders—to respond with a similar mindset: to view church as a product that must please customers in order to sell. Jesus calls us to a different approach than a consumer model. Though it is often not a popular message, the Gospel should always point to Christ, and through Christ back to the Father.

Read Post
A crowd of people in a dark room in front of a sign that says "JESUS" with their hands raised in worship

Consumerism and Worship

Contrary to a mentality of consumerism, when we gather for worship we should not be shopping for an experience. Worship is a response to what God has already done for us, and an act of love and obligation toward our brothers and sisters in Christ. Worship is not about ourselves.

Read Post
A homeless man sheltering in front of a fancy store with sale signs in the windows

Resisting Conformance to Consumerism

Followers of Christ are called to resist conforming to the patterns of this world. As we work to avoid conforming to our culture, it is helpful to critically think through what those patterns of our culture are, and how they influence us.

Read Post
A person fishing in a river

Restoration in Rest

Constant work not only exhausts us, but it exhausts the world around us. It is consumptive. When we choose to build in rhythms of rest and delight, we give those around us and the earth itself a break from our demands.

Read Post
People rushing up and down the stairs of a building

“Are You Keeping Busy?”

Our culture idolizes and rewards busyness. Although work is a good part of God’s plan for humankind, God does not intend us to be constantly busy. Instead, he invites us to daily, weekly, and seasonal times of rest. Choosing to build rest into the rhythms of our lives is one of the most important steps of faith we can take.

Read Post
A signpost with arrows pointing in different directions against the background of a sunset

Discernment and Knowledge

Life is full of difficult decisions for which there are often no easy or obvious choices. We all need discernment.

Read Post
A set of German road signs including one for a U-turn

Discernment and Love

Love requires difficult decisions. Followers of Christ seek discernment to make those decisions.

Read Post
Beautiful blue flowers growing in a small creamer pitcher

Gentleness, Thanksgiving, and Rejoicing

Jesus modeled gentleness to his disciples.

Read Post
Tall grass growing on a foggy day

Gentleness and Anxiety

While our anxieties can make it more difficult to be gentle, God promises gentleness as the fruit of his Spirit.

Read Post
A shepherd in the mountains with a flock of sheep

Work Harmed and Redeemed

Sin and death impact all of our labors in many ways: we labor toward evil ends, or with evil motives; we become greedy or prideful about our work; our relationships are harmed by sin, and broken community also negatively impacts our labors.

Read Post
A copy of a Genesis commentary on a desk

Sin, Mortality, and Work

We were made for fruitful labor, as one of the ways that we glorify our creator God. Nonetheless, work in this world has been negatively impacted by sin and death.

Read Post
A tired man staring at a phone screen

Vulnerability and Empathy

In imitating Jesus, we can learn to be vulnerable and empathetic with others.

Read Post
An elderly woman crossing the street with a heavy bag of groceries

Jesus and Vulnerability

Our culture values strength and invulnerability. However, Christ calls us to the practice of vulnerability.

Read Post
A cherry tree in the winter sunlight with dew on it

Advent and the Earth

Creation groans and suffers from the results of human sin.

Read Post